Eligibility for UK State Pension

To be eligible for a UK state pension, you need to have been employed or self-employed in the UK and/or have made National Insurance Contributions for a certain minimum number of years (which could include voluntary contributions or time spent in child care).

These years of National Insurance contributions are referred to as “qualifying years”. Depending on your age, the number of years that you need to qualify for a minimum pension will vary. There are three main groups of pensioners. 

To see where you stand with regard to your pension, place yourself in one of three categories that may apply:

1)  Men born before 6th April 1945 and women born before 6th April 1950

These people reached pension age (65 for a man and 60 for a woman) before 6th April 2010.  A man needs a minimum of 11 years National Insurance contributions and a woman needs a minimum of 10 years National Insurance contributions to get any pension at all.  At this late stage, just one voluntary payment can be made to top-up your pension contributions to meet the minimum, and only if you reach pension age in 2009/10.

2) Men born on or after 6th April 1945 and before 6th April 1951. Women born on or after 6th April 1950 and before 6th April 1953

Men in this group reach pension age at 65.  Women reach pension age somewhere between 60 and 63 (as the pension age is steadily rising to match that for men).  People in this group get some pension for every year of National Insurance contributions.  A full pension requires 30 years’ contributions, and one year gets 1/30th of a full pension which currently stands at £113 per week. Between two and seven voluntary contributions can be made to top-up your contributions depending on your pension date.

3) Men born on or after 6th April 1951 and women born on or after 6th April 1953

The pension age for men in this age group is steadily increasing, starting at 65 for men and 63 for women.

People in this group reach pension age on or after 6th April 2016, and will need a minimum of 10 years’ National Insurance contributions. 35 years are needed to get a full pension of about £160 per week.  Also you can make a minimum of 10 voluntary payments to top up your pension contributions.

Voluntary contributions are a very good investment.  The usual Class 3 contribution costs about £700 for each year purchased, and this is recouped in under 4 years once your pension starts.  The Class 2 contribution, usually available to people who are working, costs only £143 for each year, and is recouped within the first year of pension.  You must have worked 3 years in the UK, or lived in the UK for 3 continuous years to qualify.

A partial pension is simply prorated based on the number of qualifying years you have. For example, if you have 10 qualifying years, then you would be eligible for a pension equal to 1/3 of the full pension amount. For 2013, the full UK state pension is £5,727 per annum.

These qualifying years provide what is known as a Category A Pension. In addition, the spouse or civil partner of someone receiving a Category A pension may be entitled to receive a Category B pension, even if they have never worked in the UK, lived in the UK, or even visited the UK themselves. The Category B pension is based on a percentage of the Category A pension being received by the main pensioner, (approximately 60%).

Comments

  1. William Miller says:

    I was wondering wether or not I would receive 60% of my wives pension as spousal support.
    I am a British citizen born in Edinburgh on October 20th 1950′
    I married a woman from Peebles in Scotland who is still my wife (still together)
    I am unsure how to obtain the forms allowing me to apply for this benefit,

    We both now live in Canada moved here on May 4th 1991.1

    • David Morris says:

      Hello William, yes you should be entitled to a spousal pension, based on your wife’s contributions to the NI scheme. You both have to have reached pension age for you to apply. You have to apply separately from your spouse. If you join us, we will send you a package of information, including how you go about claiming your pension

  2. Michael Mulvaney says:

    Hello David

    I am a South African with dual British nationality and have 14 qualifying years of NIS contributions. I have been offerred a post within the SA Govt which requires that I relinquish my British citizenship. If I do this will it affect my UK State Pension and how can I go about making voluntary contributions from SA if I am still eligible?
    regards
    Michael Mulvaney

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Michael, it will not affect your eligibility for a UK pension. The pension is based solely on NIS contributions, not citizenship. You can make voluntary contributions from abroad. If you join us, we will send you a complete information package on how to get started, including how to make voluntary contributions, and possibly qualify for the lower class 2 rate

  3. James Angelo says:

    Hi,

    My name is James Angelo. I father worked for the Royal Air Force in oman for about 15 years, when its under the U.K government. So i just want to know my whether my father is eligible for something from UK government.

    Thank You.

  4. I was born 1954, worked in Scotland from age 15 to 23 then came to Canada. Am I eligible for the UK pension, I have applied for my national Insurance Number, but not sure where to go from there, I know the legislation is changing in 2016 so I need to be on top of this to make voluntary payments before that time.

    thanks,

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Maureen, you will need 10 years to qualify for a minimum pension. Looks like you already have 8. You have time to make voluntary contributions to make sure you just don’t lose the 8 you already have. You can go back 6 years, plus make payments going forward until you reach pension age in 2019.
      I suggest you join us. You can join here on the website. http://www.britishpensions.com/joinrenew/
      Once you join, we will send you a package of information on what do next. We will also let you know how to make voluntary contributions, and perhaps qualify to make the lower Class 2 voluntary payment. Our office is staffed by volunteers and are available to help if you have questions.

    • margaret keenan says:

      I was born on the 3rd of February 1956, and worked in England for over 12 years, am I entitled to uk pension.

      • David Morris says:

        Hello Margaret, yes, you are entitled to a UK state pension, plus you still have time to increase it by making voluntary contributions.

  5. My father who is 70 worked in the UK for a number of years. He is living in the US, California. How does he collect his pension? He does not know his National Insurance number.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Neelam. He would need to have worked 11 years in the UK, to qualify for a minimum pension. If he did, then he is eligible, and in fact his pension will be backdated to age 65. It can be paid to any bank account in the US. If he joins us, we will send a package of information on how to apply for the pension, and what to do if he doesn’t know his NI number. As long as he can remember either his last address in the UK, or his last employer, they can find his NI number

  6. Hi David,
    My name is Raja Boussoffara,I am tunisian and 63 years old.I worked as a french language teacher for a year from September 1973 until July 1974,in Grove Hill school,Hemel Hempstead.I have already written to you a week ago to inquire about eligibility for a pension and you said I am,however I do not remember anything about my insurance number.All I have saved is a certificate of registration which was issued from Herts.CONSTABULARY A.R.C. No F.230007 on 18.10.73 and on which it’s mentioned I stayed at 34 Tamar Green, Hemel Hempstead. I am so sorry to disturb as you have too many inquiries but I don’t know what to do, I called a number in Canada,they gave me a number to call to get my health insurance number,they keep me waiting for ages after that they tell me to call later as they’re too busy.Thank you so much for helping and I am awfully sorry for disturbing.
    Thanks for your time

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Raja, you need to write to the Dept of Works and pensions in the UK to find out your National Insurance number.
      If you join us, we will send you a package of information on who to write to, and how to get a pension statement, and how to apply for your pension.

  7. Tim Cary says:

    I was born in the UK in 1956 and left when I was 21 in 1978 to come to the US where I have worked ever since. I am 58. I worked part time jobs from 1973 to 1976 as a student on weekends and in the summer. Do I qualify for a UK pension when I reach retiring age, and if not what would I need to do to qualify?

    Thank you

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Tim, you will need 10 years of contributions in the UK to qualify for a minimum pension. You don’t have that now, but the good news is that you are able to make voluntary contributions from abroad to get you to the minimum at least. The first step is to find out what your contribution record in the UK is. If you join us, we will send you a full package of information on how to get started with this, including who to write to in the UK, and how to make voluntary contributions

  8. Dear David

    My Mom and Dad were both born in the UK before 1945. My dad worked for more than 10 years before he left the UK, my mom was at varisty and then worked for a total of 2 years. They left in 1958 and didn’t work again in the UK since then. My dad died in 1985. My Mum applied for a pension some years ago but apparently she didn’t qualify and she seems to think that because she applied for a pension, she’s not able to re-apply for a widow’s pension. My questions are: is she entitled to any type of pension at all? And if so, how do I start this process? The family have resided in South Africa since their arrival in 1958 and are (were) both British passport holders. Thanks in advance.

    Fern

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Fern, your mother should be eligible for a widows pension. That is completely separate from a pension in her own right, which she is not eligible for. She can certainly apply again for a widows pension. The first step is to contact the Dept of Works and pensions in the UK and tell them the situation.

      • Hello David. I am planning to move back to England from Australia to retire and live . I am 64 years of age and currently receive a part UK pension since 201. .I was born in the UK in January 1951 and have a British passport. I worked in the UK from the age of 15 to 27. Then in 1978 I moved to Australia to marry my now X husband who is Australian. Now divorced. I have adult son and daughter who don not know if they are going to move to the UK with me at this stage. I am eilgable for the Australian aged pension at 65 years old which will be in January 2016.

        I am concerned that if and when I move back to the UK that I wont be eligable for a full Uk pension because i havent paid the 30 year conrtibutions to national Insurance. Is this correct?. .I need to know the answer so I can plan and make a decsion where I shall retire.
        I have three brothers and five sisters in the UK and have always wanted to spend my retirement back there. My parents are both diseased. If you are unable to give me an answer to this question, where shall I go to or email to get an answer?. one of my sisters tells me I will be eligable for other benefits like tax benefit and hosuing benefit, is this right?.My future depends on this question and where I will live my days out. Any advice or information you can provide would be greatly appreciated. I will wait to hear back from you David. Thank you

        • David Morris says:

          Hello Pat, you are correct in that if you move back to the UK, you will not get the full UK pension. What will happen is that you will now get regular annual increases to the pension you are already getting. Your pension will no longer be frozen, but it will not be a full pension. You may also be entitled to other old age benefits in the UK, but I can not help you with that. I have been away from the UK for many years, and I do not know what the current benefits available are. Your family in the UK should be able to help you with that. You should also contact the Australian Government to make sure that you will not lose the pension from them

  9. Michael Lawson says:

    Hi I am a British pensioner living in South Africa ( born in the UK and receiving a reduced pension) my wife who holds a full British Passport was born in South Africa, when I die is she entitled to a British Widows pension ? and also when she reaches 65 is she entitled to a British Pension even though she has never lived or worked in the UK.

    Many Thanks

    Mike

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Michael, I need to know your wifes date of birth before I can answer your question about her eligibility for a spousal pension

      • Michael Lawson says:

        hi David

        Date of Birth is 9th April 1953

        • David Morris says:

          Hello Michael, unfortunately, I think she misses out by a couple of months. She reaches pension age in July 2016, and the law changes in April 2016, so that spousal pensions are no longer available to anyone who reached pension age after that date. Sorry

          • Michael Lawson says:

            Thanks David

            Would she be eligible for a Widows pension on my death ?

          • David Morris says:

            Hello Michael, unfortunately not. They are dropping all new “derived” pensions after April 2016. You can only earn a pension on your own contribution record.

  10. Hi David,

    I am 60 years old and was born in the UK and still hold a UK passport. I left the UK with my parents when I was four and have never been back except on a short business trip.
    My wife is 54 and was born in the UK and worked there for 5 years before immirgrating.
    Is she due a UK pension and if so how much. Would I be due any sort of UK pension.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Tim, your wife could become eligible for a pension. She will need 10 years of work credits to be eligible for a minimum pension, but the good news is that she is able to make voluntary contributions from abroad. Unfortunately, you are not eligible.

  11. Hello David, thank you for all your hard work.
    Can you tell me if it is possible to buy back a pension/partial pension with a lump sum? You seem to imply that it must be done annually, by increments.
    I am seventy, British-born, but living in Africa in an area that is increasingly threatening for women.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Jane, yes you can buy back with a lump sum. Each year is recorded separately, but you can buy back them all at once, if you wish.

  12. Hi David,
    Thanks for your reply of 14th April 2015,it’s good news that I can qualify for a pension but I have no clue who to write to or what to do.Thanks for helping.
    Thanks for your time.

  13. john o'hanlon says:

    Dear David,
    I was born in England Sept 1952 (will be 63 this year).
    I emigrated to NZ in 1974 and worked for 15 years. I then emigrate to Switzerland and worked there for 23 years.
    My question: do my working years in NZ & Switzerland count towards a UK pension?
    NB: Switzerland is not in the EU.
    Also – although I worked in part-time jobs as a full-time student during holidays over 5 years 1969-74, I am unsure if the total working time exceeds 1 year (how do I find out?).
    Warm regards, John

    • David Morris says:

      Hello John, If there is a reciprocal agreement between the UK and NZ or Switzerland, then you may be eligible to have your working time there credited towards a UK pension. Unfortunately, I do not know if there is such an agreement. You would need to research this, or contact the DWP in the UK. In terms of your part time work, generally, if you earned more than approx. £5,000 in a given year, you would get credit for the entire year. You would need to write to the Dept of works and pensions in the UK to find out your employment record

  14. nick kenrick says:

    i was born in UK in 1960
    moved to Canada in 1989

    now age 55

    i worked in UK , what do i have to do now ??
    thanks

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Nick, the best thing to do is join us. We will send you an information package on how to get a pension statement, and how to make voluntary contributions. It sounds like you are eligible for at least a partial pension, and you can add to that by making voluntary contributions

      • Kuldip S Mann says:

        Hello
        I was born in India 1953 Nov
        Immigrated to England in August 1967.
        Went to school and worked part time or summer vacations from 1968.
        Worked full time from 1970 to 1977.
        Part time from 1978 to 1980.
        Have not lived in England since 1980.
        Presently live in Canada and got injured and disabled since 2012.
        If I was to go back to England will I qualify for any pension ?

        • David Morris says:

          Hello Kuldip, you should be able to qualify for a UK pension, either here in Canada, or back in the UK. You need 10 years of work credits to qualify for a minimum pension, and you may already have that. If not, you still have time to make voluntary contributions to get you there.

  15. Helene O'Hagan says:

    Hi David,

    I was born in the UK and work full time from 1980 – 1995 then moved to Ireland and have been working here full time since then.
    I’m thinking of moving back to the UK and wondered if my contributions to my state pension in Ireland could be transferred and added to my UK state pension pot?? I’m 52 and will continue to work until 65.

    Thank you

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Helene, yes. As you worked in an EU country ALL work experience in any EU country is credited towards a final pension. You will apply for a pension in the country that you reside in at retirement age, and they will take into account all working experience.

  16. Hi David,
    I am 63 in a few days,I am Tunisian and worked for a whole school year as a french language teacher in Grove Hill school, Hemel Hempstead,. One of my old friends who worked the same period told me she gets a pension as well as her husband which is too good to be true! is that possible? I would be grateful if you could help me.
    Thank you in advance
    Raja

    • David Morris says:

      hello Raja, you only needed 1 year to qualify for a partial pension, so you may well qualify for that. You will not be able to make any voluntary contributions as you did not reside in the UK for at least 3 years, but you are probably entitled to a pension based on 1 year – which will be 1/30th of a full pension, roughly equal to £199 a year

  17. Hi David,

    I am living in Singapore and hope to establish foreign domicile status (do you have any advice on how I would do this?). I am contributing NI payments towards my UK Pension and I understand from previous posts that I can still collect my pension (when the time comes) if I change my citizenship but in the meantime can I still make the voluntary contributions towards my pension qualifying years if I change citizenship before retirement age?

    Appreciate your help.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Stuart, I can’t help you with the foreign domicile status. In terms of pension, yes you can continue to make voluntary contributions to the UK pension, regardless of your citizenship or residence status.

  18. Andrew Bennett says:

    Hi, I was born in England in 1977 and left at 1983… i then returned for 2.5 years doing casual contract work from mid 2005 to end of 2007. I don’t know if there any options for me to contribute voluntarily to allow me to receieve part/full pension later on or if this is a waste of time. I have never worked in england beyond 3 years, but did live 3 years continously up till 5.5 years old. I am an Australian Citizen and this is where i have spent my life other than in the UK

    thanks

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Andrew, yes, you can make voluntary contributions from abroad which will entitle you to a UK pension. You will need 10 years worth to qualify for a minimum, and 35 years for the maximum. You have lots of time to make those contributions, but I wouldn’t delay, because you eventually lose the ability to contribute for each year that passes. Financially, it is a worthwhile investment.

  19. Robin Ellis says:

    I was born in Scotland in 1956 and worked for 2 years (1975-1977) before leaving the country. I am now resident in Canada. Am I eligible for anything from the UK?

    Thanks

    Robin

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Robin, you will need 10 years of NI contributions to qualify for a minimum pension. The good news is that you can make voluntary contributions from Canada, and you still have time to get you to at least 10, or more. That will qualify you for a partial pension. If you decide to make those contributions, you should start as soon as possible, to give you the maximum pension

  20. DAVID CARTER says:

    Hi David,
    Hope you can help. I was born in the U.K. in September of 1950. Worked from the age of 17 until 1982 when I moved to N.Z. I know I am entitled a N.Z. pension, who then claim part back from the U.K. I now live in Thailand and at present do not wish to go back to N.Z. to claim my pension, which I have to do. I can’t find a email address for any U.K pension apartments who can help or simply give me advise about any entitlements I might get.
    Any thoughts would be grateful.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello David, you are entitled to a partial UK pension. You also still have the ability to make some voluntary payments to increase it. You will reach UK pension age in September of this year. If you join us, we will send you by email a package of information about how to make voluntary payments, how to apply for the pension, who to contact etc.

  21. Barbara Hutton says:

    Hi David.

    I was born in Scotland in Sept. 1951. Moved to Australia at 8 years and returned at 16. Worked for a little less than 2 years and returned to Oz. I vaguely recall having taken my National Insurance as a refunded cash amount. Would that be correct? I am heading towards retirement and need to find out whether I’m entitled to a British pension.
    Thank you

    Barbara

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Barbara, you are entitled to a partial pension. You only needed 1 year to qualify, and you have that. You reached UK pension age in 2013, but you can still buy back a couple of years. You can’t normally get a refund of your NI contributions. You should look into making some voluntary contributions as soon as possible

  22. Ross Poppleton says:

    Hello David,

    I am a British citizen, I worked 27 years in the UK and 21 years in the USA. I am currently being paid social security retirement benefits in the USA. Could you tell me if I would also be eligible for social security/pension from the UK please?
    I was diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease and had to retire early at 64 years 7 months, I was born 4th May 1950.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Ross, there is a reciprocal agreement between the US and the Uk for pensions. This means that your work record in one country may be taken into account when calculating the retirement benefits in the other. If the US did not take into account your UK work record for calculating the social security retirement benefit in the US, then yes, you are absolutely entitled to a UK pension. You will reach UK pension age in May 2015, so you can apply now.

  23. Janet Green says:

    Hi David I was born in the UK Dec 50 and worked from 1969 – 83 on and off. was married in 71. I moved to Canada in 1989 and was divorced in 1991.Do I qualify for a full pension?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Janet, you reached pension age in 2011 and you needed 30 years of work for a full pension. I can’t tell exactly how many you have, but it looks like it may be around 15 – 17, so you won’t qualify for a full pension. You still are able to buy back a couple of years, so you should get at least 50% of a pension or more. Because you haven’t yet claimed your pension, you also will be entitled to an increase in the base amount for every year you deferred it (or you could opt for a lump sum backdated to 2011). If you choose an increase in the base amount, it will add about 12% for every year you defer.

  24. Noli J. says:

    Hi, I just got my British Citizenship 2 years ago and will migrate to UK next year..I am 49 years old now and still planning to work. Will I still be entitled to have pension even I will start at this age?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Noli, the pension system in the UK is a contributory one, so for every year of work, you will build an entitlement. You will also be entitled to a Canadian pension for the years you worked here

  25. joanne halliday says:

    Please can you help me. My mom is moving back to Scotland after living out the country for 45 years. She does receive a small pension (she is 82) but is trying to find out what she would get moving back to the UK and how long it would take to take effect? Also if she married would she receive more? Any advise would be appreciated. Thanks

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Joanne, your mum will get her pension uprated to current levels when she moves back. The amount she gets will be based on the number of years credit that was used to calculate her existing pension. I can’t tell you what that amount is, without knowing the number of years she had. A full pension in the UK is about £115 a week. She will get a percentage of that, based on how many years pension credit was given to her. It should take effect immediately on her return. She will need to advise the local pension dept when she returns. She won’t receive more if she marries.

  26. John Wilson says:

    I was born in Scotland in 1952 and worked in the U.K. from about September 1969 to March 1975 before emigrating to Canada and I also worked in the U.K. for a few months between 1996 – 1997. Am I eligible to buy back ten years of pension and receive a portion of the U.K. pension?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello John, it looks like you have about 6 or 7 years already. You need 10 to qualify for a minimum. Yes, you still have time to buy back enough years to get you to at least 10. You should be able to buy back 6, plus another two years until pension age in 2017. Don’t delay though, as you lose the right to buy back years as time goes on. If you join us, we will get you started on what to do next.

  27. Martina says:

    Hello David
    I’m Italian but worked in London from Sept 1995 to Feb 2003, so 7 and 1/2 years.
    I worked continuosly during that period and was wondering whether once I get to 63 I can get a UK pension directly from UK or not.
    I’ve read above that one needs 10 year contributions for a minimum pension whilst I have 7.5.

    Now I’ve relocated back to Italy.
    thanks for your answer
    Martina

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Martina, I am not familiar with EU rules for pensions. Pensions are harmonized in the UK, which generally means you get pension credit for any years worked anywhere in the EU. You should talk to the pension authorities in Italy, who will tell you the rules

    • Hi Martina,
      I have found the following website useful for the EU pension rules. You might be able to apply one of the sample stories.

      http://europa.eu/youreurope/citizens/work/retire-abroad/state-pensions-abroad/index_en.htm

      I’m not an expert! I’m just in a similar situation as you.
      My understanding is that in your case UK should be paying a pro-rata pension for the 7.5 years you worked in UK.

  28. Natasha Maslesha says:

    Hello,

    My father is from Macedonia, and he worked in UK for 5 years. My question is does he have a right to one-time or monthly payment?

    Thank you in advance,

    Natasha

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Natasha, I can’t answer your question unless I know your fathers date of birth, and where he is living now.

    • Anne Marie Ward says:

      Hi, my date of birth is 09.12.52 ……… I’ve been living in Spain thus past 15years, but worked in uk for many years . Am I entitled to a basic uk pension, and if so, when should I apply. Thank you

      • David Morris says:

        Hello Anne Marie, because you live in the EU, you come under their rules. Pensions are harmonized in the EU, so you will get a pension for any years spent working anywhere in the EU. I can’t help you with the rules for applying as you are supposed to apply in Spain. The Spanish pension authorities will contact the UK. You reach UK pension age this year.

  29. Helen McPeake says:

    Hi David,
    My date of birth is 14 April 1949. I worked in N ireland up until Jan 22 1988 and then moved to Canada. I have not applied for my pension yet as I am still working. When I do apply for it will it be frozen from the date I claim it or was it frozen from the day I left N Ireland. Have you any idea of the amount I might recieve.

    Also my partner and I have lived together for the past 12 years he also is from N ireland and worked there up untill 1972.
    His date of birth is 22nd May 1949. Will he recieve a pension. One more question do they recognise common law partners in Britian. For is he is not entitled to a pension will he then recieve one as I am eligible.

    I am a member and thanks for all your great work.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Helen, thanks for being a member, and hello to a fellow Northern Irelander
      In regards to your questions. Your pension will be frozen only from when you first receive it, not when you left N. Ireland. You reached pension age in 2009, so when you do claim it, you can opt for a lump sum back payment to then, or get a bigger weekly pension amount instead. Your pension amount will be based on the actual number of years. It looks like you have maybe 23 years, so you would get 23/39ths of a full pension. That equals about £3,500 a year. It will actually be more than that if you opt for an increased pension instead of a lump sum. At a rough guess it would be about £6,200 a year.
      As for your partner, he is entitled to a pension in his own right, for any time he worked there. He only needed 1 year to qualify for a minimum. He reached pension age in 2014, so he still has time to buy back a few years. Unfortunately, he does not qualify for a spousal pension, as they were only available to men born after April 1950

  30. Alexander Ritchie says:

    Hello David,
    I was born in 1958 in Edinburgh Scotland and worked in the UK from around 1973 until 1978 until i moved to Canada,
    Am i entitled to a state pension? and if so what steps do i take,and also i have no record of my insurance # in the UK, how can i trace this.
    Thank you . Alex.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Alexander, you will need 10 years of NI contributions to qualify for a minimum pension. The good news is that you have until 2024 to make enough voluntary contributions which will more than get you there. If you join us, we can help. We will send you a package of information, including how to find out your NI number, apply for a pension statement, and make voluntary contributions. It is a really good financial deal to make these contributions, so you should seriously consider it.

  31. my 72 year old English friend dies from a heart attack last year. He lived and worked in Thailand for over 25 years. he was a very successful business man and died leaving a tidy sum of money. he bought land and built a house but had to put everything in his female companionship’s name as he wasn’t able to own the land. He lived with this lady for 16 years at there house. Question, Is she entitled to any thing from his pension as they lived together for so long, is she classified as a common law wife. thank you for any help

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Colin, I am not knowledgeable in what is considered common law marriage in Thailand, but I would guess that she would be considered as a common law wife. In terms of pension entitlement, providing she reaches pension age before April 2016, then she would be entitled to a spousal pension equal to what your friend was receiving.

  32. Hi David
    My wife was born in the UK in 1952. In March 2015 she starting receiving UK pension based on the 4 years work that she did back in 1970-1973. Is it to late for her to buy back years of pension? Also I was born in 1955 and have never klived/worked in the UK. Will I be eligible for 60% of her pension when I reach 65?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Tom, she should be able to buy back a few years, possibly 4 or 5. She would need to apply to do that. As you reach pension age after 2016, you will not be entitled to any spousal pension

      • Thanks David.
        Where can I get the application forms?
        Also, should her pension also have been adjusted for those years where she raised children and finally, would she qualify for back pay? The reason I ask was neither of these items ere addressed in the original application.

        • David Morris says:

          Hello Tom, she must have already sent in an application form if she is now receiving a pension. That application should have contained any child raising years in the UK. To apply to make back payments, she simply needs to write to the DWP on the UK.
          If you join us, we will send you an information package that covers all of that in detail

  33. Hi David,

    My husband is deceased (2008) but worked in the UK for a number of years before moving to Canada. Am I entitled to a widows pension?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Lilian, I can’t answer your question without knowing both you and your husbands date of birth

  34. robert bovingdon says:

    I have lived in Holland for 46 years ,left England when I was 20 .am now 65 have I right to a pension from the UK over the period that I worked in the UK.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Robert, the short answer is yes. When you apply for your pension in Holland, you tell them about your work record in the UK, and they will handle it from there.

  35. Hello ,
    Im british by birth and have lived in canada for most of my life .
    I did work 2 years in England and would like to come back to England to retire. I was born in 1962
    would i be entitled to any pension or any other type of old age living allowance.
    Txs LOU

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Louise, I can only comment on the UK state pension, not on any other benefits that might be available in the UK. You will need 10 years to qualify for a minimum pension. Unfortunately, to be able to make voluntary contributions, you need to have resided in the UK for 3 years. That means you won’t be able to get to the 10 years you need.

  36. HI, I was born 1949 October. I am a female. I left Scotland in 1972.
    I worked full time in Scotland from 1964 to 1968. Am I entitled to any U.K.pension? thanks.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Margo, unfortunately no. You are in the age group that needed 10 years to qualify, and it is now too late to buy back enough to get you to that number

    • val mcdonald says:

      personally i would contact the uk pension office they will tell you if your entitled and how much.i think your before the 10 yr rule

  37. Collins says:

    Living in the U.K. does the government give every-one a sponsored pension like Canada pension ?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Collins, I am not sure what your question means. Yes, the UK has a contributory pension scheme similar to the Canada pension Scheme.

  38. My father in law moved to the UK in 2006.

    He has been unable to find work and has not been employed since moving.
    He has a disability but has been claiming JSA as well as housing benefit.
    He was born in 1956. His wife has also never worked.

    Is he applicable for a pension? Assuming not would he be entitled to any other benefits?

    We are trying to plan for our future but concerned how this may impact our plans.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Kieran, I can’t comment about the benefits available to people living in the UK. This website is for people who have left the UK and are living abroad.

  39. Hello
    Thank you for a VERY informative site…. I am widowed been married to my late husband for 4 years, he was a British national…… he paid NI for all his life .and drew a British pension whilst alive ……. Since he has passed am I eligible for a British pension – I am South African and have never worked in the UK . My date of birth is 01 September 1954 if I am eligible is their a percentage of what is due to me ………. I am in the process of claiming a bereavement benefit ( widows pension) which I am also not sure I qualify for but have applied anyway. …………. thereafter am I also entitled to a widows pension .
    Many thanks in advance

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Avril, unfortunately, you reach pension age in 2020, which is after the new pension legislation comes into force. Spousal pensions are being eliminated for those people that reach pension age after 2016, so you would not qualify. Sorry.

  40. Jennifer says:

    My husband and I live in New Zealand and are getting nearer to the pension age and heard that my husband will need his national insurance number from back in the 70′s. Please advise how we go about obtaining this as have no current record of it. Thank you

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Jennifer, you need to write to the DWP and tell them his last address in the UK, and his last employer.
      If you join us, we can help you how to get started.

  41. Debbie Harpin says:

    I worked in England from Sept.1976 to the end of 1980. I was born in 1954.
    I understand that I have not got enough years to receive a pension but can I make voluntary contributions to bring my years work up to the eligible date?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Debbie, absolutely. You need 10 years for a minimum pension. You have 5 now. You reach pension age in 2019, so you can make voluntary contributions going forward, plus you can make back contributions for 6 years. You can end up with 14 or 15 years of eligibility.

  42. bhag singh buttar says:

    hi dear my dob is 20 june 1950.i will start getting pension in june 2015.i got married in 1971 my wife still living with me .I want to ask you can my wife apply for pension based on my contribution.her dob is 10 march 1952.she never went to uk.we are living in Canada.please reply in detail I shall be thankful to you.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Bhag Singh, yes your spouse is entitled to a UK pension equal to 60% of your pension. She will have to apply for it. It doesn’t come automatically.

  43. I was born in 1940 and grew up in the UK. I worked full-time in the UK between 1964 and 1969. In late 1969 I came to Canada and have lived here ever since.
    At this late date a friend suggested I apply for a UK pension. I wrote to DWP with the above details and they have sent me form IPC BR1 GOV to complete.
    Now I see from your very helpful website that since I am in your category 1 I’m not eligible for any pension. Also, I cannot make any voluntary additional contributions – is that correct? Does citizenship or years of non-working residence in the UK make any difference? As a married woman I could choose between two rates of national insurance contribution. I chose the lower rate. My husband was a student in the UK but never worked there.
    Thanks so much for any help!

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Susan, unfortunately you are correct. You needed 10 years of contributions, and it is too late now to make back payments. Citizenship and residence does not matter, as such. The only thing that matters is whether you made NI contributions, or had credit for contributions based on some factors such as child raising.

  44. Frances Monro says:

    Hi, David. I am a woman born 9th November 1953. I had various jobs in the U.K. while I was a student between about 1968 and 1976, when I moved to Canada. I returned to the U.K. between 1985 and 1987 to do a Master’s degree and worked part-time throughout this period. Because I only worked full time for a relatively short period, I have no idea how many years of pension I accumulated in total. How do I find out and can/should I top my pension up at this point? I retired in Canada at the end of 2013.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Frances, your UK pension date is 6th November 2018, so you have time to make more contributions if you wish. You will need 10 years to qualify for a minimum pension. With part time employment, in order to make a year qualify, you have to have earned over a certain amount (and had NI deducted) for that year. For example, for 2014, if you earned above £5,772 during the year, that year would qualify as a full year for pension purposes. For the years you worked part time, if you earned more than the minimum for that year, then it would qualify. The Department of Works and pensions would have your record of employment and contributions, and can tell you how many qualifying years you have.
      If you join us, we will send you a package of information on what to do next, plus how to make voluntary contributions and the rules for making Class 2 voluntary contributions, which is much cheaper. It is definitely worth your while to pursue this further, as you might well be eligible, and you still have time to catch up

      • Frances Monro says:

        I think my pension date is 2016m isn’t it?

        • David Morris says:

          hello Frances, no your date is November 2018 (if your DOB is November 1953). The pension age for women has been steadily increasing, and will reach 66 in the next few years.

  45. Arthur Faria says:

    I am American and retired in the United States. However, because my daughter lives in the UK I would like to move there and would like to know if I would be entitled to anything from the UK government based on the reciprocity agreement there is between the US and UK.

    Thank you

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Arthur, the short answer is that I am not familiar with the UK/US reciprocal agreement. I know that contributions in either country can count towards a pension in the other, but you can’t collect two pensions. If you are already retired and collecting social security pension, it is very unlikely that you will also qualify for a UK one

  46. Ekaterina Gancheva says:

    Dear David,

    My name is Ekaterina Gancheva. I worked in the UK from December 2003 to August 2010 as an employee. After that I came back to my country – Bulgaria and currently I live and work here and it is the same situation for my husband, too. We plan to stay and work here hopefully till we are alive. My date of birth is 27.09.1976 and my husband’s is: 04.07.1977. I want to know are we going to be eligible for some sort of pension in UK, when the time comes? Thank you for your cooperation in advance!!!

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Ekaterina, as you live in the EU, your pension rights are governed by EU treaty. This means that any work in the UK will be counted towards your pension. When you apply in Bulgaria for your pension, they will contact the UK and include any UK work as part of your pension calculation. You can not apply for a UK pension separately while you live in the EU

  47. Georgina Wilson says:

    Hi
    I was born in Canada 1957 and attended one school year in the UK (British Mother) with remaining time in Canada. I just received British Citizenship in 2015 through my British mother now that the laws changed. (used to be only through Father) I am now living in the UK since 2014 although not working as yet.

    Can I buyback some years of British pension and be able to obtain a small pension at retirement?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Georgina, no you can’t buy back any years. You have to be living in the UK for at least 3 years, and you need to have a National Insurance number. I am not fully up to date on the rules for pensions and other benefits if you live in the UK. We focus here on the rules for expats living abroad. You should contact your local Government services office

  48. Dave Hornby says:

    Hi David
    I was born in 1953 emigrated in 1979, I’ve received my estimate for the voluntary NIC class 3 payments and want to forward my first payment for years 2006/07. Where should I send the money order?
    Hope you can help.

    Thanks

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Dave, if you are a member, all that information is contained in your membership package. You may also be eligible to make Class 2 payments, which are much cheaper. If you aren’t a member, you should join us. We will give you a complete information package, and you will be helping us fight to get your pension indexed to inflation

  49. Sophia McArthur says:

    I am South African and my late husband and I were going to move to England he was a British citizen but unfortunately he passed away last year in August. He was 11/12 years old when his family left England so he never worked there and I think he was not entitled to any pension and nor will I be entitled to any is this correct? If I go live in the UK will I be able to buy any pension back or not?

    Thank you

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Sophia, no he was not entitled to a UK State pension. If you went to live in the UK, you would not be able to buy back any years at this point. Sorry

  50. Hi, My mom was born in Scotland in 1938. She worked until she left in 1963 to the US and has lived in the US ever since. Is she eligible for a state pension? If she is, do you have any guidance on how she would apply? Thank you

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Mandy, your mother would need to have worked 10 years in the UK in order to be eligible. You would have to find out what age she started work, and how many years she worked.

      • Hi David, My mom said she worked for 9 years, from 16 to 25 when she left. I was reading that you could pay in to top off if you didn’t have enough credits. Would that apply to my mom? Thank you very much for your assistance. Mandy

        • David Morris says:

          Hello Mandy, unfortunately, it is too late for your mother to buy back any years. It may be worth applying anyway, because she is so close.

  51. Dave Martin says:

    Hi Dave,
    I was born in 1954 in the UK, worked for local authority until 1987 and now reside in Canada.
    I have been wrestling with the local Govt. Pension Fund who advised me 3 weeks before I was 60 that if I wanted to transfer my LGPS pension it had to be done before I was 60?
    However should I get approximately 15/30ths government pension?
    Thanks
    Dave

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Dave, I can’t help you with the occupational pension, as they are all different, but you are certainly entitled to a partial UK state pension. You also have time to make additional voluntary contributions. You reach state pension age in 2019, and will need 35 years to get the maximum. If you have less than 35, it is just prorated eg 15/35ths

  52. David Hatton says:

    My wife was born on Feb 19, 1950 and worked in England for five and a half years before we emigrated to Canada.

    Is she eligible for a UK pension?

    Thank You, David

    • David Morris says:

      Hello David, your wife reached pension age in February 2010. Because of that, she is in the category where she needed 10 years of eligible contributions. If she had been born in April 1950, she would only need 1.
      It looks like she would not be eligible. However, it would not hurt to enquire. It could depend on when she started work. You normally get two years credit from age 16 to 18, plus what ever years were worked. She would have 6 from her working years, plus maybe 2, and she may still be able to buy back 2. It could be close.

  53. My dad passed away October 2014, he had lived in canada over 40 years and moves here when he was 24, he was getting a British pension, do I have to claim that at income tax time when I’m doing his taxes?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Angela, legally you are required to report all income from any source on Canadian income tax returns.

  54. Hello, I was born in the UK in 1955, attended university in Scotland (1972-1976) and in Canada (1976 – 1979) then married a Canadian and returned to Canada permanently in 1979. I worked a few monthe every summer in the UK while at Schoold and University and again for a few months in 1979. I have worked in Canada since 1980. I have a UK State Pension statement that says I have 3 qualifying years. Do you think I would I qualify to make additional Class 2 or 3 voluntary contributions and receive a UK pension? Would it be worthwhile?
    Thanks,
    Mary

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Mary, you will reach UK pension age in 2021, and will need 10 years to qualify for a partial pension. You still have time to make voluntary contributions to get you there, and you are entitled to do that. Financially it is definitely worth it. You can make Class 3 contributions, and may be eligible for Class 2, which is cheaper.
      If you join us, we will send you a package of info on how to make voluntary payments, and details on how to qualify for Class 2

  55. John E Asher says:

    I was born in england 1961, I left to move to Canada in Feb 1989. I worked in England for 11 years, am I entitled to a UK pension? My wife was also born in 1961 and worked for 9 years before we emigrated to Canada will she be entitled to a UK pension?

    John E Asher

    • David Morris says:

      Hello John, yes you are entitled to a partial pension. You only need 10 years to qualify and you have 11. Your wife likely needs 1 more year of contributions to qualify. The good news is that you are able to make voluntary contributions from abroad to the NI system in the UK, which will allow you to increase your pension entitlement.
      This is definitely worth doing from a financial perspective

      • Arun Patel says:

        Hello John / David,
        I just want to add to David’s response. To qualify for a full UK pension you need 30 years of contribution to the pension fund. However, if you have less than that then you have an option to increase your pension by voluntary pension each year until the year you turn 65 (laws keeps changing for qualifying years as well as retirement age). If you do not pay voluntary pension then you will get 1/30th times the number of years that you have contributed while you were working.
        Write to pension office for pension estimate and they will tell you how much you need to pay for voluntary amount. (give your National Insurance # if possible) Also, there are 2 classes of voluntary pensions (class 2 & class 3). Class 2 is lot cheaper than class 3 contributions. The only stipulation is that you have to be working overseas. (I am not sure where you are). Once you correspond with them they will write to you for what class you qualify.
        Hope this helps.

      • John E Asher says:

        What would the payments per year be and how many would be optimum?

        • David Morris says:

          Hello John, the payments differ depending on whether you have to pay Class 3, or can qualify for Class 2. The Pension dept doesn’t advertise that you can pay Class 2, so you have to ask for it, and you have to meet their criteria. Every payment you make buys you 1 extra year of pension eligibility. It is a good financial deal, so you should buy as many as you can afford, up to the maximum.

  56. Hello David ,

    I am born 04 August 1970 Lithuanian .I am working in Scotland 5-6 months a year(seasonal job) since 2006 every year and paying NI .Do I qualify for a pension and how to count qualifying years if i am working only 5-6 months a year ?

    Thank You ,Virgis

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Virgis, you live in an EU country where pensions are harmonized. That means that any work credits you have in any EU country get credited towards an EU pension. In the UK if you worked for 6 months, you would have reached the threshold where it counts as a full year.

    • John Byrne says:

      Hello David,

      I was born 12/05/1948 and worked in UK FOR 2 years September 1967 to August 1969 .I am receiving Irish state

      pension but have not claimed the small pension to date from UK .Before I try I would like to know if my wife would be

      eligible for any pension from UK even though she has never worked there ,her dob is 22/01/1950 also how does one

      go about buying back years.

      • David Morris says:

        Hello John, your wife should be eligible to receive a pension equal to 60% of yours. To be honest though, if you live in Ireland, you come under EU rules for pensions. These rules affect anyone living in the EU who worked in other EU countries. I am not familiar with how these rules operate, so I can’t say for sure what your wife would be eligible for.

        • john o hagan says:

          hello david thank you for your fast replay we are not maried she gets she gets some uk pension of her own right paid into our bank here in ireland i also get mine but how do we go about things when we return to the uk regarding our pensions?thank you John

          • David Morris says:

            Hello John (O Hagan), I am not sure I understand your question. If you are already getting a UK pension paid in Ireland, you simply advise the pension department of your new address in the UK when you move there.

          • john o hagan says:

            thank you david John

  57. My birth date is December 26, 1948. I worked in England from July 1965 to May 1974. Do I only need one year to be eligible for a pension? Also, I have some information that says it would cost 700 GPB per year to buy additional years? Would that be worth it?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Phil, yes, you only need 1 year to qualify. £700 is the class 3 rate to but an additional year. The class 2 rate is only £150, and you may qualify for that. Even at £700 I believe it is still worth it. 1 year of extra pension at 2014 rates gets you almost £200 a year extra pension, so the £700 gets paid back in 3.5 years. After the 3.5 years, you are ahead.

  58. mengshan zhang says:

    Hello I am Chinese by birth but in 2007 I married an Englishman, and live in the uk I am now over 63 yrs old Am I entitled to a uk ol;d age persons

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Mengshan, if you live in the UK, I can’t really help you. You should contact your local pension office. We are set up here to support people not living in the UK, who might be entitled to a pension

    • Chris K says:

      Hi David,
      I am currently a UK citizen residing in Singapore. Although I have not lived in the UK for 25 years I have been making voluntary NI contributions under Class 2 and will have more than 30 years contributions. If I become a Singapore citizen and give up my UK citizenship,will I still be eligible for my UK pension when reaching pensionable age ? If so will it be frozen or will it be indexed ? And can I receive it in Singapore ?

      • David Morris says:

        Hello Chris, you do not need to be a UK citizen to receive your pension and it is payable anywhere in the world. Unfortunately, in Singapore it will be frozen.

  59. John Dorman says:

    Hello David,

    I left school in 1967 and went to college for a year before beginning my apprenticeship in 1968. I received a bursary while in college but don’t remember if I paid towards my pension during that year. After finishing my apprenticeship I continued to work until coming to Canada in 1974. I will be pension age in November 2016 and wondered if it is too late for me to catch up to qualify for minimum pension.
    Thank you in advance.

    John

    • David Morris says:

      Hello John, you will need 10 years to qualify for a minimum pension. It looks like you probably have 6 already, and you can certainly buy back up to 6 years, so it is not too late to qualify. You should pursue this right away though.

  60. Inge Moore says:

    Hello -

    I am a woman born in October 1950. I will be 65 this year. I am Canadian, living in Canada, and I worked in England for approximately two years, some time between 1972 and 1974. Am I eligible for a pension from England and how do I get one if I am?

    Thanks,

    Inge

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Inge, you may be eligible for a very small partial pension. You will not be able to make voluntary contributions to add to it, though. You need to track down your National Insurance number as a first step.
      If you join us, we can tell you how to go about doing that.

      • Hello, I was Born in England in 1957 and worked approx 3 years there before leaving for Switzerland where I am Today.
        Do I have any tax return for those three years, i never even thought about it till now.
        Kinds Regards Carol.

        • David Morris says:

          Hello Carol, no – providing you were not self employed, you do not need to prepare a tax return for the years in the UK.

  61. I am UK citizen resident in Canada since 1980. Will qualify for full pension this year.Am a grateful CABP member.The non indexation will soon cause me concern. Should I decide to join my daughter in a fully indexed country ( not UK ) what do I do to receive the indexed pension ?

  62. Hi. I worked in the UK (scotland) for 4 years, then moved out of the EU. Can i get entitlement for a UK pension if i pay the 143£ x 26 (for 26 years to make the total 30)?
    I dont know if its important to note that i also worked in Germany for about a year.
    My birth date April 1971 and currently living in the seychelles.
    Thnx.
    AB

    • David Morris says:

      Hello AB, you will need 10 years to qualify for a partial pension, and 35 for a full. You are able to make voluntary contributions going forward, and you can also make 6 back payments. You reach pension age in 2038 so you can make approx. 23 payments going forward, plus 6 retroactive, plus the 4 you already have. That should give you 33, which is pretty close to the full pension.
      The rate you pay for these contributions will either be Class 2 or class 3. The rules on Class 2 are quite strict. If you join us, we can provide you with a package of information on how to get started, including how to qualify for class 2

  63. Hi,

    I was born in 1977. Moved to UK in 2005 and now a UK citizen. I worked there from 2005 to 2014. Since April 2014 I have moved to US.

    So effectively I have paid just under 9 years of NI. I have paid some more recently because of some income I received in Jan 2015. I understand UK and USA have some bilateral social security agreement. Please can you help me understand what should I be doing in future to protect my long term pension?

    Thanks
    NG

    • David Morris says:

      Hello NG, the UK and the US have a reciprocal agreement where contributions to a UK pension can count towards the US Social security. You have the choice of using your UK contributions that way, or of claiming a UK pension and US Social Security separately. I can’t tell you which is the better option, as it depends on whether your contributory years in the UK will produce a better Social security amount, than if you claimed them separately.

  64. Carole McNamara says:

    I worked in UK from Jan 1973 until May 2187, then move to US. Born in 57 I just found out that I now have to wait until I am 65 to claim pension. That’s great notice for someone 2 years aways from expecting benefits. Anyway would my US husband, who has never worked in UK be eligible for any benefits a) when he reaches retirement age (he’s the same age as me), and b) could he claim my benefits if I die before the new retirement age, and c) is he eligible for a spousal benefit when we both come “of age”. Finally, do you have to have a UK bank account for it to be paid into?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Carole, your husband will not be entitled to any UK pension. Nor will he be entitled to any benefits derived from you, if you should die at any time. You do not need a UK bank account. Your pension can be paid electronically directly into a bank in the US

  65. linda Ashley says:

    I was born in England and paid into the NI for five years. But have lived overseas for 30 years. Between the US, Bahamas and the Turks and Cacaos Islands. Not spending more then 6 months in one place.
    Now I am 55. I was born in 1960.
    I am married to a US citizen but have only a UK passport and no paper work for the US as we have never lived there .

    Looking on the NI pension website I think I can paid gaps in my NI to up to 6 years . Then pay about 700 pound a year into NI Under the class 3 NI pension for people who live overseas.
    I have never worked over seas.

    Is this right and do I only have until April of this year to pay a 6 year gap???

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Linda, yes, you can make voluntary contributions from overseas. You do not have to be working. You have 6 years to pay any given year, so for 2014, you have until 2020 to pay for that year. That means you can go back 6 years and pay for 2008/2009. Next year you can pay for 2009/2010. You will need 10 years to qualify for a minimum pension

  66. Hello, I am a paid-up member of CABP (32611) and was hoping you could answer these questions for me. First, here is the background information

    - My date of birth is 16th March 1951.
    - I presently have 28 qualifying years of NIC.
    - I plan to buy a final qualifying year this year – before I reach pensionable age.
    - I have already purchased the maximum number of past years I can, so (I’m told) cannot reach 30 qualifying years

    - My wife’s date of birth is 14th January 1953.
    - We were married in 2014.
    - She has never paid any NICs and is a Canadian citizen.

    My questions are:
    - will my wife be entitled to a Category B pension?
    - if yes, what rate will the Category B pension be set at?
    - and finally, if yes, at what date will she be entitled to draw this pension?

    Very sincere thanks for your assistance in this matter – Rik

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Rik, thanks for joining us. Yes, your wife is entitled to a Category B pension. It will be approx. 60% of whatever your pension is. She will be able to apply for it when you both reach pension age. Your date is March 2016, and her date is November 2015. So, once you reach pension age you can both apply. She will actually have to apply, it doesn’t happen automatically

  67. martina cunningham says:

    Im not english. I worked in england for 1 and a half years from sep 1987 until feb 1989 and i paid tax and everything. i was born in 1967 just wondering would i qualify for anything.

  68. Hi. I worked in the UK (scotland) for 4 years, then moved out of the EU. Can i get entitlement for a UK pension if i pay the 143£ x 26 (for 26 years to make the total 30)?
    I dont know if its important to note that i also worked in Germany for about a year.
    Thnx.
    AB

  69. Hi . I am an English Citizen who was born 11/27/1966.
    I worked from age 18 till 22 going to college from ages 22 to 25 working for another 18 months before moving to America.
    Can I ask if I am able to get a pension , and am I eligible to buy make voluntary contributions.
    Many thanks

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Doug, yes, you would be entitled to a UK pension if you have 10 years contributions. You are able to make voluntary contributions from anywhere in the world, so you can certainly reach that minimum by making those contributions. It is a great financial deal to do that.

      • David . Many thanks for the reply. It is much appreciated.
        So lets say I have 6/7 years at present , the first thing is to get to the minimum of 10 years by making voluntary payments . is that correct ?
        Given that I am 48 , what is the maximum amount of voluntary contributions I could make to take me from the minimum of 10/30 ths of a pension as close to getting a full.
        Lastly how can I find out whether I am Class 1 / 2/3.
        Many thanks
        Doug

        • David Morris says:

          hello Doug, yes, you don’t want to let your 6 or 7 years be wasted, so your should get to 10 at least.
          Your pension age is 66 and you will need 35 years for the maximum pension. You can contribute going forward for approx. 18 years, and you can buy back 6, so that should get you to approx. 33 years, which is pretty close to a full pension. The default option for you is Class 3, but you may be able to qualify for class 2, which is much cheaper. If you join us, we will send yo an information package that details all of that. It is really useful information

  70. Mari Arjona says:

    I am 39 years old and have worked in the UK from Dec 2010 to Feb 2010.. I am about to move out of the UK and not really thinking of coming back. I am elegible to a UK pension
    Thanks for your time

  71. Hi

    I was born in the UK. My parents left when i was two years old. if i return to the UK will i need a work permit and what would i if any would be entitle to. i would like to return and begin working.

    Regards Ian

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Ian, I can”t help you with questions about work permits. I can only help with questions about UK pensions for expats. You are not currently entitled to any UK pension. If you go back to the UK and work, you can build entitlement to one.

  72. Tony de Castro says:

    Hello,

    I was not born in the UK, but I lived there for +/- 8 years and worked and paid tax for about 5 years. I was born in 1956. Can you please confirm my status, whether I am entitled to anything with extra contributions and the best way to proceed? Also, my wife did not live or work in the UK. Is she entitled to anything as per the legislation?

    Thanks for your invaluable service.

    Tony

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Tony, you will need 10 years to qualify for a partial UK pension. The good news is that you are still able to make voluntary contributions which will get you there. Your wife will not be entitled to any UK pension because of the new legislation. The best way to proceed is to join us. We will send you an information package on how to get started. You need to find out your NI number to start with, and then apply to make voluntary payments. We can help with how to do that.

  73. Denis Andrew John Corne says:

    Dear Sir
    I was born in the UK on 18/02/1946. After leaving school at 15 I worked continuously in the UK until 1978. I moved to Holland and now reside in South Africa. I have been trying to establish if I will receive a partial Old Age Pension but was not able to complete the required forms because I could not supply my National Insurance number. I have now managed to discover my N I number and would like to find out my options could you please help with the following.

    1 Having reached the retirement age 4 years ago what is the approx. amount that I shall receive in back payments over the last 4 years.

    2. What much would I need to contribute to pay to boost the pension to a full 30 year entitlement. Can I use the owed back payment towards that contribution should I want to do so.

    Thank you
    Denis

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Denis, it looks like you have about 16 years of contributions. That will entitle you to 16/30ths of a full pension. In todays terms a full pension is £113 a week, so 16/30ths of that is £60 a week. You can elect to have an increased weekly pension, or a lump sum. The lump sum should be about 4 years worth of pension, or roughly £12,000.
      Unfortunately, at this stage, you are only able to make 1 or 2 voluntary payments, so you are not able to get to 30. It is too late to make any more than a couple of payments.

  74. Davis:

    Both my husband and I worked in England from May 1976 to May 1998 and made out contributions for those 2 years. What would we be eligible for? My husband was born August 16, 1951 and I was born March 26, 1953

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Jennifer. I presume you mean you worked to May 1978, not 98. You only need 1 year of contributions, as you reach pension age in March 2016. That means you do qualify for a partial pension, and you have the ability to buy back 6 years to increase it. Your husband unfortunately reaches pension age in Aug 2016, so he comes under the new legislation where he will need 10 years to qualify for a minimum pension. He might just make it, as he will have two years of credits from age 16 to 18, plus the two years he worked, plus he can buy back 6 years. That should give him the 10 he needs.
      You need to act quickly though, to make sure you can still buy back the years you need.

      • David:

        Yes, I mean 1978. We are not residents of the UK. My husband was on a 2 year work permit from 1976 to 1978 and I was on full time permanent employment also. That is why I wanted to know if we do qualify for any pension or benefits.

        Thanks,

      • David:

        Can you please send me the details on how to apply by email so that I can apply for my partial pension?

        Thanks,

        • David Morris says:

          HI Jennifer, if you join us, we will send you the complete package of information, including how to make voluntary contributions

      • Stephanie down says:

        Dear David,
        My husband was born in 1.4.51 in uk and worked part time for 5 years post college. I was born19.8.51 in uk.
        I worked for 4 yrs full time ……9.69- 2.72. and we have lived and worked in Australia ever since .
        From your information I believe that I would qualify for 4/30 of the pension, is that so?…….would my husband get some also?

        • David Morris says:

          Hello Stephanie, yes, you qualify for a partial pension which would be 4/30ths. You still have time to buy back a couple of years. Your husband also just makes it under the wire of the new legislation, and only needs 1 year. He also has time to buy some additional years. I am assuming that when he worked part time his employer made NI deductions. (If it was cash under the table, then he wouldn’t have an NI record, and wouldn’t qualify.)

  75. Jim Purdie says:

    Hi,

    Born : September, 1950

    Worked : 1966 to 1976

    Could you tell me how to proceed ?

    Thanks,

    Jim

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Jim, you are entitled to a partial UK state pension when you reach pension age this year. You are also able to make up to 6 additional voluntary contributions, which will bring you up to over 50% of a full pension. You should pursue this as soon as possible. My best suggestion is to join us. We will send you a complete package on how to get started, including making voluntary contributions.

  76. Janette Johnson says:

    Hi,
    I was born in July 1955 in the UK.
    I worked in the NHS from 1972 until 1992, when I emigrated to California. I also paid into the Superannuation fund. Would I be eligible for a pension? Are there laws governing transfers into the USA?
    Thanks for your help.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Janette, you will certainly be entitled to a UK state pension when you reach pension age in 2021. I can’t comment about the Superannuation fund, as that is basically a private pension, but you very likely are entitled to a pension from that too. You can’t transfer the UK state pension, but it is payable anywhere in the world, so you can have it paid into a bank account in the US. You can also make additional voluntary contributions to the UK state pension to get you close to a full pension. This is financially a great deal.
      If you join us, we will email you a package on what to do next, and how to make voluntary contributions if you want to.

  77. Frank Rogan says:

    I was born in England in 1937 and my wife in 1942. I worked for 5yrs and my wife for 10yrs prior to emigrating to Canada
    We are now both pensioners receiving CPP and OAS. We both received Superannuation payments before we left England. Do we qualify for any form of support? Many thanks for you valuable service.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Frank, unfortunately you do not qualify as you needed 11 years of work to reach the minimum level. However your wife only needed 10, so it is quite possible that she has enough contributions for a partial pension. It would certainly be worth while exploring that.

  78. Hello,
    I’m not British. Born in April 1981, I lived and worked in the UK between January 2007 and January 2010, then relocated to Canada in Feb 2010. I was just a bit curious about where I currently stand pension-wise. Will I be better off transferring my contributions to a Canadian RRSP?

    Thanks a lot for any light you can shed.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Francis, citizenship doesn’t matter. The only thing that matters is if your employer made NI contributions while you worked there. You will need 10 years of credits, though, and you don’t have enough yet. The good news is that you can make voluntary contributions even from Canada. It is a good financial deal to do that.
      You can not transfer any previous contributions to a Canadian RRSP, so you either have to make some more voluntary contributions in the UK to get you to a minimum of 10, or lose the ones you already made.

  79. Arthur Lane says:

    Hi I was born in UK 1954 I started work on leaving school 1971 worked till 1976 in UK then had 2 years in NZ, worked again 1978 – 1982 in UK, returned to NZ, worked again 1987 – 1988 in UK, I returned to UK 2013 to operate my own business I proposed to return back to Australia 2016 will I be entitled to any pension?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Arthur, yes you will be entitled to a partial UK pension (presuming that when you worked in the UK, your employer made NI deductions). You also still have time to make voluntary contributions to increase the pension

  80. Larry Dias says:

    19th Feb 2015

    Hello -

    Born Nov 4th. 1948. Came to UK in Sept 1969.
    First worked in the UK in December 1969, then appx 4 months every year until May 1973, followed by full time employment from Oct 1973 through Nov 1978. Then I left the UK and never worked there after that.
    Am I entitled to any UK pension benefits ? If I have to make up to qualify for 10 years of credits how should I set about ?

    Many thanks

    Larry

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Larry, yes, you are entitled to a partial UK pension. You only needed 1 year to qualify. You still have time to buy a few extra years to increase your pension amount. It will also be backdated to when you turned 65. If you join us, we will send you a package of information on what to do next. The first step is to find your National Insurance number. We will tell you how to do that, and how to make any voluntary payments.

      • Larry Dias says:

        Hello David -

        I was not aware of these. Thank you for these great tips.

        I looked into joining your organization.
        Is it open only to Canadian and British citizens ? I am neither.
        I am a citizen of Sri Lanka.
        Also, what is the difference between ‘International Membership’ and ‘International Electronic Membership’ ?

        Many thanks

        Larry

        • David Morris says:

          Hello Larry, our membership is open to everyone. We have members from all over the world.
          The only difference between International and International Electronic is how you receive our quarterly magazine Justice. If you opt to receive it via email then the cost is less. If we have to mail it physically to you, the cost is a little more.

  81. Hi. I was born in N.I. in June 1950 and worked there for nearly 6 years between 1965 and 1973. In November 1973, I came to Australia with my Australian husband. Am I eligible for a part UK pension? Thank you. Kind regards. June

    • David Morris says:

      Hello June, yes you should be eligible. You are of the age that only needed 1 year to qualify for a minimum pension. The good news is that your pension will be backdated to July 2010, so you can either take a lump sum, or an increased monthly amount going forward. If you join, we will give you an information package on getting started.

    • Hi, my husband and I came to Australia early 1985. My husband passed away in Australia 10.4.2013. He worked full time in UK approx from 1961 to 1984. His d.o.b 28/3/46. I also worked in UK full time from 1971 to 1984. My d.o.b. 23/4/56. Problem is I do not have our National Insurance numbers. Am I entitled to any of his pension and /or my own pension when I reach retirement age? Easiest way to get National Insurance number?? (When we came to Australia, my husband continued to work for the same company) I need help! Thankyou

      • David Morris says:

        Hello Janet. You reach pension age in 2022, and will need 10 years to qualify for a minimum pension. You have that already, so you do qualify. You also have the right to make additional voluntary contributions which will increase your pension amount. You also be entitled to some bereavement benefits, but you will not be entitled to any pension based on your husbands NI record, only your own.
        My best suggestion is for you to join us. We will send you an information package, including how to get your NI number, and to apply for a pension forecast statement

        • Thank you David. Very helpful. I will join so that I can get the information I need. Do you mail this or email this? Do you have any idea what the bereavement benefits may be? Thanks in advance.

          • David Morris says:

            Hello Janet, we will email the information package to you. You should be eligible for a bereavement allowance until you reach pension age yourself. The exact amount will be based on your husbands NI contributions, and will be calculated by DWP. You would have been entitled also to a 1 time bereavement payment of £2,000, but there is a 12 month time limit on applying for that, and you are probably too late for that

  82. Erika Savic (maiden name Biber) says:

    Hello,
    I was born in 1935 and I am a Canadian citizen. From May 26/1954 to July 6/1955 I worked in London in a hospital. My only proof of ever having worked in England before my marriage are 2 written work references I kept from the matron and the deputy-matron of that hospital.I do not remember if any NI was deducted from my weekly pay cheque stub.
    Would I be eligible for a small pension from the UK?
    Before I found employment at this hospital I also worked another 2-3 month for a convent in Mayfield, Sussek, UK, but I strongly doubt that they enrolled me into the NI system.
    I would appreciate hearing your advice on the above. Thank you in advance.
    Erika

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Erika, unfortunately, you are not entitled to a UK pension. You are of the age group that need 10 years of work experience in the UK, and it is now too late to buy back any years. Sorry

  83. rosalind archbold says:

    dob 12/27/1950, worked 1966-1973, 1977-1980, i have 9/30th’s i have not claimed my uk pension to see if have enough years. can i claim 9/30ths and get a lump sum for the years i did not claim? also my husband 65 12/10/15 when he claims his would i be entitled to a top up from his contributions he will get 26/30ths, we live in usa. thanks

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Rosalind, yes, you are entitled to a partial UK pension, and it will be prorated based on the number of years you have. It will also be backdated to September 11, and you can claim either a lump sum back to then, or an increased monthly pension going forward. You will also be entitled to a top up based on your husbands contributions to bring you up to 60% of his pension. If you join us, we can help you get started.

  84. David,
    I have just turned 65, December 2014. I worked in the UK 1966 through to 1972 and then emigrated to Canada. I applied for eligiblity and have been making Class 2 contributions for several years. I have now 27/30th qualifying years. My question is can I make contributions to make up the 3 years necessary for a full pension? I have my own business and have no intent of retiring therefore if I can make these extra payments will I be eligible to paying Class 2 for these 3 remaining years?

    • David Morris says:

      hello Jeff, you can not contribute for any additional years once you reach pension age. If you have not already caught up on years prior to 2014, you have up to 6 years to pay for those at whatever rate you were paying. If you are fully caught up, you can’t contribute for any year after 2014.
      There is one other option where if you have 20 years already, they will offer you the opportunity to buy up to 6 more years, but it would be only at the Class 3 rate. You may have to ask them about this, as they don’t always offer it.

      • David,

        Thanks for your reply. I have just joined CABP in order to support the organisation.

        Looking through my correspondence with British Inland Revenue I see that there could be an opportunity to add to my 27 qualifying years but I think I need to scan and send this to you for confirmation.

        How do I do this, what email address could I send it to?

        Regards, Jeff

  85. jim Packer says:

    Hi David

    I was born April 61 and worked in the UK from 1977 to 2004 (27 years) when I emigrated to Canada. I am trying to find out how much of the English pension I am able to claim at retirement age.

    Thanks, Jim

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Jim, you will need 35 years to qualify for a full UK pension. If you have less than 35, then it is simply prorated based on the number of years you do have. With 27, you would get 27/35ths of the full pension. At todays rates, that would equal about £88 a week. It will be more than that when YOU reach retirement age. You are able to make voluntary payments, though, which could get you to the 35 if you wanted

  86. Hi I worked in UK from 1970 – 1976 .I now live in canada will I be eligible for a UK pension I was born in 1955 .

    Doug

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Doug, you will need 10 years of contributions to be eligible for a UK pension in 2021. You only have 6 now, but the good news is that you can make voluntary contributions to get you to the minimum – and more. It is a very good financial deal to make those contributions to get yourself a pension, so you should definitely consider it.

      • steve fisher says:

        Hi Steve here,
        Glad to say I joined last month,I really should have done so earlier.
        I’m in a very similar situation to Doug,similar age and years worked.
        Age 57 worked approx 5 years full time. (75-79)
        Questions.
        As a youth I worked part time for a local greengrocer later I worked part time at Tesco’s
        Any chance part time years might count?
        Also is 6 years the maximum I can buy retroactively?
        Because I worked full time the five years immediately before emigration, does that guarantee that class 2 contributions can be achieved?
        (I also intend to buy forward the next 8 years)
        Any other advice?

        Thank you for your time,
        Regards.

        • David Morris says:

          Hello Steve, thanks for joining us. Your part time work might count, providing they deducted NI. You don’t need to have worked the full year for it to qualify, but they do need to have deducted NI while you were there. The first step is to follow the directions that are in MYCABP to get a pension forecast. That should tell you how many years credit you already have. It should also tell you what previous years you are eligible to make payments on. In terms of Class 2, they don’t make it easy, so once you get your pension forecast, then you have to write a letter to apply to make Class 2 payments. The details of that are also in your MYCABP membership package. Provided you meet the criteria, your application for Class 2 should be good, but sometimes you have to push them a little.

  87. Hello-

    I am 26 years old filipina, we one son, married a british national and my husband passed away. He was died in uk while im in philippine, and he was left a will and on that will shows nothing for me as their childres says. does i am entitled for a pension?

    Thanks for helpine me.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Krisha, no, you would not be entitled to a UK pension.

      • Hi david-
        Sorry for my typho error message!

        In my case, i have some questions.

        I am 26 years old a filipina, married to a divorce man british nationlaity, weve been married for 3 years until he died, last year, we had one son together with me here in the philippine, what is my right as a widow and our son. On his heirs.

        His first children stating that i will never get any estates from their dad which i have never seen thru my own eyes that will testimonial.
        Could help me in my cases!

        Thank you somuch

  88. Hi David, I was born in Ireland in 1957 and worked in the UK from 1980 to 1997 (17 years). Do you know if there would be any benefit in buying more years, or even if I can?
    I believe I let the authorities know of my change of address but am not sure of who to contact now?
    Thank you for your help.
    Joe

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Joe, if you are currently living in Ireland, then your pension comes under the rules of the EU. In the EU, pensions are harmonized, which means that your work experience in the UK will be credited to your overall pension. The rules in the EU are quite complex, and we are not set up to deal with those. You should contact the pension office in Ireland, and they should be able to explain things

  89. i m not british , i worked in thr uk for 10 years ,from 1999 til 2007 , am i intitel a pension thanks

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Abel, yes. You do not have to be british. You just have to have worked in the UK. With 10 years work there, you are entitled to a UK pension

  90. Joan Wood says:

    I was born in England in 1946, I worked from 1960 to 1965,I emigrated to Australia in 1969,
    am I entitled to a part British pension

    thanks, Joan Wood

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Joan, unfortunately, you are of the age group that needs 10 years of NI contributions. It is also now too late for you to buy back any years, so you don’t qualify. Sorry

      • Joan Wood says:

        thank you for your very quick reply. I didnt think I was eligible but everyone kept saying I needed to apply,
        thanks again
        Joan

  91. Chris Bretton says:

    Hi David

    I was born Dec 27 1953 in Barnsley sth Yorks. I worked in England 1970 to 1975 (5yrs) left for South Africa and returned to England working Jan 1979 to October 79. At this point we emigrated to Canada where we currently reside.
    Will I qualify for any British pension with all these changing rules.
    Tks

    Chris

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Chris. You reach pension age in 2018, and will need 10 years to qualify. It looks like you have 6 already, so only need another 4. You still have time to make some catchup payments which will get you there, so yes – you can become eligible for a partial pension, providing you start now with some voluntary contributions

  92. Henry Finnis says:

    Hello David. I served as an officer in the Royal Navy from Jan 1968 to Jul 1982 when I emigrated to Australia. I am now 65 and receive a relatively small pension in respect of my Royal Navy service. Am I now also entitled to a UK State pension in respect of the 14 years of National Insurance contributions I would have made while serving in the Royal Navy and, if so, to whom should I apply?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Henry, yes, your military service counts towards NI contributions. You are entitled to a state pension based on those years, in addition to your navy pension. You would apply to the Dept of Works and Pensions. If you join us, we can send you a package of information on how to get started, and whether you can still make some voluntary contributions to increase your pension.

  93. Tim Allison says:

    Dear David.
    I was born 12 Feb 1958 in England and worked from September 1974 to september 1979 before emigrating to Canada. Would I be eligible for a UK pension. Would I have to top up my contributions?. If so how much would it be and how do I apply.
    Thanks
    Tim

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Tim, yes, you could be eligible for a partial UK state pension. You will need 10 years, so you aren’t there yet, but you can make voluntary contributions to top it up that will get you there easily. You reach pension age in 2024, so you can make at least 9 going forward, plus 6 catchup. That will give you almost 2/3 of a full pension

  94. david small says:

    I was born in Scotland in 1940, worked from 1956 to 1962 and then left for New Zealand. I now lived in Canada. I receive a small amount of a work pension from the UK. Would I be eilgible for any old age pension from the UK? If so, how would I apply?

    Thanks from Nova Scotia, Canada

    David Small

    • David Morris says:

      Hello David, unfortunately no. You needed 11 years of work contributions to qualify, and it is now too late to buy back any years. Sorry

  95. susan barker says:

    hello i was wondering if you could clarify something for me i went 60 in april 2014 and since nov 2014 i haven’t been paying N.I. i work 40 hrs per week, i have asked payroll dept and they told me that they had recieved a certificate to say i don’t have to pay it,but my employer does is this correct as i don’t want to be getting a huge bill for N.I. PAYMENTS thankyou

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Susan, am I correct in assuming you are currently employed in the UK ? If so, I can’t really help you as we are set up to handle questions from people living abroad, and I am not up to date on the employment rules in the UK. My guess would be that if your employer has received a certificate that you don’t have to pay NI, then you don’t.

  96. John Edwards says:

    I worked in England from June 1968 to October 1974 and would like to know if I am eligible for a pension. I turned 65 in September 2013. Thanks!

    • David Morris says:

      Hello John, yes, you are entitled to a partial UK pension, and it will be backdated to September 2013.

  97. Sam Darby says:

    I worked in the UK from August 1975 to August 1985 and contributed to GRB or SERPS I think. My wife did the same but she was unemployed for a few months during that time. We now live in the USA but as we are both 62 we are wondering what we have to do to claim a pension from the UK and do we have to anything in the next couple of years to make sure this is OK?

    Thanks

    Sam

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Sam, you will reach pension age at 66 and will need 10 years of contributions. Your wife will reach pension age in 2017 (depending on her exact birthdate), and will also need 10 years to qualify for a minimum pension. The key is to make sure you both have 10 years credited, and you can do that by getting a pension forecast now. You also have the ability to make some catch up payments if you need them, or to increase your pension. If you join us, we can help you with how to do that. We provide a complete package of information, and are also always available to help our members

  98. Doreen MacLeod says:

    Hello…I was born in Glasgow September 1953. I worked from 1968 until 1984. I now live in the U.S. When and where do I apply for the British Pension please? I will be 62 this year. I do not remember my NHI number. Do I need to make any extra payments or is that only if you need the full pension?

    Thank you.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Doreen, you certainly qualify for a partial UK pension. You reach pension age in November 2017. You do not need to make any extra payments to qualify, but you can increase your pension if you do decide to do that. You would normally apply for your pension within 3 months before reaching pension age, but you can make voluntary payments at any time. If you don’t remember your NI number, all you will need is either your last address in the UK, or your last employer

  99. Susan McKevitt says:

    I was born in New Zealand in 1952. I lived and worked in the U.K. from October 1971 through June 1976 (5 years 8 months). I have been living in Canada since July 1976. Do I qualify for a UK pension or part thereof?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Susan, yes you are entitled to a partial UK pension. You only needed 1 year to qualify. You reached pension age in 2014, and you still have the opportunity to buy back 6 years to increase your pension. This is worth doing. Don’t delay in pursuing this, as you will lose the opportunity to buy back any years over time

      • Susan McKevitt says:

        Can you point me in the right direction to do this please?

        • David Morris says:

          Hi Susan, my best advice is to join us. We are non profit, campaigning to have our British Pensions indexed to inflation. You can see what we are doing elsewhere on the website.
          When you join, we will email you a package of information outlining exactly what you need to do to get started. Our office is always available to answer questions, and we keep all our members up to date on what is happening with pensions in the UK.
          You can join quickly and securely right on the website by clicking this link
          http://www.britishpensions.com/joinrenew/

  100. Joakim Nilsson says:

    Hi,

    I am a Swedish citizen, age 31 who worked in UK 2003-2004 and 2006-2008 and I wonder if I qualify for partial pension? If so, can I move it to Sweden?

    Regards
    Joakim

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Joakim, your pension situation is governed by EU pension rules, which allow for pension harmonization. That means that time spent in any EU country counts towards a pension. Therefore, any time worked in the UK counts towards a pension in Sweden. The rules are complicated, so you need to contact the pension office in Sweden

  101. Alistair McDowell says:

    Hi.

    I was born in UK in May 1961. I worked from June 1977 until June 2007, prior to moving to Canada.
    How much in contributions would I need to pay to receive full pension, when would I qualify for pension, and what would be my approximate pension per annum?
    Thanks for your help.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Alistair, you reach pension age in May 2028. You will need 35 years of contributions to have a full pension, and 10 to qualify for a minimum. I can’t tell you what the full pension amount will be in 2028. In 2014 it is £113 per week. In 2028 it will have increased by the annual inflation adjustment, and by any increases due to the new legislation in 2016

      • I thought the pension amount was frozen to the year you left the UK when you live in Canada and therefore wouldn’t increase with inflation?

        • David Morris says:

          Hello Joanne, if you live in Canada your pension is frozen from the year you first receive it, or if you are already receiving it, from the date that you moved to Canada. If you came to Canada when you were 30 (for example), when you reach pension age, your pension would be paid at todays amount. It would be frozen from that point onwards

    • I am 76 years old. I am an American citizens;I was married to a British subject from 1963-76. I worked in Edinburgh in 1963. I took time off when my children were small. I then worked in Canterbury hospital from 1971 to 1976. Am I entitlled to any government pension?

      • David Morris says:

        Hello Cynthia, you need 10 years to be eligible, however, years that you spent child raising also qualify, so you might have the 10 that you need. It is certainly worth exploring. You likely are pretty close

  102. i was born in Aug 1956 and worked part-time for 2 years and full-time for 1 yr before moving .Do i qualify for a pension?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Sheila, you reach pension age in 2022, and will need 10 years to qualify, so you do not have enough at the moment. You are still able to make voluntary contributions until 2022 though, and you can make 6 catch up payments, so you could become eligible by doing that. You still have time, but you shouldn’t delay as you will eventually lose the buy back years.

  103. Hi,i was born in March 1951 and worked from 1966-1974 and then moved to Canada .I have not made any contributions since.Do i qualify for a pension ?,if so when do i apply ?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Peter, you reach pension age in March 2016, so you just make it under the wire of the new legislation. You only need 1 year to qualify, so you have that. You do qualify for a partial pension. You can also increase your pension by making voluntary contributions now. This is definitely worth doing. You don’t actually apply for your pension until 3 months before you reach pension age, but you can make voluntary contributions at any time, and you should consider that.

  104. Mary Hawthorpe says:

    Hi
    I am 54 next month, and have worked continually since I was 18, almost 36 years, I have just finished work in December 2014 to look after my mother. Do I have enough years contributions to qualify for my full pension when I reach the age or is there anything else I need to be paying.

    Regards MAry

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Mary, under the new legislation coming in in 2016, you will need 35 years of contributions for a full pension. Sounds like you are already there. It wouldn’t hurt to apply for a pension forecast, and you will be told exactly how many years you have

  105. I am a Canadian and Australian citizen, and was born Sep 1951, so will reach pension age at Sep 2016. I worked in the UK from Jun 1977 to Dec 1981 (3 yr 4 mo). I understand that I am eligible if I buy back 7 years, at a cost of about 4900 Stg. Is it worth doing this buy-back? What will be my pension of I do this?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Gordon, the pension formula is straightforward. The full pension in 2016 is based on 35 years contributions. So, for every year you have contributed you will get 1/35 of the full pension. We don’t know what the full pension amount will be in 2016, but in 2014, 1 year of contributions buys you £196 a year in extra pension. That amount will be bigger in 2016 because of the new single tier pension rules, but we don’t know yet how big.

  106. Thank you David for this useful information
    I’m in Class 1 (born 1944) but made very few contributions, let’s say none.

    > just one voluntary payment can be made to top-up your pension contributions to meet the minimum, and only if you reach pension age in 2009/10<

    How much would I need to give as a voluntary payment to be eligible for a pension?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Alan, you are in the age group that needed 11 years to qualify for a minimum pension. If you have no contributions, then you are too late. At most, you can buy back 2 years, so you can’t reach the minimum of 11. Sorry

  107. Anne-laure hamon says:

    Hello, i worked in Wales from 1994 to 1997 and in London from 2008 to 2010. I was born in 1970. Would it be interesting for me to buy 5/6 years of contributions? Is there somewhere that I can check my situation online, as I now live in Brazil? Is there a deadline to buy thoses contributions back? Thanks for your help, best regards Anne

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Anne-laure, you need 10 years of work contributions to be eligible, but the good news is that you are able to make voluntary contributions from abroad to get you to the minimum you need. You reach pension age in 2037, so you have time to build up a substantial pension. It is worth your while to do that. You can’t check this online, but if you join us, we can tell you how to get started, and who to contact.

  108. Ken Baldwin says:

    Hi,

    Firstly thank you for providing such useful and consistent advice. Very helpful. I have quite a few years before I retire (born in 1967). I am an Irish citizen and worked fulltime in the UK for 5 years from 1991 – 1996 paying NI Contributions. I now live in Spain.

    I’m wondering if I can and if it would be worth me making contributions so as to receive a UK pension ? Any advice would be appreciated. Also do you know how much those contributions would have to be should I be elegible.

    Many thanks
    Ken

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Ken, if you live in Spain you come under the EU rules for pensions. They are harmonized, meaning any work experience in any EU country counts towards a pension. I can’t really help you with this, as the rules are complex. If you are contributing to the system in Spain, then I don’t think you need to make further contributions in the UK, but you need to check that with the pension office in Spain.

      • Ken Baldwin says:

        Thanks David. Appreciate the advice though just the thought of trying to get assistance from the pensions office here is a daunting one knowing the bureaucracy. At least I’ve given myself a few years.

  109. Hi I was born in 1953 worked from the age of 15 to 19 left work to have my first child, I had a further 2 children but worked for a short time between having the children. I then worked for approximately 3 years while the children were growing. When the children were a little older I returned to work around 7 years. I became disabled so drew disability and did some work that was suitable for that disability. I am now 62 and understanding that I should be able to draw a UK pension at the age of 63. Please can you advise how I can confirm my eligibility for for a U.K. pension. thank you Carol

  110. I was born in October 1949. I worked in the UK for 7 years before moving to the US. I have worked for 19 years in the US.

    Am I going to be able to obtain any of my UK pension?

    • David Morris says:

      Hi Heather, you are in the age group that needs 10 years of contributions. You reached pension age in 2009. You say you have 7 years of work credit. You may still be able to buy back a couple of years, so you are going to be close. What age did you start work ? You can get credit for the age 16 to 18 if you were not working. That might get you to the 10 years you need. I can’t be more specific as it will depend on the exact dates you worked, and when you started – but you are very close to qualifying. You should not delay in pursuing this, as you lose the ability to buy back years over time If you do qualify, it will be paid retroactive to 2009.

  111. Lynn Cooper says:

    I would like to know if I would qualify for England pension I live in Canada but was born in England until I was 16 years old when my mum and dad moved to Canada ,I work for a short time , could you please let me know thank you Lynn Cooper

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Lynn, it would depend on your age and how long you worked there. I need your date of birth, and the dates you worked.

  112. You mentioned earlier that a usa wife born in 1944 is eligible for 60 percent of her husband’s UK pension and can backdate it to the time that she retired. My husband born in 1949 started receiving his pension Oct 10 of 2014. They sent me an application shortly after he started receiving his benefit. In the form it asked when did I want to backdate to start receiving benefits…I wrote Oct 10th….because I thought I couldn’t go back earlier…I could only go back to the date that he started receiving benefits…even though I am 5 years older than him. Is that correct? I don’t know the name of the form that I filled out…I’m assuming that it is a request for spousal benefits or why would they have asked me when did I want to backdate the start of the pension. Is this common for then to automatically send out application to the wife? I hope that is what I filled out and sent in. Thanks for your help.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Carol, yes, you are correct. You can only go back to the date when you both have reached pension age, so that would be Oct 2014. You need to actually apply for the pension, it wont happen automatically. Yes, they do send it out, so It sounds like you filled out the right form.

  113. Belinda Barnes says:

    Good Morning….I will be 49 in May. Born and worked in the UK from 1984 to 1993 when I moved to USA, and am still in the USA. Can you explain how I would pay my voluntary contributions, how many years to I owe and which bracket I fall under? Thx Belinda Barnes

  114. Belinda Barnes says:

    Hello.
    I am 49 this year. Lived in USA for 20 years, born in the UK and worked from the age of 16 to 26 there. How and what is the best way to contribute in the system so I can qualify for UK pension? Thanks!

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Belinda, my best suggestion is for you to join us. We will give you a complete package of information on how to get started. We are also available to help on an ongoing basis, and we keep our members informed of all changes to the pension rules that affect them

    • Belinda Barnes says:

      One quick question… You do assist ex-pats living in the USA and not just Canada, correct?

  115. Stewart M Duncan says:

    Hi, I just read this page today. I am a British, I am staying in Indonesia now. I was born on 22 March 1949 and had worked in UK for few years. I do not have the document to prove that I had been working in UK. I had stroke in 1998 while I was working overseas. Can I claim the state pension and how to do it ? Thks

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Stewart, you reached pension age in March of 2014. The good news is that you only needed 1 year of work in the UK to qualify for a partial pension. You also are able to buy back 6 years, which will increase your pension.
      All you will need is the name of your last employer in the UK, or the last address you lived at. The Government will be able to tell you your NI numbers, and then you use that to claim your pension and make any catch up payments.
      If you join us, we will tell you how to do all this – but don’t delay, because you don’t want to lose the option of making those back payments

  116. I am a female and a dual citizen of the UK and Canada born in 1956. I worked in the UK from 1972- 1978 when I then moved to Canada. Am I entitled to anything /or is it worth me paying voluntary contributions.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Ailsa, you would need 10 years of NI contributions to qualify for a UK pension. It looks like you would have 6 already. The good news is that you can make voluntary contributions up to when you reach pension age in 2022, and can also make 6 back payments. So yes, you can become eligible for a UK pension by making a few voluntary contributions.
      From a pure financial return on investment point of view, it is absolutely worth it to make those contributions. It is a great financial deal

  117. Ezzard Everton Francis says:

    I will be 65 on 3 July 2016, when can I apply for my state pension I have worked over 39 years before taking early retirement in October 2006 and am currently living in Jamaica.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Ezzard, you should apply for your pension 4 months before you reach pension age, so around Feb 1 2016

  118. William Thompson says:

    Hi,
    I was born in1958 and worked for about 20 years in UK before emigrating to the Philippines. I’m thinking of paying voluntary co trbutilons. I’m reading now that I can pay up to 6 years in arrears. However I remember reading some time ago.that there where years more 6 yrs ago that were eligible forntary contributions due to gov’t faililing to send advisorys. Is that still the case?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello William, you are correct that there were 6 additional years that could be paid because of the Government not sending advisories, however the time limit on those has expired. They needed to be paid by 2009.

      • John Lowndes says:

        Hi,

        I was born in 1948 and emigrated to Australia in 1970. I have maintained dual citizenship. I currently live in Thailand since 2000 and am disabled through illness. Do I qualify for any pension?

        • David Morris says:

          Hello John, citizenship does not matter for British pension purposes. What matters is the number of years you worked there. Given your age, you only need 1 year of work record to qualify for a partial pension. You also have the opportunity to buy back up to 6 years to increase any pension you might be eligible for. You don’t say how many years you worked in the UK, but if you worked at least 1 year you would be eligible for something at least.

  119. Baldev Singh says:

    I Am Baldev born may 1956 .worked in England. From 1979 -1996 around 16 year. Contributed to nhs all these year’s . Did not option oue’t to private. Scheme. Please advise if entitle to pension., at what age. And estimate. Amounts. Also.can top upper give additional contribution and if yes is it advantages in my case to do so.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Baldev, you will reach pension age in May 2022. Yes, you are entitled to a UK pension, and yes, you can make voluntary contributions to increase the pension. From a purely financial perspective, it is very worthwhile to make those voluntary contributions. The extra pension that you get for each year you make an extra contribution is a very good deal

      • Baldev Singh says:

        Please advise,!what will be current pension entitlement without contribution. How many years contribution can I make. Any dead line
        s involved. Tq

        • David Morris says:

          Hello Baldev, I suggest that you join us. We will send you a package of information on what to do next, and how to get started. Your pension will be based on the number of years you have contributed. If you have 16 years, then it will be 16/35ths of the full pension

  120. Paul kennedy says:

    I was born 26/03/1950 so I think I am class 2. I serviced I uk army forces for 7 years then left uk .I check with MOD and they said I am not entitledto Army pension ,But That they can put the seven years contributions towards the state pension.I will be 65 in late March .when I was over there 6months ago the told not to contact them till three months before 65 birthday, Can I make another 7 years contributions and if how .Thanks Paul

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Paul, yes, your military service counts toward the State pension. You can also make 6 catchup payments, which would give you a total of 13 years towards the pension.
      If you join us, we can help with what to do next. We will send you a package of information on how to make those payments, plus get a pension forecast, and other helpful information. We will also be fighting on your behalf to get that pension indexed to inflation

  121. mary barry says:

    I was born January 1956.I live in Ireland but trained as a nurse in Liverpool between jan 75_april 78.worked in a Manchester nursing home for a few weeks prior to that.Would I qualify for partial pension.many thanks.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Mary, because you live in Ireland, you come under EU rules for pension. I can’t help you with that, as I am not familiar with those rules. You need to contact the Pension dept in ireland

  122. Sarjit Kaur says:

    Hi, wonder if you could help me? I am a Malaysian, residing in Malaysia. My date of birth is 31st October 1955.
    I did my nursing training in Grantham & Kesteven General Hospital, Grantham, Lincolnshire, from January 1974-January 1977.
    Worked in the same place for six months.
    Did my Midwifery training at Kings College, London, in 1977 for a year.
    After qualifying as a midwife, l worked there for a year.
    Straight after that went on to do my psychiatric training for 18 months at Bedford General Hospital & Fairfield Hospital in Hchin.
    On completing the above, l went back to working as a midwifery sister for 18 months at Welbeck Clinic, Welbeck Sreet London.
    I left England in June 1982. Please let me know if l Am entitled to A British pension?
    Thanking you in anticipation.

    Yours Sincerely,
    Sarjit Kaur

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Sarjit, you will need 10 years of contributions to the NI system to qualify for a partial pension when you reach pension age in 2021. You likely already have several qualifying years, based on your work history there. So, the short answer is that you are not eligible right now, but the good news is that you are able to make voluntary contributions from abroad to get you to the 10 years that you need. You can also make some catch up voluntary payments.

      • Sarjit Kaur says:

        Thanks David. Please advise on how l can make the voluntary contributions & the voluntary payments? Is it monthly payments or a one time payment?
        Thanks again,
        Sarjit.

        • David Morris says:

          Hello Sarjit, my best advice is for you to join us. We are a non profit group of members dedicated to lobbying the UK Government to have our state pensions indexed. We will send you a package of information on how to go about making voluntary payments, and how to apply for a pension forecast. If you are making a catch up payment, it is an annual payment.

  123. I am an Australian citizen born in 1952. I travelled to the UK on a British Passport in 1973 and worked in the UK from 1973 until approx Oct 1980 or 1981. Am I able to pay additional premiums so that I can claim a part pension when I reach pension age?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Helen. Absolutely. In fact, you already reached pension age in 2014. You only needed 1 year of work, so you more than qualify. You also are still able to make 6 catch-up voluntary payments, which in total should get you close to 50% of a full pension.
      Don’t delay in claiming it, as you will lose the ability to make a catch-up payment for each year that goes by.

  124. Peter Mitchell says:

    I was born in the UK in 1957 (age 57 now) and worked for the Post office from 1973 – 1987 before emigrating to Canada. I married a Canadian in 1983 in Canada but returned and lived and worked in England from 1983 – 1987. My wife was born in Canada in 1953 (61 now), came to the UK and worked one year for the Post Office in Oxford in 1974-1975. Is my wife eligible for a UK old age pension now and how do we go about claiming it?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Peter, how long did your wife live in the UK, and what is her exact date of birth ?
      I need to know this to give you an accurate answer

      • Peter Mitchell says:

        Thanks. DOB Feb 27 1953. First stay 18 months end of ’74 to June ’76 and then May 1983 – June 1987.

        • David Morris says:

          Hello Peter, you reach pension age under the new single tier system, however, it looks like your spouse reaches pension age under the current system. That means she is entitled to a spousal pension, equal to 60% of your pension entitlement. She also could qualify under her own contribution record, but that would not likely give her more than the 60% of yours.
          You both have to have reached pension age for your spouse to be able to claim a pension based on your contribution record.

  125. Doreen Oliver says:

    Hi I was born in Sept 1951 and lived in England until i migrated to Australia in 1981, at the age of 30. How can I find out if I am entitled to an English Pension? I am not sure how many National insurance stamps I paid as I worked part time for several years and had several years not working and bringing uo children. My husband would of paid all his contributions and be eligable for a pension however we divorced after 25yrs of marriage, would i be eligable under his contributions? He is 69yrs old and i am 63.

    Kind Regards

    Doreen

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Doreen, you reached State pension age in 2013. You only needed 1 year of work experience to qualify for a partial pension, so you are certainly eligible for a pension in your own right. You are also entitled to use your ex husbands contribution record up to the time of your divorce if that would give you a bigger pension, but you can not have remarried or been in a civil partnership up to the point you reached pension age. You also can get pension credit for years you were raising children, so it is difficult to tell whether you would get more on your own, compared to getting 60% of your ex husbands.
      If you join us, we can tell you how to get started on finding out what you are entitled to.

  126. Hi there. I was born in Canada in 1952. Married a Brit and lived in England from 1982 till 1995. I worked at various times during that period and have a NI number. We divorced in 2003. I returned to Canada in 1995 and have not remarried. How do I go about starting the OAP process? Somehere I read that if your husband’s contributions were greater than your own you can go with his ? I also read that I can access his pension without it affecting him… which I find hard to believe.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Karen, you are entitled to a British Pension in your own right, based on the years you worked there. You can also choose to claim a pension based on your ex husbands contributions, but only up to the time of your divorce, and only if you have not remarried or formed a new civil relationship. A spousal pension is about 60% of your ex husbands full pension, so it is hard to say which would be bigger – your own or the spousal.
      If you do use your exes contribution record, it does not affect his pension in any way.
      The best bet is to join us. We will give you a package of information on how to get started. The first step would be to find out what you are entitled to on your own, and then based on a spousal record.

  127. Jeffrey Highton says:

    I am 74 years of age and have worked in the UK from age 15 to age 71. I have recently married an old friend who lives in Australia and naturally I have moved there. I will still receive my age pension from the UK but they have told me that I will no longer receive any pension credits of 21.75 pound a week. My pension is 135.99 pound. My wife, as my wife receives $485 Australian dollars a month from the British pensions. No longer receiving pension credits is a concern for me. Please can you advise?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Jeffrey, unfortunately, pension credits are only paid if you live in the UK. Sorry, but that is the rules they have.

  128. Pippa Wahl says:

    Hi David Morris,

    Would you be able to advise me whether my father in law would qualify for a British pension?

    His father was born in the UK and a British soldier in World War II who was killed in North Africa; His mother was an Italian/Jewish prisoner of war. My father in law was born at Mothers hospital in Durban which is now known as the Salvation Army.

    Please advise whether you require more information.

    Many thanks,

    Pippa

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Pippa, the UK pension is based on contributions made through employment in the UK, so if he did not work or live there, he would not be eligible for any pension

  129. Jane Simmons says:

    My husband was a British citizen until his death in 2008. He was born in 1936 and never collected any of his age pension. I have never worked in Britain and now live in U.S.A. Will I be eligible to collect any or part of his pension when I become of eligible age later this year?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Jane, provided you have not remarried or formed a new civil partnership up to the point you reach pension age, then you would be entitled to a british pension based on your former husbands contribution record. You didn’t say, but he had to have worked in the UK to build eligibility for a pension. Being a citizen isn’t enough – he had to have worked there.
      If he did, and was eligible for a pension – even if he hadn’t claimed it – then you would be eligible for a pension based on his pension eligibility.
      We can help you get started on claiming that

  130. John Potter says:

    I receive a pension of about 40% and my wife about 20% of the British pension here in South Africa and am thinking of returning to the UK next year ,I would like to know will mine or my wife’s pension change when we return ,I will be 75y and my wife 74y old..

    • David Morris says:

      Hello John, yes, if you move back to the UK both your pensions would be adjusted to bring them up to the level they would be if your pensions had never been frozen

  131. I was born in Belfast, NI and worked there for quite a few years before moving to Canada 1974. I moved back again but i have no idea if i am entitled to a pension. Look forward to your reply.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Kathleen, if you worked in Belfast you would have made National Insurance contributions, which would entitle you to a British pension, regardless of where you live

  132. Hi: I was born in the UK in 1961 and worked there from 1983 until 1988 when I moved to Canada, where I’ve lived ever since.

    I read your guidelines at the top of this page, but would be grateful if you could clarify a couple of points for me:

    1-Can you tell me if I would need to make class 2 (£143) or class 3 (£700) payments in order to qualify for a minimum UK pension? I assume that I would need to make at least 5 such payments to bring me up to the 10 year minimum.

    2-Also, is there any particular schedule for making the payments (for instance, could they be made at any time between now and when the pension kicks in) ?

    3-For someone born in 1961, what is the minimum qualifying age for a UK pension?

    Many thanks!

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Nick, yes, you will need to get to 10 years to qualify for a minimum pension. You will therefore have to make voluntary contributions. Both Class 2 and Class 3 contributions are equivalent in terms of qualifying you. The rules about being eligible to make Class 2 are quite strict, and we can help explain that.
      You are allowed 6 years to pay the contribution for a given year. So you could pay the 2015 contribution amount up to 2011. After that, you lose the right to contribute for that year.
      Your pension age will be 67

  133. William Thompson says:

    I will be 65 July 2015 and have paid into voluntary contributions for awhile and will qualify for a full pension when I retire. My question is about my canadian wife, who has never worked in the uk. She was born in 1954. Is she entitled to anything? Thank you in advance for your reply.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello William, unfortunately no. She reaches pension age after 2016, when the new rules come into force. Spousal pensions will no longer be available

  134. Mary Finn says:

    Hello,

    I worked in The Revenue in Salisbury from July 1967 til Dec 1969. I also worked in a Salisbury hospital for 10 weeks in 1967. I am living in Ireland, getting a pension as a qualified dependent on my husbands contributory Irish pension. I would be grateful if you can let me know if am entitled to any British pension, if so will it be back dated to my 60th birthday which was in Dec 2008.

    Thank you for any help in this matter.

    Kind regards,

    Mary.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Mary, because you live in Ireland, you come under the EU rules for pensions. It is likely that your time spent in the UK will count towards an Irish pension, but I am not familiar with all the rules in the EU. Sorry. You would need to contact a pension office in Ireland

  135. Ron Duffell says:

    Hi there. I left England in 1977 so planning for my retirement. I have just recently been advised by the Dept of works and pensions that I have 9 qualifying years of NI contributions, however, Its not very clear on “how” I go about determining my eligibility to increase my contributions and go about topping up to meet at least the 10 years minimum, Any help or advice would be greatly appreciated.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Ron, You are certainly eligible to make voluntary contributions. The only question is whether you can make them at the Class 2 rate, or the Class 3 rate. Both are equivalent in terms of creating qualifying years but the Class 2 rate is substantially cheaper.
      If you join us, we can help with understanding how to qualify for the Class 2. We also provide a full package of information on how to make voluntary contributions

  136. Hi.

    Apologies if this scenario has been addressed before.

    My wife and I are both US citizens and eligible for US Social Security (we have enough US work credits to fully qualify).

    We also lived in the UK for a period of time and according to my wife’s National Insurance statement, she has 5 qualifying years up to 5 April 2014 (last paid in year was 2007-2008). [I was a stay at home dad for about 1/2 that time, so I have roughly 3 years, but am not sure]

    She in now 58yo and has been self-employed in the US for the past 8 years (having paid into US Social Security during that time).

    Can we now “top up”, i.e. another 5 years of voluntary contributions to allow her to collect the minimum UK state pension?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Mark, the answer is yes, she can make both future voluntary payments, and some catch up payments that will get her to the minimum required (and likely more). You likely could make enough payments to qualify for a minimum pension as well

  137. Margaret Edwardes says:

    HI Davd
    I was born on the 21st October 1952 and have been advised that I am eligible for a state pension in May.I am married to an Australian and my husband has never lived or worked or lived in the UK.Is he eligible for a category B pension?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Margaret, it will depend on your husbands age. If you can tell me his date of Birth, I can let you know if he is eligible

  138. Katrina Mary Lovell says:

    Hello – was wondering if you could help me with your expertise? I am British but live in Canada. I was born in 1954 and will be 65 in 2019. I am informed that I have 21 qualifying years up to April 2013 referring to state pension. I have a chart showing me amounts of class 3 voluntary contributions still payable on my account and which I need to pay to count towards basic pension, for tax years 2006 – 2014. My question – would it benefit me to pay the amounts for each year owing? If I did pay for those tax years outstanding, how many qualifying years would this give me? Would this help me in obtaining a better UK pension. I appreciate any advice you can give.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Katrina, I can tell you from a pure financial perspective that it is absolutely worthwhile making those voluntary contributions. If you have 21, and you can make another 8 up to 2014, that would give you 29. You likely can make another 4 or 5 up to 2018 to get you to 33 or 34. You need 35 to qualify for a full pension. I can’t tell you what a full pension will be in 2019, as it increases every year, and there are big changes coming in 2016 that could increase it further. No one knows what the exact amounts are going to be in 2016, but it will be more than today.
      To give you an idea, a full pension in 2014 is about £113 a week, or £5,876 a year. In 2019 it might be in the £140 a week range, depending on what happens in 2016.
      The way the system works, you get an amount for every year credit you have. It is a simple formula based on dividing the maximum weekly pension by the number of years you need for the full pension, to give you the amount per year of credit.
      For example, in 2014, you get £3.76 a week for every year of contributions you have. That is based on £113/30 = £3.76.
      In 2019 you will need 35 years, so the amount you get for every week of credit is the full pension amount in 2019 divided by 35. If you have 33 years, you will get that weekly amount multiplied by 33
      Hope this helps

      • Katrina Lovell says:

        Hello David,

        Thank you so much for your quick response to my questions. I am now aware that I need 35 years for a full pension. I am certainly going to make up as many contributions as I can. I just need to know where to start, and how to ‘top up’ those payments owed to the UK pension scheme, plus more that I can possibly make to almost get to 35 years. I would like to join you – this way you can make me understand a little more in how to go about topping up those contributions. Please let me know how I join? Once again, thank you for all your help.

        Katrina.

  139. I have a united states born friend, born 1944 who worked on and off for about 5 years in UK in the late 70s and early 80s. She is 70 now and she receives about 70.00 dollars a month of UK pension. She is divorced from her UK husband who now lives in the United States. He was born 1950 and only worked about 5 years in the UK. Is it worth it for her to apply for a spousal pension…or would it probably be just the same as what she is getting now.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Carol, if your friend and her husband both worked in the UK for the same amount of time, they would be getting the same pension. A spousal pension would only be 60% of the husbands pension, so she is better off with her own

  140. Hi David,
    I am currently receiving a limited UK pension. Is my wife (a Canadian who has never worked in the UK) entitled to any pension now or after my death?

    Thank you for what you do.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Jim, she may well be. What is her date of birth ?

      • Hello David,

        My wife’s date of birth is 3rd April 1944.

        Jim

        • David Morris says:

          Hello Jim, yes, your wife is entitled to a spousal pension equal to 60% of yours, both now and after your death. The pension she gets will also be backdated to her retirement age.

          • Hi David,

            Good news. Is IPC BR1 GOV the correct form to use to claim her pension?

            We are both very thankful for your advice and happy to join CABP

            Jim

          • David Morris says:

            Hi Jim, glad to help. Yes, that is the form to use.

  141. Hi,

    I worked in the u.k. full-time from 1966 until 1974. I will be 65 in February of this year. I was wondering if I qualify for a part u.k. state pension, and if I do does the Canadian government tax it?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Isabel, yes you would be entitled to a partial UK state pension. You only needed 1 year of work to qualify for a partial pension and you have more than that. You reached pension age in 2011, so the good news is that you can either get an increased weekly payment, or a lump sum.

  142. Happy New Year to all.

    I moved to the UK when i was 18, tht was 13 years ago and worked full time during those 13 years. i recently moved back to my home country and am looking into the pension but i do not know if i will be entile to any?

    From the above i take it i am entiled but it also states that it changes every year so am i wrong to assume that one year this entiltment can be taken away?

    Will i be entiled to a full one as i worked full time? or only if i worked the 35 years?

    Many thanks in advance for your help.

    Marai

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Maria, yes, you are entitled to a partial UK pension, based on the years you worked there. How that pension will be paid depends on where you are living now, and whether your current country has a pension harmonization agreement with the UK. There are no plans that I am aware of that would cause you to lose that entitlement.

  143. i would like to know i was 62 in dec 2014 what month do i get my state pension

  144. Ed Goulding says:

    Hi,

    I am looking into the future and wonder if I would qualify for a minimum UK state pension when I turn 65 in 2031.
    I left the UK in Aug 2005 and had worked full time since Aug 1994 except for 1 year in Australia and 3 years spent as an undergraduate. This I believe leaves me 7 full years of contributions (not taking into account the NI contributions I made in part time work between the ages of 16 and 18) and 3 years of part time/summer work while I was studying.

    My question is thus: how are pension contribution years calculated? Must one have made contributions for each month of a year in order it for it to count as a year? Or is there a minimum figure/sum one must have reached in each year?

    Many Thanks,

    Ed

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Ed, good for you to be planning ahead.
      There is a minimum figure that must be reached to have a year classified as a qualifying year.
      It changes every year, but to give you a sense, if you earned over £5,700 in a year this year, then you would have made sufficient NI contributions to have a qualifying year (the figure would be less than that back in the 1990′s).
      If you earned less than the lower limit, you may still get NI Credits if you are unemployed on Job Seekers allowance.
      So, you do not need to have worked every month, you just need to have reached the minimum annual amount.
      Your best bet is to get a pension statement from the DWP. It will tell you what your contribution record was.

  145. Hi and seasons greetings!!

    I was born in the uk in 1967 and worked full time between 1986 and 2005 before emigrating to Australia in 2006.

    Am I eligble for a full UK state pension at retirement age, or will I need to make additional contributions?

    If I need to make extra contributions, what type would they be and are you able to help or do you only help Canadian based expats?

    Many thanks
    Neil.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Neil, and seasons greetings to you.
      You will need 35 years for a full pension, and 10 minimum for a partial. You already have more than the 10, so you already meet the minimum for a partial pension. You can make also additional contributions to get you to at least close to the 35 number. Those contributions will be either at the Class 2 or Class 3 level. Class 2 is cheaper, but the rules for being eligible are more stringent.
      We have members from all over the world, so there is no issue with helping only Canadian expats. You can join us online, and we will send you an emailed Information package, including how to qualify for Class 2.

      • Excellent! Thanks David for your swift response.

        I will sign up very soon!

        All the best for 2015!

        Regards
        Neil

      • Hi David

        How long after payment (I have paid online via PayPal) do you send out the email pack?

        Thanks
        Neil

        • David Morris says:

          hello Neil, normally it is within 24 hours, but because of the holiday season, our office (staffed by volunteers) is closed this week. You should expect it by Monday at the latest.

      • michael king says:

        I lived and worked in the UK from 1973 until 1980. What will it take for me to get the minimum pension activated. I do not plan to retire from working here in Canada until 2017. I would also like to make additional payments to get me close to the full pension. How would I go about doing this.

        I really appreciate any information you can provide

        Sincerely

        Michael King

        • David Morris says:

          Hello Michael, you will need 10 years to get a minimum pension, and you need 35 to get a full pension. My best suggestion is for you to join us. We will give you a complete package of information on making voluntary payments, including the eligibility rules for making Class 2. You can also make 6 catch up payments in addition to payments going forward. This is worth doing

  146. Mike Durkin says:

    Hi, I will be eligible for a part UK Pension in May 2015. I have 17 years entitlement to that. I Emigrated to Australia in 1974 and returned to UK in 1997 to reside and work here permanently.I have Australian citizenship and would be eligible for some sort of pension from there I think. Can you tell me who actually claims this pension – do I make the claim or does the UK Pension service claim on my behalf. If so, what sort of process is involved and what information is required. I am very confused as to who is meant to be dealing with Australia – me or the UK Pension service.
    Thank you

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Mike (Durkin)
      I’m afraid I can’t help you very much with this, as we are set up to handle UK pension claims by expats. However,there is no reciprocal pension agreement between Australia and the UK, so any pension you are owed from Australia you would have to claim yourself. The UK pension office will not do this.

  147. Rick Stapenhurst says:

    Hi. I was born in 1948; I worked in various Christmas/summer jobs from 1963 to 1970 and then full-time from 1970-1971, when I emigrated to Canada. Am I entitled to any pension and, more especially, am I allowed to top up my contributions?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Rick, you only need 1 year of contributions to qualify, and you certainly will have that. So, you do qualify for a partial pension of some kind. You still have the opportunity to make some top up contributions, but you need to act quickly, as you lose a year as each year goes by. If you join us, we can get help you get started on this.

  148. Mark Santer says:

    I worked in England for 6 years before moving to Holland. Am I eligable for a reduced
    pension ??

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Mark, you live in a EU country, which means pensions are harmonized. That means that any work experience in the UK will count towards a EU pension.

  149. add on to prior comment
    I was born after Apr 6 1951
    also how many years do I need to top up?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Mike, you will need 10 years. You are likely close to that, but you need to get a pension statement from the DWP that will tell you exactly what credits you have.
      We can help you with how to do that

  150. Hi David
    so pleased to have come across this site! I am Canadian born dual citizen, I resided in UK for 9 Years and 48 weeks.

    I was employed for about 7 years, was unemployed my first 4 months in UK, and was on Job Seekers Allowance for at total close to 2 years. Not sure if JSA counts towards pension. I also have not applied for my pension but passed 60 three years ago. Can I still top up? Can I claim retroactive? Or would I be better to explore transferring UK credit to my CPP, if possible? Any assistance much appreciated.

    If there is a petition in Canada to get COL increases to ex=pat pensions I will happily add my name.
    thx
    Mike

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Mike, there is a provision for NI credits if you are on Job Seekers Allowance. Given your work record and JSA, you likely are very close to qualifying for a minimum state pension. You also still have time to top up.
      You can not get CPP Credit for any UK contributions, so your only option is to claim the UK pension directly.
      If you join us, we will help you with how to find out your pension status and how to make voluntary contributions etc. You will also be helping us fight to get pensions indexed.

  151. Steve Hinds says:

    Hi Dave,
    I was born July 11/51 in Luton, England. I worked for the Post Office between Sept 67 and May 72 and emigrated to Canada that month. I see that I only qualify for the 10 year rule. Since I am 65 in 18 months, do I have time to top up the funds and is it worth it for me?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Steve, yes, you will need 10 years. You do have the opportunity to buy back some years which should get you to 10. Financially, it is definitely a good investment to make these payments. At Class 3 levels, you get your money back with the extra pension in 3 years. That’s a really good deal. Don’t delay, though as you will lose the ability to buy back years as each year passes.

  152. Tsele Moloi says:

    Hi,

    My mother lived and worked in the UK for 8 years as a nurse before taking early retirement and moving to South Africa. She was born on 24/09/1953. I assume she falls within the third tier category wherein she has to make top up contributions of an addtional two years. Is this correct? Would she then have to make a contribution of 1400 pounds between now and Sept 2016 to be eligible?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Tsele, yes you are correct. It looks like your mother would need another 2 years to qualify for a minimum pension. Her pension age is actually in March 2018, so she has some time. She can make the minimum two years during this period, but she can also make more than that if she wants a bigger pension.
      First step is to find out how many years credit she actually has.

    • Eddie Tanner says:

      Hi David,
      I have worked in ireland from 1998- 2011. I currently stay in South africa, will i be able to qualify for state pension. I was born 22 June 1952. I am south african and Irish citizen. How can I check what contributions i have?

      • David Morris says:

        Hello Eddie, if you worked in the republic of Ireland, I can’t help you. The pension system there is completely different from the UK pension scheme, and I don’t know anything about it. Sorry.

  153. Kevin Coffey says:

    Hello,
    I am a British citizen, born 1964, worked in the UK from 1982 to 1994, went to University as a mature student, after graduation I went to work in the US. I am thinking of returning to the UK, how does my pension stand ?…Thanks

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Kevin, You are already eligible for a partial UK pension based on your years worked. You can also increase that pension by making voluntary contributions from wherever you live. You do not need to return to the UK to get your pension, or to make contributions.

  154. Hi, just wondering how up to date the above information is…particularly with regard to the third category. Thank you.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Lisa, it is as up to date as we know at this time. The new pension coming in after 2016 has not been fully defined by the Government, but this is what we know at the moment

  155. Tony Bertram says:

    I am a dual Canadian/British citizen, I recently renewed my British passport. I worked in UK from 1973 to 1975 when I emigrated to Canada at age 18. Would I be eligible for pension? I don’t have any records from that time, I worked in several jobs from age 16 to 18.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Tony, it will depend on your age. I need your date of birth to tell you whether you are entitled or not. If you read this information, it should help you determine yourself if you are eligible.
      http://www.britishpensions.com/the-uk-state-pension-who-is-eligible/

      • Tony Bertram says:

        Hello David, I was born in November 1956.

        • David Morris says:

          Hi Tony, you will reach pension age in 2022. You will need 10 years of National Insurance contributions to qualify for a partial pension. The good news is that you can become eligible simply by making voluntary contributions until 2022. You can also make some back payments to add additional years for additional credit. So yes, you can become eligible. Don’t delay, though, because every year that goes by you lose the option of making a voluntary payment

  156. Hi. I been working in UK from 2002 until 2012. I’m 42 now living and working in EU. Could answer me, please, i will get UK pension, or not? Thanks.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Henrikas, yes, you will get credit for the time you worked in the UK. EU pensions are harmonized so that work experience in any country counts towards pension entitlement.

  157. Anne Exell says:

    Why has my sons army pension and my daughter-in-laws police pensions stopped because they have emigrated to Canada

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Anne, I cant help you with that. They need to contact the police pension scheme.

    • Hello David,
      I was born December 1952 in England and worked there for six years from age 16 to 22 before emigrating to Canada. Would I qualify for a U.K. state pension ? Thank you.
      Chris

      • David Morris says:

        Hello Chris, you will need 10 years of work credit to qualify. The good news is that you are still able to make voluntary contributions and catch up payments. That will certainly get you to the minimum level you need.

  158. James Farr says:

    I was born in the UK and my first job was in 1967. For all but a handful of weeks, I worked or was receiving NI credits right through to late 1999 when I emigrated to the USA.
    I didn’t have I did work in the UK on a return visit for a few months, but since 2007 have remained in the USA.
    Although I have lived in the USA for some years I have only worked for about 8 or 9 of those years.

    I will be 65 years old shortly before the New Year 2015.

    From what I have calculated based on the years I worked in the UK (1967 to 1999) my NI contributions will qualify me for the full UK pension amount.
    But I understand that social security contributions in one country might be used to calculate retirement pension in the other country. Would I do better to apply for the UK state pension even though I am resident in the USA?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello James, you are correct in saying that contributions in the UK can count as credits in the US, for calculation of various benefits.
      You would need to calculate which method gives you the best return. I can’t help you with it, as I don’t know what the various benefit entitlements are in the US. The UK benefits are easy to calculate, but the US benefits are not.

  159. I am going back to the UK next year with my Australian husband. I worked in the UK for 12 years before moving to Oz, and I know I can use my Australian work record pre-2000 to get the full pension.

    Someone has told me that if my husband gets a part-time job in the UK for a year, he’d be eligible for the UK pension and could use his Australian work record pre-2000 to increase his payments. He’s 62.

    I can see from your comments that one qualifying year is all that’s needed, but would part-time be enough?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Thea, if your husband is 62 now, he will need 10 years to qualify under the new pension system in 2016.
      Other than that, I cant help you very much with the rules that apply if you live in England. I am only familiar with the rules that apply if you live outside the UK

  160. My wife worked in England for about 5 years before coming to Canada. She reached age 65 late in 2010 so I believe she would be in Catagory 2. I understand she could do a lump sum buyback to top up her contributions and be eligible for a British Pension. Is this correct? Would the buyback be worth it for the amount of pension she would receive?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Brian, your wife actually reached pension age when she was 60, which would have been in 2005. As such she came under the old rules where she needed 10 years for a minimum pension. Unfortunately, it is now too late for her to buy back any years to reach the minimum.

  161. Hi, I worked for about 7 years in the uk before moving to Australia in 1981, one of my friends suggested I am may be eligible for the english pension. I am now 58, I am not sure when the cut off period is,
    Thanks.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Lesley, you come under the new legislation, where you will need 10 years of work contributions to qualify. The good news is that you are still able to make voluntary National Insurance contributions from wherever you live. This will certainly get you to the minimum you need. So yes, you can easily become eligible for a partial UK pension

  162. BARB MARSH says:

    Thank you for your help..

  163. Peter Jay says:

    Hello David, I would appreciate your counsel.
    I am a British citizen, born in 1954 in the UK, and will be 65 years old in 2019. I paid NI contributions for about a year after finishing school and then left England and have been involved in volunteer work in SE Asia ever since; however not with any well known charities.
    Is there a possibility that with the help of some voluntary contributions, I could secure some kind of pension for my old age? And also, do you think that a brief return to work in the UK would help towards that goal?
    Thank you.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Peter, you do not need to return to the UK. You can make voluntary contributions from anywhere in the world. You will need 10 years of contributions to qualify for a partial pension. You should be able to make 6 back payments, plus 4 or 5 future payments, plus whatever you made in the UK. That should do it, but you need to move on this as soon as possible, so you have enough time

  164. BARB MARSH says:

    I am British worked in the UK from 16 yrs. old to late 20′s.. I am 60yrs old and just wondering if I am entitled to any pension Thanks in advance.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Barb, yes, you would be entitled to a partial state pension. Don’t delay in moving ahead with this, as you are still able to make some back payments as well. if you join us, we will tell you everything you need to know to get started.

  165. HI David,
    Is UK pension taxable income in Canada?
    A friend of mine who gets UK pension in Canada says it is not due to a tax treaty between UK and Canada

    • Peter Wells says:

      Hi Firoz,

      Under the double taxation treaty between the UK & Canada, the UK state pension is taxable in Canada but not in the UK.

  166. Martine Lamour Koessler says:

    Hi,
    i have worked in England from late 1982 (or beginning 1983) to june 1986 and the french pension system
    i depend on said that the time i worked in England would count for my pension in France
    (i was recorded in NHS as Miss M.C.P. LAMOUR, can you give me informations on this.
    and also let me know if when i retire i will be entitled to a pension from England
    for the time i worked in the UK

    my employers were :
    Bristish Home Store in Watford and in Southend-on-sea
    Intasun Holidays in London
    American Express in Brighton

    Many thanks for your prompt answer,

    Yours faitjfully

    M. Koessler (my married name is Koessler)

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Martine, your pension falls under the rules of the EU. Any credits from any EU country are combined together to produce a single pension. I can’t be more specific, because I am not familiar with all the EU rules, but your work experience in the UK will be recognized

  167. marg dixon says:

    i have been livinc in newzeland since 1968 and want to come back to live to be with my family would i be able to get the pension i was bourn in huddersfield and if so what would i be entitled to hoping to here from you i intend to come next year margaret dixon ne howbridge i am 71 year old

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Marg, it will depend on the number of years you worked in the UK. You need to have worked at least 10

    • marg dixon says:

      i came to new zealand in 1968 i want to come back to be with my family and plan to cone back next june and want to be sure i would got the pension my cosinn rang pension place over thir and they thurght i would be able to get it i hope you can help me as i need to no befor i make arengments thanks marg dixon

      • David Morris says:

        Hello Marg, as you are returning to the UK, you need to contact the pension department there. There may be other benefits you could qualify for, and I am not knowledgeable on those. Our website is for helping British pensioners who live abroad.

  168. Scott Bowie says:

    My parent are both Scottish Citizens. I was born in Canada in 1970 but lived in Scotland for 8 years between (1980 to 1988) before moving back to Canada where I now reside. I am a dual citizen and worked in Scotland for 1 year making NI contributions. What would my eligibility be for a pension in the future. Would it be beneficial to make voluntary payments as I am considering whether I might retire back to Scotland in the future.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Scott, yes, you are potentially eligible for a UK pension. YOu will need 10 years of contributions, but you can make voluntary contributions from Canada.
      It is a good financial deal to do that, and your pension will be paid in Canada or Scotland

      • Scott Bowie says:

        How do I go about completing the necessary paperwork and make contributions?

        • David Morris says:

          Hello Scott, the easiest next step is for you to join us. As a member, we will send you a package of information on how to get started – including how to make voluntary contributions. We are a volunteer based, not for profit organization dedicated to supporting British pensioners living abroad.

  169. bhag singh says:

    hi I am going to 65 in june 2015 can I apply uk pension now .I am qualify for pension.thankyou.

  170. Hello,

    My partner (b Sept ’45), worked in UK for a few years while qualifying as an accountant and beyond, following which he had the opportunity to work in Africa for and Rep of Ireland for a while. In about 1974/78 he moved to a British Overseas Territory where he worked and became fully vested in their system.

    We now reside in France (as of this month). He can’t find his NIN (moved too many times to retain the paperwork), and an endeavour to try and obtain it through the DWP web site reuted in a Private Eye “stupid letter of the week response”. Clearly, without knowing for how many years he worked in UK/RoI it is difficult to know whether he has made sufficient contributions to qualify for a pension. We plan to travel to UK at the end of this month and part of our mission is to visit DWP in Newcastle to see what we can learn. Any advice you may be able to give would be most sincerely appreciated.

    Kind regards

    Alex

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Alex, normally the only thing you need to get your NI number is either the last address you lived at in the UK, or your last employer in the UK.
      You need to write to them telling them that information, and asking for the NI number, and a pension forecast statement

  171. Maire Tierney says:

    Hello I worked in the NHS system as a graduate nurse then SRN in 1973/1974 when I went to Canada. Now have retired toIreland and need to find out any and all contributions made that can I can use for my pension here. How do I go about this please.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Maire, because you now live in Ireland, you are governed by EU pension rules. You need to contact your local pension office in Ireland. They will find out all contributions you made in other EU countries

  172. I lived in UK from 1998 till now,my date of birth is 19/01/1973 i worked in UK 7months and I stoped work because my illness and disability. I contributed to UK NI. Will I get any state pension when I am retired. How can I pay additional contributionb to top up my pension.
    Many thanks

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Khadija, you will only get a state pension if you have made NI contributions. As you live in the UK, you need to contact a local branch of the Dept of Works and pensions to find out how you can make voluntary contributions

  173. My husband and I moved to Canada in 1989 and are dual citizens of Britain and Canada. I worked for 3 years in England before moving here. My husband worked in England for 10 years full-time before we moved here. Are either of us eligible for any type of pension? I was born in 1963 and my husband was born in 1960 so we are not due to retire for some time but are interested to know how we go about claiming any pension owed to us.

    Thank you for your help.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Allison, the short answer is, yes, you can become eligible for a UK state pension. Your husband has already reached the minimum number of 10 years. You have only 3, but you are able to make on going voluntary contributions to boost both you and your husbands pensions. This is financially worth doing. If you join us, we will send you an information package on how to get started, and how to make voluntary contributions.

  174. John Carroll says:

    #29934

    Hi Dave,

    I mailed my BR19 form to the U.K on September.19.2014, requesting a pension statement, and tracing my NIN etc. Just wondering, in your experience, does it usually take this long for a reply? I’m concerned because I’ve heard somewhere that you can’t ‘top up’ your shortfall in the same year as you collect (65 in September 2015). Any and all advice is appreciated.

    John

    • David Morris says:

      Hello John, they say it should only be a couple of weeks, although my experience is it is usually about 6 weeks. If you don’t hear soon, it may be worthwhile to call them.

      • John Carroll says:

        Membership #29934.

        Hi Dave, I took your advice and called Newcastle. Thank you. They had me in their system and I have now received my pension statement, along with my lost NIN. It seems that I contributed for eight years and will receive a partial pension. Good so far. Next step is voluntary top up payments. My birth date is 19.09.1950. I am lead to believe from Newcastle that I can only top up six years. Is this true, and if it is, what will the lump sum cost me. You have indicated that this is a worthwhile investment, so am anxious to get started. Newcastle gave me a phone number to call once I received my statement, to the HM Revenue and Customs. Apparently they will explain my situation and options to top up the ‘shortfall’, either on the phone or likely by mail?

        Wanted to check with you first though, re things I shouldn’t say or should say etc. Thanks for any and all response,

        John

  175. Hi,

    I don’t know if you can help, but I am British originally and have been working in Canada for the past couple of years. I was speaking to someone who mentioned that some countries have treaties where paying into a government pension plan in one country counts in the other. I have to pay CPP and I was wondering if this is the case, or would I need to pay voluntary national insurance to ensure I get a UK state pension (at the moment I am on a work permit so it would make more sense to opt for that one)

    Thanks

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Paula, you are required to pay CPP, and you can’t get around that. However, under certain conditions, time spent working in Canada can count towards your National Insurance contributions in the UK. The rules are a little complex. You can not have lived in Canada for more than 20 years, for example. Your best bet is to contact the Dept of Works and Pensions in the UK.

  176. Hi David,

    I was born in UK in January 1959 and worked between 1977 and 1985 in UK, then moved to Germany and Australia with my husband who was in the UK Army. During this time i brought up my children and worked one year. In 1996 we emigrated permanently to Australia ( the children were 9 and 11 at this point). Am I eligible for a UK pension? Thanks for your help, debb

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Debb, yes, you will be entitled to a partial UK pension, provided you have 10 years of National Insurance contributions in the UK. You are likely pretty close to that already, but the good news is that you are still able to make voluntary contributions to enable you to at least get to the 10 years you need. You don’t reach pension age until 2025, so you have lots of time left to boost your pension by making those voluntary contributions.

  177. I was born in the UK in August 1981. I left in 2011. Aside from two years working, I was in full time education until I left the UK. According to my NI record, I have 5 qualifying years. The schedule attached to the NI record lists only the two years I was working, so am I right in thinking the other 3 years are the years of my 16th, 17th and 18th birthdays?

    My NI record invites me to make 5 years back contributions at Class 3 rate (approx £700/year). I looked carefully at form NI38, and I cannot tell if I am eligible for the Class 2 rate for either these back contributions, or for future contributions. Is my best bet to submit the NI38 form and have them make a ruling? Does that ruling apply to the back contributions as well as future, or do I need to do something else to determine if I can make Class 2 back contributions?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello John, you are correct about the 5 years NI Credit.
      The Government does not make it easy to make Class 2 payment, and usually doesn’t advise you about it. You have to apply to make Class 2 in a letter.
      If you join us, we can tell you the rules that apply, and they are generally strict about it.

  178. Hi,
    Thank you replying to many folks who have asked questions about their UK State Pension. You are doing a great service.

    I have now got 22 qualifying years and will be 65 in Dec 2014. (born Dec 1949). I have received a letter from HM Revenue and Customs suggesting that I am eligible to buy back additional 6 non-qualifying years at pounds 722.80 per year. If I buyback — will this increase my years to 28? The key words in the letter that bother me are ” six additional non-qualifying years”

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Firoz, yes, buying back those years will increase your record to 28 qualifying years. This is a standard offer made to anyone who already has 20 years at retirement age

  179. Hi David,

    I would like to clarify the eligibilty for UK State pension

    My dad born 8 April 1951, working in UK for 4 years. I understand that there is a limit for man 11 years. However,
    I assume you can somehow credit the years while working overseas.

    What is the best practice for expats? I have read on the web page copied below from which I think it should be possible to get the requested years.
    Could you please advise ?

    Thank you very much for your help.
    Kind regards.

    https://www.gov.uk/new-state-pension/living-and-working-overseas

    “You’ve worked or lived overseas

    Your UK State Pension will be based on your UK National Insurance record.

    However, you may be able to use your time abroad to make up the 10 qualifying years needed to get any new State Pension. This is most likely if you’ve lived or worked in:
    the European Economic Area (EEA)
    Switzerland
    certain countries that have a social security agreement with the UK”

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Lucie, your father will need 10 years of work credits to qualify. The good news is that he is still able right now to make voluntary contributions, and to buy back 6 years which will get him to the minimum he needs.
      I need to know where your father worked overseas, to be able to tell you if that qualifies. If he worked in Canada, that does not qualify. If in the EU, it does.

  180. Brian Stacey says:

    Hello

    I was born in Uk 1967, higher education until 1988, then from 1989 until present working in NHS. I intend to move to Indonesia in Feb 2016 – i’ll be 48, 49 in March 2016, by my reckoning i’ll have paid in 31 years NI contributions. I’m assuming i now have to pay in 35 years. i won’t be working in Indonesia, my wife will have a business though. Will i be able to claim my pension there and will i be able to top up to 35 years. i’m not sure if i need the full 35 years to claim the pension in Indonesia. If i do need to top up when would i need to do this by and what would i have to pay to get the full pension. Failing that would i be able to claim the partial pension if i decided not to top up, and would the pension qualify for annual rise in costs increase? Sorry for the long question!!

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Brian. Yes, you will need 35 years for a full pension. You certainly can make voluntary payments to get the additional years you need. You can make those voluntary payments from anywhere, and you do not need to be employed to make them. You can also have your pension paid wherever you live. Be aware, though, that if you live in Indonesia, that pension will be frozen at the level you first receive it. Indonesia is one of the “frozen” countries, which is what we are fighting hard for to change. You do not have to top up, if you don’t want to. You will simply receive a pro rated pension based on the number of years you already have. You can make the voluntary top up payments at any time. Ideally, you want to make them at the Class 2 rate, as they are substantially cheaper.
      If you join us, we will give you a package of information on how to go about making these payments. We will also be fighting on your behalf to end pension freezing.

  181. Mark LePage says:

    Hi There, I’m inquiring on behalf of my mother who was born in England in 1936. She worked in the UK for 3 yrs before immigrating to Canada. Is she eligible for a partial pension? And if she is, would you be able to lead me in the right direction on where I could find application material and info on topping up the pension?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Mark, unfortunately, your mother is in the age category that needed 10 years of work in the UK to qualify for a minimum pension. Sorry

      • michael castiello says:

        Could you please clarify my position. I was born in england in 1956, worked from settember 1973 up until august 1982. During this time i was unemployd for 3 months. Then imigrated and live in Italy since. Could you please tell me if i’m entitled to a minimum state pension. Thank you.

        • David Morris says:

          Hello Michael, you normally will need 10 years of work contributions to qualify for a minimum UK pension – however because you live in the EU all pensions are harmonized. Which means that any contributions you made, in any country in the EU, all qualify for a standardized EU pension. When you reach pension age, your entire work history, in any country, is added together to arrive at your total eligibility. If you have been working in Italy, then that record also counts towards the UK pension

  182. bhag singh buttar says:

    hi my dob is june 1950 . I work and contribute national insurance for4 and half years in uk .now I living in Canada .am I eligible to get any partial state pention. thankyou very much

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Mr Buttar, yes, you qualify for a partial UK pension when you reach pension age next year. You also can make additional voluntary contributions to get you an increase in the pension.

  183. Hugh Barbour says:

    Could you please clarify my position; I was born in UK November 1944, worked in Northern Ireland from 26th August 1961 to 7th August 1964 then migrated & have lived in Australia since. I intend to retire soon and thought I should check if I had any eligibility to a part UK Pension if I top-up.
    Under your heading “Men born before 6th April 1945 etc. …” you state >>
    ….. At this late stage, just one voluntary payment can be made to top-up your pension contributions to meet the minimum, and only if you reach pension age in 2009/10.
    In contrast to above I think that you have replied in your Q&A section that it’s too late to top up in similar circumstances; i.e. my normal UK retirement age 25th Nov. 2009.
    Thanks for any clarification you can give and thanks for your generous contributions via your website – it’s great.
    Hugh Barbour

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Hugh, you are in the age group that needs 11 years to qualify for a partial pension. You likely only have 5, based on your employment history. It is too late for you to top up enough to reach the minimum, so there is no point in you topping up any. You could top up 1 year, but that would be a waste of money for you.

  184. Colin Newman says:

    My mother has been receiving a widow’s pension following my father’s death in October 1991 based upon his employment in the U.K. She herself worked in the U.K. for approximately 15 years. Is she entitled to receive a pension on her own right in addition to the widow’s pension or the difference bwtween the two if her pension were to calculate out higher. She is 83 years old and has never applied to receive a pension based upon her own employment. We reside in the U.S.A.

    Thank you.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Colin, your mother would be entitled to the greater of the pension from her husband and the one she would be entitled to in her own right, but not both.

  185. Roger Smith says:

    I am 66 and due to claim my deferred Starte Pension in JANUARY 2015,my wife has decided to retire in December with me she will be 58 in January 2015 , she seems to think I will be entitled to claim the married couples pension , but I would have thought we wouldn’t qualify for that until she is 65 . Which one of us is right , I would welcome your advice .Many thanks

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Roger, normally the married couples pension top up only applied when both people reached pension age. However, the law is changing in 2016 and the spousal pension is being eliminated for any new retirees after that time. Does your wife have National Insurance credits in her own name? If not, unfortunately she will not be entitled to a spousal pension at all.

  186. Adrian Davies says:

    Hi I am British born and lived and worked in the UK until 40, I now live in Canada for last 13 years, as I don’t qualify for a full pension over here in Canada can i claim a part pension from the UK based on the years i paid tax and NI contributions?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Adrian, absolutely you can claim a partial UK pension. Depending on your age, you may still be able to make additional voluntary contributions which will increase it. Join us, and we will send you a complete package on what to do next.

  187. Hi
    I hope this is not too complex, I worked in the UK between 1968 and 1998 then moved to Australia where after 3 years I I took citizenship, in 6 years I intend to retire aged 67 and move to the Philippine’s where my partner is from and spend half the year there and half the year here in Australia, would I be entitled to a UK pension and if so when in the Philippines would it be at the unfrozen amount, also would it be better to be paid into the Philippines, Australian or UK bank?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Peter, not too complex at all. You are indeed entitled to a full British pension. Yes, the Philippines is an unfrozen country, so you would be entitled to the unfrozen amount while you are there. If you are going to be 6 month resident in the Philippines, you might consider making that your permanent resident address from a UK pension standpoint. That way, you should be able to claim an indexed pension for the whole year.
      You would also need to take into account the income tax situation, and tax residency requirements in both the Philippines and Australia. That is beyond my scope of advice. Purely from a UK pension point of view, residency in the Philippines is better

  188. Larry Ross says:

    Hi,
    I know I must be elegible for 15 years pension from the UK. 1964 to 1980. could you tell me how do I start my claim? who do I contact?
    Can I do it on the computer?
    I am now retired and 65 years old. Born 1949

    Thanks
    LWR

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Larry, the best thing to do is join us. We are a non profit volunteer organization. We will send you a complete package of information on how to apply for your pension, and how to make some additional voluntary contributions

  189. Hello Sir,
    I am from Romania , born in 1965, i worked in UK as a Senior care assistant in a Nursing Home in 2005-2007 , i got a NI nr card, that means i already payed the contribution in these 2 years of work .Now i will came back to work in uk as a RG nurse,then I want to know if my NI number is still available and if i can pay some voluntary contribution for the years i lost from 2007 to 2014 to reach a minimum 10 years to obtain a pension when i will reach the age, there is a plan for this, and how much i have to pay for this?? I am greatful and thank you very much for yr answer !!!

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Carmen, yes, your NI number is still available, and yes, you can make some back payments to catch up on missing years. The amount you pay will depend on what your employment status is in the UK. You would need to contact the Dept of Works and Pensions in the UK once you arrive there

  190. Hi David,

    Wondering if you can help and sorry if already covered this.

    I was born in 1983 and am 31. I have worked in the UK for a total of 13 years (9 years full time and 4 part time).

    I am planning to work in Australia for a couple of years and maybe stay permanently (still undecided) .

    Would I qualify for the full UK state pension per week or would I need to make top up contributions to NI directly to the UK from the income I earn in Australia?

    Thanks,
    Vimal

    • David Morris says:

      Hello James, given your age, you will need 35 years of contributions for a full pension. You likely have enough right now to qualify for a partial pension. You would need to make voluntary contributions to get to the full amount, and yes, you can make those contributions to the UK from anywhere in the world, from income earned locally

  191. Peter Warren says:

    Hi David:
    D-of-B: 01/10/1941. Worked on Fleet Street as a reporter for two years
    between ages of 16 and 18 and paid NI premiums. Please advise if I can
    claim. I immigrated and have been in Canada since the age of 20,
    citizen since the age of 25. Thank you so much.

    • David Morris says:

      Hi Peter, sorry, but you needed 11 years of work contributions to be eligible, and it is too late to buy back any years

    • I lived in UK from 2005 till 2011.my date of birth is 26/03/1969 I contributed to UK Ni for more then 6 years. Will I get any state pension when I am retired. I. am not UK national. I moved to Pakistan in 2011. How can I pay additional contributionb to top up my pension ? Please send me pack or information. Email : imtisal.pasha@gmail.com
      Many thanks

      • David Morris says:

        Hello Pasha, you do not need to be a UK citizen to qualify for a state pension. Based on your age, you will need 10 years of contributions, and you can make voluntary top up payments from where you are. If you join us, we will send you a complete package of information on how to go about this.

        • Thanks Davis,
          Will I get any credits ? Hm revenue website says volunteer contribution is 13.75 UK pounds per week for year 2013/14. Can I pay 2.75 pounds a week for gaps? Will my pension be static and not increased with inflation rate because I am not UK/EEA national? It does not make sense as Ni contribution change with inflation then why not weekly pension increases with inflation for non UK residents. Is there any way I can be allowed to pay less then 13.75 pounds a week? Does a state pensioner who is not UK/EEA and mutual pension agreement country ( such as Pakistan) national gets any other benefits other then monthly state pension when he/she is not UK resident?
          Many thanks,
          Pasha

          • David Morris says:

            Hello Pasha, a lot of questions. The government does not encourage the cheaper Class 2 voluntary contribution. You have to write to them and ask for it. If you join us, we can tell what the rules are, and how best to apply. Your pension will not increase with inflation while you are in Pakistan. That is why we are fighting hard to get the Government to change that policy. In terms of other benefits, the only one you will be entitled to is the UK State pension.

  192. Tom Thomas says:

    Hi . I was told I may be able to receive a pension . I was born in Guildford England in 1962. (My father was a Canadian Naval officer Stationed in England at the time. )A few months after I was born my parents and I moved back to Canada and I have lived in Canada ever since. Any advice?

  193. Mairi Parris says:

    Hi,

    I was born in Dec 1951 – I worked for 6 years + before emigrating to Canada. Would I be eligible for a partial pension?

    Thanks.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Mairi, yes, you are entitled to a partial UK pension. You also still have the opportunity to increase it by buying back a few years. Your pension date was in 2013, so don’t delay in applying, as you will eventually lose the ability to buy back

  194. Hi David,

    I have worked in the UK as a registered nurse for 7 years. I am not sure if NI contributions was mandatory for nurses.I am wondering if I am eligible for a UK pension when I retire. I now currently reside in Canada . Thank you for your response in advance.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Rossanna, I need to know your date of birth to tell you what your eligibility is. As a nurse, you would have paid NI, so those 7 years should count.

  195. Just to double check, are 5 years the minimum contribution to be entitled to a partial basic pension?
    I was born in 1984.
    Thank you!

  196. Hi. My grand father lived and worked in England for 6 years. Now he lives in Canada for the past 20 years. Is he eligible for the english pension and if he is how can apply?

  197. Hi,I have worked in UK for a couple of years and now live abroad. Am I entitled ? Im 61 years of age and never received anything to date.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Rose, you will need 10 years of contributions to qualify, and your pension age is 66. The good news is that you still have time to make voluntary contributions to get you to 10 years

  198. Hi I am Krystyna I worked in UK for 4 years and I paid NI contributions.I was born in January 1962 .Can you let me know if I qualify for some Pension.Thanks

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Krystyna, you only needed 1 year to qualify, so yes, you are entitled to a partial UK pension. You are also still able to buy back a few years to increase it.

  199. I am 66yrs and getting a small UK pension. Am I eligible for contribution? What would I get in return?
    Thank you

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Len, yes you are still eligible to make a few voluntary contributions. What you get is 1/30 of the full pension for every year you buy back.
      If you join us, we can give you more information on how to do that.

  200. Phil Daly says:

    Silly question maybe. I was born in England in 1950 and the family immigrated to Canada in 1955. I plan on returning to England for retirement. Would I be entitled to any Social Benefits . Thanks, Phil

    • David Morris says:

      hello Phil, you only qualify for a State pension if you have employment history there. You may be eligible for other old age benefits, but I can’t really answer about those as the rules have changed considerably. We only focus on the State pension here

  201. Hi David
    Just wondering if it’s worth me joining your service?
    My wife and i are both British citizens living in South Africa. I worked in the UK from the age of 19 to 27 making full contributions every year – she worked from 2002-2007 also contributing to national insurance. Even though we are both still 30 years off retiring i want to keep making contributions to the UK state pension so we don’t lose out on our entitlement. How would we go about doing this and what do you recommend?
    Thanks for any assistance.
    Keith.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Keith, I may be biased, but yes, it is worth joining us. You are smart to be planning for your future retirement already. As it stands, both you and your wife do not have enough contribution years yet to qualify, but the good news is that you can make voluntary contributions until you reach the maximum needed of 35 years. This is most definitely worth doing, from a financial perspective.
      If you join, we will send you a package of information on how to get started, and how best to make voluntary contributions. We also keep you abreast of the changing rules of pensions in the UK.

  202. Janette Sumner says:

    HI there I was born in the IOM in 1955 and emigrated to canada 1984… I did work a number of years and also was a mother for the last 4 of those years .I am now 60 and would like to know if I am eligible to receive and uk pension .I have my health card No HZGJ 244 (old one ) and I know my SIN number Insurance No Im not sure if it is an old style… My husband .died in May 12 2012 he had stayed in england after we seperated ,,, and as I was separated I dont know if I will get any pension from him or if he even payed into the NiI I can give you more info as needed thanks Jan

    • David Morris says:

      hello Janette, yes you should be eligible for a partial state pension from the Isle of Man. It operates separately from the UK system, but I believe the basic rules are similar. I do not know if you can make voluntary payments, but if the rules are similar to the UK, you would be able to.

  203. Ken Carter says:

    I am drawing a full British State Pension. My Canadian wife is drawing a pension from the UK also of 59.9% of what I get. Can you tell me if the revised pension deal will affect us i.e. will our pensions increase when the new rules amounts are enacted in 2016?

    Also I am trying to sort out death or survivor benefits for my wife should I pass on first. I am 66 years old, she is 64 in November.

    If/when I pass on, does she qualify for a widows pension/bereavement benefit and if so what is the amount?. I know the wording has changed but I am sure you know what I mean.

    My dad just passed away at age 85 and my mum got almost the same as dad was drawing when he was alive.

    I fully intend to live in Canada or somewhere else until I pass on.

    Appreciate your assistance in this matter. The reason I ask is that I read somewhere that to get a bereavement benefit you must be under 45 which does not make sense to me.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Ken,
      The new pension legislation will not affect you or your spouse in any way. it only affects people retiring after 2016.
      When you die, your spouse’s pension will increase to be the level of yours.
      She will also be entitled to a one time Bereavement payment.
      If you join us, we can provide you with more details on all of this

  204. Ian K Brown says:

    Hello David ,

    I am hoping to get a bit of the good advice your giving .

    I have lived and worked all over the world and have never paid much attention to pension schemes . Im now aware that I can try and make some payments and try to get some support in my later years .
    I have worked in the UK for a few years in 1990′s , then in NZ as a High school teacher . Now have moved to Oman as a teacher and have some financial flexability to put money into the UK pension scheme . Im 44 years old born in 1970 and plan to come back and work in UK in a few years time . Thats still only leaves me 20ish years to do the best i can to get to 35 years of contributions .
    Do you have any advice on how I should go about getting my payments made , how much and who to , over the next few years here in tax free Oman , before I come home to put my shoulder to the wheel there .?

    Very grateful for any advice you can offer .

    Sincerely Ian

    • David Morris says:

      Hi Ian, first thing is that you can definitely make voluntary pension payments towards the UK pension from where you are, and it is a very good financial deal to do that. You can even buy back up to 6 years. Yu will reach pension age in 2037, so that gives you 23 years to make contributions, plus buy back 6 years, plus whatever credits you already have. You should be pretty close to 35.
      The best thing to do is join us. We will send you a package of information on how to make voluntary contributions – especially at the Class 2 rate, which is substantially cheaper.

  205. hi there, great site very good reading. I lived in the uk for five years and have made contributions, I now live back in my native Ireland, I believe we can consolidate our uk and irish contributions but I wonder if that is wise? would it be better for me to pay voluntary contributions for a further 5 years to my uk pension?

    any advice would be greatly appreciated, thanks paul

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Paul, your pension situation is governed by the European rules on pension harmonization. Any work experience in the EU counts towards an EU pension. I can’t really help with this, as I am not knowledgeable enough on the European setup or rules. This website is primarily for people eligible for a UK pension, who do not live in the EU. Sorry I cant help more.

  206. Mardie Kennedy says:

    Hi..

    Am A widow of a bristish guy from Ireland and his 58 years old when he died here in philipiines..i never been to UK or ireland my self his the only one going back and forth there to visit a family. Before he died he said he been in Royal Airforce when he was young for 5 years and i dont know about any insurance that he pay as i dont have any information left for me to know about pension.. So my question if I am eligeble to any pension state or anything as his widow here in the Philipines as we married here..

    hoping for you advice and more information about this matter..

    thanks and regards
    mardie

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Mardie, I can’t really help you about anything from the Royal Airforce. Depending on your date of birth, and how long he worked in the UK, and his date of birth,you may be eligible for something. I would need to know this first, though

  207. pamela needham says:

    Hi, i haven’t worked for about 10 years due to ill health but i am paying voluntary national insurance contributions so as to get my state pension. I am 51 years old and i am thinking of moving to spain to live in our holiday home. my husband is self employed and will continue to work in the uk until he retires.
    I am frightened that i may not get my pension even though i will make sure i will pay the correct contributions.
    Can you offer any advise please.
    We will not have a permanent address in the uk and my husband will stay in his caravan and use his work for mail or get a p o box. Becoming a Spanish citizen wouldn’t have any implications would it?
    Thank you
    Pam Needham

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Pamela, living in Spain, or becoming a Spanish citizen has no bearing on your pension entitlement. As long as you have made your contributions, and the UK Government confirms that, your pension is in no danger.

  208. Margaret Leckie says:

    I retire at age 64 in 2017 under the new single tier system . I will have 30 yrs contribution . 9 worked , 11 bought back and 10 annual payments . That would have given me the full pension under the old rules .

    I will now get a pro-rated single tier pension .I know it will be close to the pension (including spousal amount) that I would have received under the old rules . I was wondering if I can buy another 5 yrs to get the maximum.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Margaret, we don’t know for sure yet what arrangements might be available to buy additional years, and at what cost. Whatever pension you get under the new rules will be no less than what you would have got under the old rules. If you have already bought back all the years available, then you can only hope that they make some additional years available.

  209. Hi David,
    Male born UK July 1953. Emigrated to Australia & raised from1959 up until now.
    Retuned to UK to work in two periods: 1971 -7 3 & 1978 -1980, don’t have possession on NI card No.
    Intend to return to uk and work until retirement age 2018, which would realise approx 7 year NI contributions.
    Upon returning to UK is it possible to make voluntary payments (3 years) to boost to ten years to qualify for partial pension.
    Thank you.
    Lawrie

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Lawrie, yes, you can make voluntary payments, but be aware that you cant make a voluntary payment in the year you reach pension age.You can actually make them now, before you return to the UK, plus you can also buy back some years. You would be better doing that than waiting until 2018

      • Hi David,
        Thanks very much for your reply.
        Please ignore my reply sent just now re “awaiting moderation”.
        I just need a bit of clarity in regard to your comments.

        1. If I elect Not to return and work in the UK this year, will I still be eligible for a partial pension, given my paid work NICs would be related to the 2 periods listed above 1971 – 73 & 1978 – 1980. By not working 2014 – 18 that would rule out 4 years of NICs? Basically is it vital that I do return and work 2014 – 18 to be eligible for a partial pension.
        If I remain eligible for which ever stance Return or Not I would like some pointers on the following:
        2. How would I make a voluntary payment in my pension year i.e 2018,
        3. How do I make them now?
        4. How do I buy back years now i.e before 2018?

        thank you
        Lawrie

        • David Morris says:

          Hello Lawrie, the easiest way to help you is for you to join us. We will send you a complete package of information that should answer all your questions. You don’t need to return and work in the UK to qualify. You can make voluntary payments from where you are. We explain how to do that. You can join up right on the website

    • Hi David,
      My request received an awaiting moderation reply dated 4 October, can I please get a reply to my original request for information.
      thank you
      Lawrie

  210. John Carroll says:

    Hello,
    I’ve just sent off my BR19 form re UK pension statement and await a reply re tracing NIN etc. I’m also anxious to be able to top-up my contributions over the next twelve months or so, once in receipt of my statement. Thanks to this great site, Ive been able to garner very useful information, and so for this reason decided this morning to ‘join’ and give a small donation as well. Thank you.

    In the coming months, I’m sure I’ll be asking for more information re my personal situation. However, if I may ask a question on a friends behalf.

    Born in the UK, now living in Canada, he contributed for 27 years into the UK pension.. He is married to a Canadian lady (never been to the UK), and is of the opinion that she will receive 65% of [u]his[/u] pension? Now, I can’t find anything about this anywhere on the UK government website and fear he’s been mislead?

    Thanks for any and all help,

    John.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello John, thanks for joining us.
      The situation with the spouse of your friend is based solely on her age. If she reaches pension age after April 1, 2016 she will not be entitled to a spousal pension. If she reaches pension age prior to that, then she will be entitled.

      • John Carroll says:

        Thanks for reply Dave, now comes the tricky part, finding out her age. But further to that, my (Canadian born) wife, is sixty five next month. She also worked in the UK for about 15 months back in the day. Am I to assume that she also qualifies for some UK pension funds?

        Sorry if I’m overloading here.

        John

        • David Morris says:

          Hello John, no problem.
          Your spouse is indeed entitled to a spousal UK pension, (Class B) based on your contribution record. It will be roughly equivalent to 60% of your own pension.

  211. I left school at 16, and, due to a serious of degenerative health problems, have been classed disabled ever since and been on life-long disability. Would I still qualify for state pension?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Beth, your eligibility for a UK state pension is based on contributions through employment. I’m afraid that you don’t qualify. Sorry.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Beth, sorry, but eligibility for the UK state pension is based on contributions made through employment.

  212. I live in South Africa and already receive a British pension. I have heard that my wife who is South African and who has never worked in UK might, under certain circumstances, be eligible for a Category B pension? Is this correct and if so under what circumstances and how may I apply.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello JR, if your wife reaches retirement age before April 1 2016, then she is likely eligible for a spousal pension (Category B). If you join us, we can help you with how to apply.

      • John Kaye says:

        Hi David, thank you for the response – my wife retires from work at the end of this year but will only be 60 during August 2016 so it appears that she will no longer be eligible – is that due a imminent change in the pension law?
        Regards, John

        • David Morris says:

          Hello John, yes, the law is changing in 2016. After that date, no new spousal pensions will be permitted

  213. Hi, I have worked continuously in the uk for 4 years contributing to the national insurance. I now live in Australia. Can I contribute another 6 yrs insurance whilst I live in Australia in order to obtain at 63 years of age 1/3 of the full pension.?
    How much per annum would I have to contribute ? Is it worth it ?

  214. Hello

    very informative site – thank you
    Born in UK 1964 just turned 50
    I worked full time from Jan 81 to May 83 in local govt in the UK.. Then full time from June 83 to Aug 92 in the Royal Air Force. So seems to me I have ten years albeit aggregated. Any advise of eligibility and how to claim

    Mark

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Mark, you should be eligible for a partial pension already, but the good news is that you can continue to make voluntary contributions to increase that pension, and can even buy back a few years. The easiest next step is for you to join us. We will send you a complete package of information on how to make voluntary payments, apply for a pension forecast, and possibly be eligible to make Class 2 voluntary contributions, which are substantially cheaper

  215. peter gorman says:

    dob December 1934. Worked, after National Service, from 1957 to 1996. Does the state pension stop when I immigrate to Canada?

    • peter gorman says:

      what do you mean by ‘awaiting moderation’?

      • David Morris says:

        Hello Peter. “awaiting moderation” simply means that your comment, or question, has to be approved for publication. It is a way of preventing spam and junk posts from clogging up the website.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Peter, no the state pension does not stop when you immigrate to Canada. However, it is frozen at the amount you first receive. No cost of living increases. This is why our organization exists, to lobby the British Government to change that policy

  216. JACQUELINE BARBARA KNEUBUHLER says:

    I was born in 1951 in Brighton, UK . I worked in the UK from 1968 until 1975 when I moved to Switzerland.and have been there ever since. I retire in July 2015 when I will be 64 years old.
    Am I entitled to a partial pension from the UK ? Thanks for your advice.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Jacqueline, you actually reached pension age in 2012, and yes, you are entitled to a partial UK pension. You can also still buy back a couple of years to increase it, plus you have the option of either a lump sum back dated to 2012, or an increased weekly amount going forward.
      If you join us, we can help you get started by sending you a complete information package

  217. Hi Mr Morris

    I am born in 1958, a Danish citizen, worked 2-3 years in Denmark and moved to the UK to study. while I was still PhD student, I started work full time in London in July 2003 and still at job. I am planning to leave work and the UK next year, may be to make some freelance jobs in another country.
    My question is, do I qualify for the UK state pension when I reach age 66 years?
    Another thing, that the first 2-3 years of my employment in the UK, I was paying taxes and NI on my student NI number. Is it going to affect my contribution? What I should do to make it better.
    One thing more, In case I am qualified for the UK State Pension, how much I could get annually/monthly? And can I get my pension where ever I reside? And what I can do to increase my pension?
    Thanks a lot for your help.
    Kind Regards
    Yasmin

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Yasmin, you already have more than the minimum work needed, so yes, you will qualify for a UK pension. The thing to keep in mind is that if you move to another EU country, then all your work experience in the UK gets credited automatically towards a pension, whichever EU country you retire to. That is because the EU pensions are harmonized. In that scenario you don’t need to increase your UK pension, because you will be contributing to the pension system in whichever EU country you live in, and it all gets added up together, so that you only get 1 pension. If you move to a non Eu country, then it would be smart to make voluntary contributions to the UK pension scheme, so that you could qualify for that AND a local pension.
      In terms of your student NI number, to the best of my knowledge, you only have one NI number.
      In terms of amount, I can only tell you what a full UK pension is now. The amount will be different when you reach retirement age. for 2014/2015 a full UK pension is £113 a week

      • Thank you very much Mr Morris.
        It is very helpful.

        Kind Regards
        Yasmin

        • Britta Schulz says:

          Hi Yasmin,

          even if you move to a EU country, it would be smart to make voluntary contributions to the UK system, because you will get the voluntary pension on top of a pro rata-pension from the EU-regulations.

          Kind regards

          Britta Schulz

  218. Jeremy Ranson says:

    Hello. I am A British citizen born in 1954. I have lived in the US since 1982 as a permanent resident. I worked from 1972 to 1981 in the UK, with the exception of a year and a half when I was in Australia ( I worked a year there). I understand I need 10 years to qualify for a pension and can make 6 voluntary contributions before retirement age, hopefully at Class 2 rates. My question is, if I am eligible for the Class 2 rate, can I also buy back years at that rate? Or are buy back years at the higher Class 3 rate?. This stuff is all new to me. Until recently I didn’t know it was possible. One last question, can you still help me if I live in the US or do you just represent people in Canada? If you can assist me I will join your group since I do not know my NI number and have no idea if I can qualify for Class 2 payments. Thanks.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Jeremy, we certainly assist any UK pensioner, regardless of where they live. If you are eligible to make voluntary contributions at the Class 2 rate, then you should also be eligible to buy back years at that rate.
      Once you join, we send you an info package on how to find out your NI number, how to get a pension statement, make voluntary contributions etc. Class 2 can be difficult to qualify for, but we explain what is needed.

  219. Paul Phillips says:

    I am a British Citizen but have lived in Canada for the last 34 years . I was born in 1953 and my wife in 1959. I commenced work in the Uk July 1970 and worked for 10 years. My wife worked for 5 years untill August 1980 when we emmigrated to Canada. Since It would be Oct 2018 before i turned 65 in 2018 it would be right to assume i could make Voluntary payments for the next 4 years, Where as my wife who was born in January 1959 can make voluntary payments
    for the next 11 years untill Jan 2025 when she will be 66 . I am currently Self employed (Semi retired) whilst my wife is fully employed as Office Manager at a Wellness centre. Question is would we both be eligable to “buy back” previouse
    years . How will the new rules effect us in 2017.

    As soon as i have finished this I will be applying to join you.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Paul, yes, you both can make voluntary contributions until you reach retirement age, and you can also both buy back some years. It usually is a minimum of 6 years you can buy back each, but you may also have the option to buy back certain additional specific years that they will advise you of.
      The new rules come into being in 2016, and you both come under them. The main changes are that you will need a minimum of 10 years to be eligible for a partial pension, and that spousal pensions are no longer allowed. The basic state pension itself is increasing as well. If you both make voluntary contributions, and buy back the years you are allowed, you will easily qualify for a partial pension
      Thank you for joining us

  220. J.Flowerday says:

    Hello there,
    I worked in the UK for 5 years up to June 1984 where I left the UK to go to South Africa. If I should return to the UK when I reach 65 would I receive a British pension? I was born in October 1961.Can I pay in a contribution at all to boost any pension payment/
    Thanks
    J.Flowerday

    • David Morris says:

      Hello J Flowerday, providing you have the minimum of 10 years contributions, you would be eligible for a partial UK pension no matter where you live. The good news is that you are able to make voluntary contributions and some catch up payments while you are abroad that should more than get you the 10 years you need. If you join us, we send you a package of information on how to go about doing this. It is an excellent financial deal to make these voluntary payments

  221. jenny bryson says:

    Hello… my husband was born in England in 1955.. he worked there for 25yrs … he came to Australia 9yrs ago and we married 5yrs ago.. he passed away at the beginning of this year.. am i entitled to any of his pension I am 55 .. i am an Australian and have never worked in England…some one told me it could be just a lump sum i get and not the actual pension.. can you please inform me

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Jenny, your situation is very complicated. One thing for sure is that you will not be entitled to any basic state pension, as unfortunately you come under the new rules after 2016, where no new spousal pensions are allowed. Depending on whether your husband had any additional state pension, you may be entitled to that, and you may also be entitled to a bereavement sum.
      You need to contact the Dept of Pensions in the UK about this, as it is complex because of the new pension legislation coming into force.

  222. Anne Patterson says:

    I was born on April 2, 1941 and moved to the US in 1964. I worked for 8 years while in England. Do I qualify for a pension plan.

  223. vivienne katz says:

    I was born in England in 1948. I worked for ten years in England. I emigrated to the USA in 1977. I am about to apply for my social security benefit in the US on my 66th birthday. Am I entitled to any pension from the U.K.
    When I left England I informed the UK government and they sent me a rebate for any UK taxes paid by me.
    Please advise. Thanking you in advance.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Vivienne, you are of the age group that needed 10 years of work contributions, so it is very likely that you are indeed eligible for a partial UK pension. We can help you to get started if you join us. We will send you an information package on how to claim your pension.

  224. Hello,

    My DOB is 17/09/1984 and I’m Irish.

    I worked as a teacher in the uk for 3 years from 2009-2012. So I’ve made three years of state and teacher contributions.

    If I understand correctly I need at least 10 years of state contributions to claim? So could I make up 7 years in voluntary contribution? I’m living abroad and really don’t want to return to the uk just to make pension contributions. Is there a limit to how long I left the uk before I can make voluntary contributions?

    Also if ten years entitles me to a third of a Uk pension does the same apply to an Irish one which is slightly more money. Can I then just take a third of a state pension in any EU country?

    Also can I just claim my teacher pension whenever (what little of it there is)?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Lynda, you come under the EU rules for pensions, which is not my expertise. However, my understanding is that they are harmonized throughout the EU. In other words, any work experience in the UK is counted, along with work experience anywhere else within the EU. That means your UK record will be counted towards your Irish pension. If you are working in Ireland, there should be no need to make back payments in the UK, as you are being credited now with pension credits. You wont get credited twice, so there should be no need to make extra UK payments.

      In terms of your teachers pension, I can’t help you. Every company pension has different rules. You need to contact the teachers union in the UK

  225. I worked in England for 20 years for an employer and now live in the US and have been self employed since 1994. I want to catch up on my national insurance contributions. Can I pay the class 2? also my husband has 28 years contirubtions in england. He was self employed when we left and he has been self employed in the US since 1994. Are we both eligible to pay class 2 contributions to catch up?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Anne, you both may be able to make Class 2 payments. It isn’t always easy, as the pension dept. don’t typically advise you about this. You have to ask, and sometimes insist.
      If you join us, we provide our members with an information package on how to make voluntary contributions, and catch up payments, and how to qualify for class 2.

  226. Hi David
    We were born in the UK and he worked as a teacher for around 5-6 years (and a nursing assistant prior to that). We moved to Australia in 1989. My husband passed away almost five years ago in 2009 (he was born in Oct 1050). Do you know if i qualify for any pension? I do not have his NI number or teacher registration number.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Nicky, yes, your husband was entitled to a partial state pension, and you would be entitled to a spousal pension based on his contributions when you reach state pension age, providing you have not remarried or formed a new civil union by then.
      If you join us, we will send you an information package on how to apply, including how to find out his NI number.

  227. I lived in uk for 4 years and worked four years so is my husband and my husband lived for 5 years worked and we moved back to canada we have lived in canada almost 40 years now my husband is deceased and I lost him a year ago I am a widower I received a letter for my husband from uk statepension office to apply for the statepension since I am collecting cpp and in 2 months I will be 65 years old still working will be getting my old age pension do I qualify to received the ukstatepension I would like to know and about how much per month .

    I would like to hear from you about this information.

    Thank you

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Minta, if your husband only worked in the UK for 5 years, then he would not be eligible for any UK pension, and unfortunately neither would you. Sorry

  228. Sandra Hava says:

    Hi David,
    I am an Australian citizen who lived and worked in the UK for 5 years – 1071 – 1076 My birthday is 07/02/1948.
    Am I eligible for a British part-pension?

    Kind regards,
    Sandra

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Sandra, unfortunately you needed 10 years of work contributions to be eligible, and it is now too late to make back payments. Sorry

    • Stephanie Oda says:

      I was born in 1943 in Ireland. I earned 186 credits there and they told me I needed 260. However, I also worked full time 20 months in the UK. I don’t know how many credits that would amount to. Can you give me an estimate. If I combine my UK credits with my Irish ones I might quality for a partial pension through UE rule.
      Thank you

      • David Morris says:

        Hello Stephanie, I’m afraid I don’t know very much about the EU pension rules, or how credits are gained. You would need to take that up with the pension authorities in Ireland.

  229. Fran Pollard says:

    Hi, I was born 6 May 1947 in the UK. I worked full time from approx. July 1963 to Jan 1967 before moving to Australia. From the information I’ve read it seems that I need 10 years working in UK to qualify for a pension. I wonder if I may be able to make a top-up payment – are there any restrictions in terms of how many years or a total monetary limit? I’m guessing that even if I can make a top-up payment it probably won’t be worth it for the amount I’d have to pay and the part-pension amount I’d receive back?
    Thanks.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Fran, yes, you needed 10 years of NI contributions. You may be able to claim a further 3 years for the period you were raising children, but that still won’t get you to 10 years. Unfortunately, it is now too late to buy back any years. Sorry

  230. I was born in the uk in November, 1951. I started work in the spring of 1966 and emigrated to Canada in 1974 having worked all those years. Am I entitled to a UK pension? If so would it be worth topping it up to get the maximum? I don’t have my national insurance number.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Jennifer, yes, you do qualify for a UK pension. You have already reached pension age, so you have only a limited opportunity to top it up. Any pension you claim will be backdated to your pension age in 2013.
      If you join us, we can help you with claiming your pension, including how to obtain your NI number

  231. David Morris says:

    Hello Susan, we are not the Government. We don’t send pension cheques to anybody. You need to contact the Dept of Pensions in the UK

  232. Rosemary Maartens says:

    My name is Rosemary Maartens and I was born in Kent 13.031946.
    My parents emigrated to South Africa when I was one year old.
    I am in possession of a British passport.
    Do I qualify for a British pension.

  233. Loraine Pieterse says:

    I am a South African and have lived and worked in the UK from 2001 to 2011. I have British Citizenship but have moved to South Africa. Am I allowed to claim this UK pension when I retire?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Loraine, yes, you should be eligible for a UK pension. If I knew your date of birth I could give you more specific information, but it looks like you qualify.

  234. Hi David , my parents are British citizens and worked in UK for few yrs before moving to
    Australia,here they have lived for about 35 yrs,if they move back to London would they qualify for benefits or pension?
    They are just under 65 and would pretty much have to start all over again in UK,any help is greatly appreciated. Cheers

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Deb, I am not really up to date with programs and services available in the UK for retirees. The basic state pension is based on National Insurance contributions made through work, or by voluntary payments. If they only have a few years work experience, it wouldn’t be a very big pension. There may be other benefits available to pensioners resident there, though. You should contact one of the government service centres in the UK

  235. Hello David, I was born in Scotland 28/02/1950, and I had to retire at 56 thro illness and have paid my dues for 37 years, my question is I have been told that my weekly pension in February when I’m 65 will be £113 per week, but I have spoken to a few friends round about the same age and they all get between £142 – £170 per week, can you advise me what I should do and if I’m due any top ups, thank you.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Jan, if you live in the UK, your best bet is to contact one of the Government service centres. Our focus here is on British pensioners living abroad, whose pensions are frozen. If you live in the UK, there may be other benefits that you can claim that I am not up to date on.

  236. Tim Taylor says:

    I was born in the UK 25/03/51 and have over 30 years contributions. I have been married to a US citizen for 12 years and have lived over here since 2001. My wife’s DOB is 29/08/49, is she eligible for a cat B pension, thanks.

  237. Alan Luscott says:

    I was granted a permanent certificate in 2000.
    I have lived in Canada since 1997. In 2013 I obtained Canadian citizenship. My date of birth is 31/10/1949. I worked in the UK up until the time I emigrated toCaada .Advise me as to my rights to claim a UK pension. Am I able to have it deposited in a bank in the UK?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Alan, yes, you are entitled to a UK pension. You can also buy back some years to increase it. You can have it deposited in a UK Bank.

  238. Denise Mouter says:

    My husband is still paying his UK pension contributions every year and retires January 2016. He will have either 29 or 30 years paid by then.
    Question: If it is 29 years , can he pay one more before he reaches retirement age and starts to collect?

    I was born in March 1952 and altho qualify for a small pension in my own right, would I be able to claim a spousal pension ? ( I believe it is 60% of my husbands)

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Denise, yes he will be able to do that. You are also entitled to a spousal pension equal to 60% of his.

  239. Hello,
    I live in Greece and work on and off in the Uk as a locum doctor. I do not think I will ever complete 10 years in UK employment, and it is not in my plans to move to the Uk permanently.
    I was wondering what can be done with these contributions paid so far. Could I claim them back in the future, if I do not get a pension from the UK at retirement age? Or am I still entitled to a symbolic pension because of them, when I reach retirement age?
    The agency I worked for, suggested that as I am self-employed in my country, I could invoice them from there, and then Social Insurance would be added up in my salary. I would accept that, only if these contributions are not of any other use to me.
    Thank you very much for our answer.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Dennis, as you live in the EU, pensions are harmonized. That means that any contributions you make towards a UK pension will also count towards a Greek state pension, and vice versa. You can not get a refund on your UK contributions, but you can make voluntary payments to ensure that you get your 10 years credit towards a UK pension.
      The EU pension arrangements are complex, and not really our area of expertise.

  240. Deborah Duncan says:

    Hi David,
    I am English, born May 1954 and began working July 1969. I worked until September 1979 when I left to emigrate with my Australian husband to Australia where I have lived and worked since. would I need to ‘top up’ my contribution as I believe I am eligible to claim a part pension – 1/3. Secondly, I wonder if my husband would be eligible too? he worked only for 6 months in the UK in 1979. My final question is when should I begin my application as I don’t turn 63 until 11 May 2017?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Deborah, your actual pension age is 65. You reach your pension date in November, 2019. You will need 10 years, and it looks like you have that. You can still make voluntary top up payments to increase that pension, and it is usually recommended to do that. You don’t have to actually apply for your pension until a few months before your date, but you can make voluntary payments, and buy back years at any time.
      Your husband would only be eligible for a spousal pension if he reached retirement age before April 2016. He would not be eligible for a pension otherwise

  241. richard jones says:

    hi great site my DOB is 11/11/1958 I emigrated to Canada in March 1987 how does my pension stand can I top it up and can I claim full pension if I visit the UK when I retire thanks

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Richard, You will need 10 years of NI contributions. You didn’t tell me how many years you worked in the UK. Sounds like you have 10 at least. The good news is that you can top it up, and also buy back some years, so you should be in good shape. Yes, you receive the current indexed value of your pension whenever you visit the UK or Europe

  242. Kay Jeffeires says:

    my dob is 08/08/1952 i worked in England for about 20 years then I immigrated to Canada in april 1980. I am looking for my nhs not quite sure how to go about that? then I’m hoping to apply for a pension. I f you can help in anyway that would be appreciate that. please and thank you

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Kay, you are certainly eligible for a UK pension, and still have time to increase it by buying back some years. You reach pension age in January 2015.
      The best thing you can do is join us. We will give you a complete package of information on how to find your NI number, make voluntary payments, and apply for a pension forecast.
      We are a not for profit, volunteer based group aimed at supporting British pensioners in Canada, and lobbying the British Government to index our pension to inflation.

  243. Tony Hillier says:

    I was born in uk 28.12.50 and have a local authority 16 yrs teacher’s pension. At my death, if I have a wife I am told by my pension people she will be eligible for a small pension.

    What if she lives in Tanzania, will she still be paid it?

    Now a very, very basic question I am embarrassed not to know the answer!! … Additionally, I qualify for my state pension in Jan 2016, upon my death again, (long way away of course!!) will any of that pension be due to her and if so if she then lives abroad. (I don’t know how state pension works)

    Thanks for any info .

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Tony, I cant really answer about your occupational pensions, but I don’t see why country of residence will affect it. In terms of the state pension, it depends on your wife’s date of birth as to whether she will be eligible for a spousal pension. The rules are changing. If she reaches pension age after April 1, 2016, she will not be eligible for any spousal pension. If she reaches pension age before that date, she will. Unfortunately, it is as black and white as that.

  244. Ian Abraham says:

    I had a work permit from Aug 1966 to Aug1968 whilst I was studying in the U.K. then I joined the RAF from Sep 1968 to Apr 1975. Am I available for a Government pension even though I receive a small Services Pension? I have been living in Venezuela since 1975.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Ian, service in the forces does count towards a government pension. I need to know your date of birth to tell you what you need to qualify

    • David Morris says:

      hello Ian, based on your DOB, you need 11 years of work contributions to qualify for a partial pension. It doesn’t look like you quite have that, but you may still be able to buy back two or three years, which may get you there. You are certainly close. You need to get a pension statement as soon as possible, to find out if you made it.

  245. Lisa Helder says:

    This is one of the best sites on pension info I have come across! Such a good job! Well done!

    I have one question and will be so thankful if you could help me. My father is not a UK citizen but has worked in the UK for 10 years and has decided to go back to his home country (EU). He is 48 years old and I was wondering whether he qualifies for UK state pension? Thank you so much in advance.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Lisa, yes, he will qualify for a UK pension. If he now lives in the EU, that UK work record is also counted towards any pension accruing in his home country

  246. Holly Nordhues says:

    This is such an informative.site…Thank you. My mother born in England 1920 worked 10 years in England. She moved to Canada in 1947 and then to USA in 1949. Will she qualify for a partial pension? My next question, if she did not work a full 10 years, can she get credit for the years she worked in the USA based on agreement between UK and USA to qualify for partial pension? She was also married and divorced when she lived in England to an England citizen, but she remarried a Canadian in 1947. Not sure if that matters since she was younger than 60 when she remarried. Thank you for your help!

    • David Morris says:

      hello Holly. Complicated question. Your mother is likely eligible for a partial UK pension based on her work record there. If she does not qualify, it is possible to use US work credits to enable her to qualify. It is also possible to use UK work credits to qualify for a US Social security payment. I can’t tell you which is more financially advantageous. The first step would be to apply for the UK pension

  247. Deirdre Hanssen says:

    My father was born in Belgium in 1921 to a Belgian father and English mother. He was raised in London and worked there as a child model. At 16 he had a regular job, then the Belgian Army claimed him from 1941-1945. After the war, he returned to London and worked until he and my mother emigrated to the United States in 1949. They returned to England in the 1980s and he worked in England again. Then he retired, but apparently never thought about filing for an English pension. My parents returned to the U.S. in 2010 and my father died 4 months ago. Is there some way my mother would be entitled to a pension from the U.K., although she never worked in England (or America)? Thank you for any information you can give me.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Deirdre,
      If your father worked for more than 11 years in total in the UK, then he would be entitled to a British pension. His spouse (your mother) would have been entitled to a spousal pension based on his contributions. So yes, your mother should be entitled to a pension, and it should be backdated to when she reached retirement age.

  248. Joe Raththi says:

    Hi, I am not a UK citizen, but worked in UK for over 10 years. I am getting the UK & Canadian pension in Canada now. Is my wife entitled to UK Widow’s Pension & Bereavement allowance? We are Canadian citizens.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Joe, providing your wife reached retirement age before April 2016, then she is entitled to spousal pension. It does not come automatically. It has to be applied for.

  249. Hi i like to my mom lived in london england for many years and moved to canada in 1966 is she entitled for london and england old pension.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Cynthia, I can’t answer your question without knowing your mothers date of birth, and how many years she worked in the UK

  250. MOIRA JONES says:

    Good afternoon – please advise me on my eligibility for a UK pension.
    I was born in 1938 in Manchester, UK. After WW11 my father, who had picked up various diseases and lost half a lung in North Africa, was advised to return to South Africa where he had been hospitalised before returning home to the UK. We then came to South Africa in 1948 where I was educated and employed.
    In 2001 I returned to the UK to take up employment as a Carer through agencies but Taxed as Self-Employed.
    Until 2011 I worked in the UK for three months at a time and once or twice a year until 2014.
    I was taxed and paid, by HMRC – I have a Tax Reference number – also a National Insurance Number but not contributed (I assume due to the fact I only started employment in the UK at age 61 years).
    I look forward to your response. Many thanks.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Moira, unfortunately you do not qualify. You are of the group that needs 11 years of NI contributions to qualify for a partial pension. It is now also too late to buy back any years.

  251. My wife and I live in Canada and it appears I may be eligible for a Class B pension when I turn 65 in February 2016. Can you advise if this is correct?

    My wife was born in Sept 1949, worked in the UK for 30 years (plus 5 top up years) and has been getting her UK pension in Canada since she turned 60 in September 1949.

    I’ve never worked in Britain, was born in February 1951.

    Thank you.

    • David Morris says:

      Hi Don, unfortunately you just missed out on qualifying for a Class B pension. For a man to get a spousal pension (Class B), his wife had to have been born on or after April 6 1950. That is when the rules changed to allow men to qualify for a spousal pension. Women have always been eligible, but men only became eligible if their spouse was born after that date.

  252. John Carroll says:

    Hello David,

    Great site, and most helpful. Reading through the posts, I believe, I may be entitled to a partial pension from the UK. Born September, 1950 and worked there for some 7 1/2 years. Problem is, I’ve lost my National Insurance Number. I would be able to supply the two main employers I had there. Would this be a problem?

    Thanks for any and all help,

    John

    • David Morris says:

      hello John, yes, you are entitled to a partial pension, and also still have time to increase it by making voluntary payments.
      No problem with the National Insurance number. If you can provide your last address, and employer, the Govt will have it on file.

  253. Eileen Robertson says:

    I was born in Edinburgh 1943 – moved to Canada in 1969. I did eventually become a Canadian Citizen. I worked for 11 years in Edinburgh and do receive a small pension. I am now retired and have been seriously thinking of moving back home. What benefits would I receive upon relocating back home? I look forward to your comments.
    Thank you,
    Eileen Robertson

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Eileen, I can’t be of much help to you, I’m afraid. I have been away too long, and am not familiar with the various benefits available in the UK. You can certainly contact one of the Government service centres in the UK to find out what is available.

  254. Anne Ramsay says:

    Hi,
    I was born in Scotland in 1954 and worked from 1969/70 (not sure of exact date) until move to Australia in 1979.
    Am I eligible for any part pension?
    thank you

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Anne, you come under the new rules, and will need 10 years of employment. You are probably very close to that now, but the good news is that you still have time to make any catch up payments you may need, and to make some additional voluntary payments to increase the pension. So yes, you can certainly be eligible for a partial pension

  255. Nashrudeen Hack says:

    Hello David: Many thanks, any information on the costs involved to get the pension payed directly into a Canadian bank account or how to reduce the cost for such transaction or if there is a preferred Canadian bank with low fees for pension transactions

    Thanks again,
    Nash

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Nashrudeen, there aren’t really any fees for the transfer. It is done electronically, and the Canadian amount simply gets deposited to your account. There is a currency conversion from Sterling, and there is a charge for that, but all bannks would be basically the same

  256. helen welsh says:

    Hi David
    Born July 1951 worked from age 15 to 19 got married stayed home looking after 3 children
    went back to work for about 3 yrs then emigrated to Australia in 1981
    Just turned 63 am I entitled to uk pension.
    Thanks

  257. helen welsh says:

    Hi David
    born july 1951 worked from age 15 to 19 then married stayed home
    with 3 children went back to work for about 3 yrs then moved to Australia
    1981 just turned 63 am I entitled to uk pension thanks

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Helen, yes you are entitled to a partial pension. You can also still buy back a few years to increase it. The good news is that it will be retroactive to 2012, which you can take as a lump sum, or an increased weekly payment. You can also get pension credit for the years you stayed at home with the children

      • Eileen Jackson says:

        HI David
        A similar question to Helen’s.
        Born March 1954, worked from 1970 to 1974, then 1976 to 1984 and again for a few months of 1987. Emigrated to South Africa, where I lived for 29 years.
        Do I qualify? I still have my NHS number.
        Thanks
        Eileen

        • David Morris says:

          Hello Eileen, you will need ten years of work (or voluntary contributions) to qualify for a partial pension at your retirement date of 2019. Looks like you have that already. You also can make voluntary contributions until you reach retirement age, and you can buy back at least 6 years, so yes – you qualify for a British pension.
          if you join us, we can help you get started

          • Eileen Jackson says:

            Thanks so much for the response. What sort of amount per month/annum are we looking at to buy back the 6 years, and what would the difference be if you gauged it on todays pension payable?

          • Eileen Jackson says:

            Thanks so much for the response. What sort of amount per month/annum are we looking at to buy back the 6 years, and what would the difference be if you gauged it on todays pension payable?
            Eileen

          • David Morris says:

            Hello Eileen, to buy back 1 year it will cost a one time payment of either £143, or £722, depending on whether you qualify for Class 2 or Class 3 voluntary payments. As a member, we can advise you on what is needed to qualify for Class 2, which is very financially advantageous. The type of voluntary payment you can make does not affect how much you get in pension payment.
            That 1 time payment to buy an additional year of pension eligibility, will get you an extra £196 every year at todays rates, in pension payments.

  258. Nashrudeen Hack says:

    I am not a member as yet but do plan to join. In the interim I wonder how does payment of the UK State pension take place. Do you require a UK based bank account or can you get the pension paid into a Canadian bank.

    Thank you,
    Nash

  259. Jeffrey Johnson says:

    Sorry, 2nd paragraph of my comment should have read:

    Hello. I was born in the UK on 08-04-1958 and worked there from July 1974 to March 1986 with a few short breaks. In April 1986 I moved to Spain, where I worked continuously from July 1989 to March 2005, when I became self-employed (autónomo). I therefore qualify for a Spanish pension.

  260. Jeffrey Johnson says:

    Hello. I was born in the UK on 08-04-1958 and worked there from July 1974 to March 1986 with a few short breaks. In April 1986, where I worked continuously from July 1989 to March 2005, when I became self-employed.

    I’ve just received a pension forecast from the UK: I have 12 qualifying years, which entitles me to a part pension. I also have the option to top up my UK pension with class 2 contributions. I am not sure yet how many years I can top up but in any case, it looks like this is something worth doing.

    - Should I start topping up immediately or wait until the beginning of the next UK tax year?
    - My wife is a Spanish national (we got married in 1987). Am i right in thinking she no longer has the right to a UK widow’s pension if I die before her?

    I am about to fill in and send off the form at the end of the NI38 brochure, any comments would be very welcome.

    Kind regards, Jeff, Spain

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Jeffrey, if you can top up with Class 2, that is a great deal and worth doing. You have several years grace period to make a voluntary contribution, so you don’t have to make it in the year that it applies. It doesn’t really matter either way. However, if you have the opportunity to buy back any years, you should check to make sure they don’t expire.
      You are correct in your assumption about your spouse not being eligible.

  261. Hello,

    Love your site, lots of great information.

    I am thinking of joining CABP. Do you still supply your members with the information package detailing what they need to do to apply and follow to completion the process of claiming their British pension?

    Thanks, Alex

    • David Morris says:

      Hi Alex, absolutely, we provide a complete package of information on everything to do with claiming your pension, making voluntary contributions, etc.
      We also keep that up date with the changing rules, and make sure are members are fully informed.
      And of course, we will be fighting on your behalf to get your pension indexed to inflation

  262. I was born in 1964 and lived in England with my ex-husband from May 1982 -May 1988 and had worked for 2-3 years in that time.
    My ex-husband (unfortunately now deceased) was born in 1956 and worked from the time he was 15 until 1988, sometimes self-employed.
    It seems that I would not be entitled to any kind of part pension even though I do have an NI number however I am wondering if our children (both grown) would be at all entitled to what I am guessing would have become his pension. He had also become somewhat disabled in the last couple of years. He didn’t remarry or live with anybody since we divorced. I wonder if you could advise me on either of these situations. Thank you.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Andrea, his children would not be entitled to any pension. However, you do have the opportunity to make voluntary contributions which could earn you a pension in your own right. You don’t reach pension age until 2031, and if you made voluntary contributions between now and then, you would get a British pension

      • Thank you David, are you able to advise who I contact (from Canada) to get this underway? Another thing I was hoping you might know about or who I should contact to find out whether there would be any assistance available to remove Martyn’s ashes to England to be buried in his family plot. My children and I just don’t have the money to do this and we know this is where he would want to go.

      • Also, with respect to my ex-husband, I don’t know if I mentioned that he was born in England and was still a British citizen (Canadian Immigrant) if this makes any difference to beneficiaries of a pension.

        • David Morris says:

          hello Andrea, unfortunately no. Pensions are not transferable to children, and there is no residual value in the estate. Citizenship has no bearing on pension eligibility, just a work record in the UK

  263. Bob Traynor says:

    Dear Mr Morris,
    I am of pensionable age (DOB 15/10 / 1946) born in Dundee Scotland of Scottish parents and I currently have a British passport.
    I left Scotland in January 1983 and have lived in South Africa since that date.
    Am I eligable for a UK pension or part thereof as I was employed and paid the national insurance stamp from
    +/- 1966 to Novenber 1982
    Kind regards
    Bob Traynor

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Bob, you most certainly are entitled to a British pension. You only needed 1 year, and it looks like you have around 16. You may even be able to buy back a couple more years. You need 30 years for the maximum pension, and it is prorated based on the number of years you do have. If you have 16, then you would get 16/30ths of the full pension. Your reached pension age in 2011, so you can either receive a lump sum payment back to then, or instead, take a larger weekly pension amount.
      If you join us, we can help you get started

  264. Hello,

    I am female and was born in UK and worked full-time for four years from 1981-1985 then I moved to the US where I have had my domicile and worked ever since. I will be eligible for US social security payments at the age of 67. I have a UK national insurance number. Can you advise me on collecting a UK pension and if it would be worth my time making the so-called voluntary contributions. Also by collecting a UK pension how will that affect, if at all, my US social security and/or taxes?

    thank you.

    • David Morris says:

      hello VJ, I need your date of birth to be able to answer this. The rules vary, based on your age.

  265. Neil Robinson says:

    Dear David,
    I worked in the UK from age 16 in 1966, until 1991 giving me some 24 qualifying years. I then moved to Menorca in 2002 with occasional but regular visits to the UK. I then moved to Zambia with my family and lived there from about 2005 until we moved to Canada in 2008. I have not worked or paid any NI in any of these countries apart from the UK.
    I recently tried to advise the UK pension authorities of our address here in Canada , in return for which the UK gov. Authorities required me to furnish them with full details and exact dates of my living in Spain and full details of any visits to the UK, which is rather impossible as I have not kept any records, who would? We owned a house in the UK during most of this time.
    Which we sold when we moved to Canada in 2008.
    Added to this, the UK gov. Case worker dept. do not seem happy to update my address until I am three months away from Pension age. I have asked them how will they know where to send a pension application form to but they seem to avoid this question.
    I have tried to unravel the reason that they are so interested in dates spent in Spain but to no avail. My question is does this have any bearing on the state pension that I am entitled to ?
    Thanks so much for any valued advice. My pension is not due until March 2015, but every penny counts these days and I am trying to avoid the labyrinth that the authorities seem to want to build.
    Neil Robinson

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Neil, with regard to the questions on Spain, it could be that you are legible for a partial Spanish pension.
      Due to the complex agreement between Euro countries, if a person is entitled to pensions from more than one Euro country, the country paying the final pension has to take into account any eligibility from all other European countries, and include that in the pension amount.
      If so, this should be in your favour, as time spent is Spain will count towards your british pension.

      In terms of them not wanting your current address, I cant imagine why that would be the case. I would keep at them.

  266. Hello

    I wonder of you can help me please.

    I resided and worked in the UK between July 2001 and December 2009. I have an NI number and contributed to NI during all this time. I also became a British citizen during this time (originally, South African).

    I have been back in South Africa since January 2010 and have not been contributing to NI during this time.

    I just turned 41, dob July 1973.

    A few questions:
    - Can I back-pay NI from January 2010 to date to ‘catch up’ an avoid years lost that may contribute to a UK pension?
    - If the above is doable and I continue to make contributions up until age 65, will I qualify for a FULL UK pension?
    - Will I be able to draw my pension even if I do not reside in the UK?
    - Anything else that you can think of that I need to know?

    Thank you.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Yoyo, in answer to your questions.
      1. Yes, you can back pay to Jan 2010
      2. You will need 35 years of contributions to qualify for a full pension. According to my math, you should be able to reach that if you make all your contributions
      3. Yes, you can have your pension paid anywhere in the world. Bear in mind that if you live in South Africa, or other commonwealth countries, you won’t ever receive a cost of living increase to that pension. That’s why we exist. To fight to get that injustice removed

      You should join us. We can help with information and support, and are fighting for your right to have your pension indexed to inflation

      • Thanks so much David. Much appreciate the info and prompt response.

        • David, just a last question. Will my spouse, a South African citizen, be eligible for a part-British pension? What will the percentage be and will it be for the extent of his life? Thank you again. Yoyo

          • David Morris says:

            Hi Yoyo, no your spouse will not be eligible for any pension. After 2016, no spousal pensions will be allowed for new pensioners

  267. Peter Chambers says:

    Hi David,

    Even though I live in the USA, I just joined CABP, and I’m trying to learn as much as possible. As a UK-born male (born Jan 1958) with some years of work in the UK, I will qualify for a UK pension under the new rules. A couple of questions:

    * My USA-born wife (born Feb 1956) won’t qualify for a pension under the new rules (she’s never worked in the UK), but, will she qualify for a widow’s pension if I die before her–or does my pension just vanish?

    * When I take my UK pension, do you know if my USA social security would be affected? I know that the USA system is very different to Canada’s, just wondering if you know about pensions in the USA.

    Thanks very much!

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Peter, unfortunately your pension just disappears when you die. Your spouse is not entitled to a widows pension any more.
      On the matter of the US social security system, I’m afraid I can’t help there. I don’t know much about their rules. Sorry

      Thanks for joining us

      • Peter Chambers says:

        Thanks for the answers David, much appreciated! One more question…in the most recent JUSTICE, there is this item:

        • Can I make voluntary contributions? Individuals who qualify for the single-tier pension will be able to make voluntary
        contributions as at present. However a reduced rate for these contributions and extended payment dates will apply as specified in the table shown on page 11 of the last issue of JUSTICE (Issue #2, 2014).

        However since I just joined I don’t have the last issue of JUSTICE! Would you be so kind as to include the table, please?? Thanks so much!

        Peter

  268. My father passed away 5 years ago and was just about to look up his pension entitlements, he worked in England from 1955 until 1969/70 then came home to Dublin. I was wondering how i would go about finding out if there was anything left to claim. I have no national id number for him. But can get his old address he lived at whilst living in london.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Darren, it is a little complicated. Normally a state pension does not form part of your estate, so there is no residual value. However, your spouse or common law partner would be entitled to a pension based on your NI contributions. So, your fathers spouse could well be entitled to a basic state pension.
      There is also a provision that if your father had deferred claiming his pension past retirement age, the extra pension he would have obtained by that deferral would form part of his state, and his next of kin would be entitled to a portion of that.
      You should contact the Dept of Works and Pensions on this.

  269. Pat Kidson says:

    I am a British citizen resident in South Africa. I was born May 1951 and turned 63 this year. I worked part time from age 15 holidays and week ends and full time from August 1969 to October 1970 and again from March 1971 to June 1970. Would I be entitled to any form of reduced pension. Thank you.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Pat. I need to know if you are male or female, as it can make a difference. sorry I can’t tell from the name

  270. Hi there, my dad recently passed away and he was born in the uk in 1949 he started work at 15 and emigrated to Australia in 1979 and was a full time worker. , I’m helping my mum out with hers and my deceased fathers uk pensions can you please point me in the right direction xxx where do I start? Thanks do much x

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Sian, your father would have been entitled to a partial pension. Depending on your mothers age, she may or may mot be entitled to a spousal pension, based on his NI record.
      Essentially, she needs to contact the Dept. of Works and Pensions in the UK. She will need her husbands NI number. If You don’t know the number, you can give them his last address or employer in the UK.
      If you join us, we can give you a package of information, including contact information, and how to go about claiming any pension due.

  271. I am trying to gather info for an American friend. (I know you won’t believe that but it it is true!) She is married to a Brit but left him 20 years ago because he was too lazy to work. They never divorced. He is over 80 now and GB is taking care of him. She is retiring from an American firm and has been told he will get 1/2 of her pension. Is she entitled to half of what he is now collecting? Only seems fair.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Nancy, I believe you. Providing your friend has not entered into a new common law relationship, she would normally be entitled to a spousal pension equal to about 60% of her former husbands. This would be in addition to what her husband is currently receiving.
      In terms of any entitlement to a percentage of her husbands pension, I can’t answer that.
      I would guess that if her husband is entitled to 50% of her company pension, then she would be entitled to 50% of his state pension. This is really a question of family law in the state she resides in.

    • Robert Smith says:

      I wonder if you can help – does time spent in child care mean the time a woman spend looking after her babies?

      My aunt was born in UK in 1918 – worked from age 14 until she left UK at age 27. Some of the intervening years were spent working, some looking after her two children and four years in the WAAF (Womans air force). She has never claimed a UK pension.

      Thanks

      robert

      • David Morris says:

        Hello Robert, yes it does. She would get credit for her time in the WAAF, and for time spent raising children

  272. Derrick says:

    Hi David,

    You’ve probably commented on this before but I’m sure the irony of the significant increase in the UK basic state pension that takes effect in 2016 is not lost on CABP and others fighting to get their pensions indexed. How have they been able to afford the projected increase or is it more a case of ‘give with one hand and take something else away with the other’? My skepticism makes me think that the free bus tokens might be withdrawn!

    For those of us subject to the post 2016 rules will a spouse still get a pension even if they did not contribute? If so does the payback get closer to 2 years than 3-4 years?

    Finally, my understanding is that with 30 years of contributions the ‘new’ pension would be the greater of 30/35ths of 148 GBP (the projected minimum for a full April 2016 pension) = 127 GBP or the current maximum of $113?

    For those currently collecting a UK pension here in Canada I’ve been happy to see the exchange rate finally change in their favour.

    Thanks for all the great work and effort on our behalf.
    Derrick

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Derrick,
      The increased state pension in 2016 is indeed revenue neutral to the Government. They have done this by eliminating the various other pensions that individuals were receiving, such as the second State pension, and spousal pensions.
      This actually can benefit pensioners abroad in that they may not have had any pension accrual under those schemes, and you can not make voluntary contributions to them. They will receive a larger basic state pension.

      Post 2016, a spouse will not qualify for a pension. They must qualify in their own right, with their own contributions.

      You are correct in your understanding of the calculation for 30 years.

      Thank you for your support

  273. Hello David,
    I’m a British Citizen and lived in the UK the majority of my life (born 1979). I left in 2007 at age 26 to work in China, and have now been living/working in Canada since 2010, I’m now 35.
    I worked various part time and full time jobs from age 16-23 while studying and then continuous full time for 3 yrs post graduation.
    I have not made contributions in the UK since leaving in 07.
    Could you please help to explain my options regarding qualifying for a full or part UK pension? Also what, if any would be the benefit to this rather than concentrating my money on the Canadian pension system ie. TFSA and RRSP? If Canada were to be my home in retirement.
    If I wanted to make voluntary contributions, how would I go about this?
    Any guidance would be much appreciated!

    Thank you

    • David Morris says:

      hello Daniel, lots of good questions. You will need 10 years of NI contributions to qualify for a partial pension. You may already be close to that, depending on the number of years you got credit for part time work. However, at age 35, you have lots of time to make voluntary contributions, and could end up with a full pension if you wished.
      While there is nothing wrong with TFSA’s and RRSP’s, there are two reasons why you should consider making voluntary contributions to the UK state pension
      1. You should at least contribute to get to the minimum level of 10 years. Otherwise the contributions you made while you were there will be lost.
      2. Financially, making a voluntary contribution to the UK pension is the best deal in town. Using todays numbers, for example. If you are eligible to make a Class 2 contribution, it would cost you £143 to buy 1 extra year of pension. That one extra year of pension would pay you £196 a year for life. That is a 137% return on your money in the first year alone. No TFSA or RRSP investments can match that. Even if you have to pay the Class 3 contribution rate which is £722, the payback period on your contribution is 3.6 years, which equals a 28% annual return on your money. That’s just to get the value of your contribution back. Every year after that is 100% profit.

      The easiest way to go about it is to join us. We will give you a complete package of information on how to get started, including advice on how to qualify for the Class 2 contributions.

  274. Deborah Lawrence says:

    Hi David, I guess you can say my situation is unique. I was born in the UK in 1962 and moved to the Caribbean at a very young age. I returned to the UK for college and worked with the Inland Revenue for approximately 10 months before leaving for the Caribbean permanently. I also claimed unemployment benefits in the UK for a short time before I was employed. I was offered some temporary benefit (from the Civil Service) – which I did not claim – after I resigned. Since I know that I will not be able to receive any substantial benefits here when I retire, would I be eligible to make any voluntary payments to the UK pension, how much should I contribute and how much can I expect to receive when the time comes. I currently live in the Caribbean. Thanks for your help.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Deborah, to make voluntary payments from abroad, you need to have lived in the UK for a period of 3 continuous years, plus have a National Insurance number. Given that you worked there, you would have a NI number. The question is whether you lived there at any time for a 3 year period.
      If you did, then, yes, you can make voluntary payments to qualify for a state pension. You reach state pension age in 2029, so you have time to make a number of payments.

  275. Daniel McIntosh says:

    I worked in Scotland from 1968- 1973 I emigrated to Canada in 1973 and continue to live there. I will be 65 0n February 2007, do I qualify for any kind of pension. If I have to pay to catch up the years how do I do that?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Daniel, I need to confirm your date of birth. You said “you will be 65 in 2007″ Did you mean you WERE 65 in 2007, or that you will be 65 in 2017 ?

  276. David Hughes says:

    I was born in Glasgow Scotland in October 1947. I worked in Scotland from 1963 to 1967 then emigrated to Australia. My question is, do I qualify for a part pension?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello David, yes you do. You only needed 1 year of employment. You also can still buy back likely 4 years. The good news is that it will be backdated to October 2012, which you can take as a lump sum, or an increased weekly pension

  277. Linda Russell says:

    Dear David Morris

    I was born in England 11th March 1960 and started working aged 16 (1976) and have either worked for other companies or my husband’s limited company (and bought up 3 children) until my divorce in 2007.

    I have a FULL NI paying record from 1976 – 2010 EXCEPT one really irritating gap in 1990-1991 when I was seriously ill with an ectopic pregnancy so couldnt work!!!! Would you believe they didnt even give me maternity pay then (son born August 1990) because of the gap in 1990 when I couldnt work – it made me so angry and my NI record says it is “TOO LATE TO PAY” on my record – is this really correct? Otherwise I would have a FULL 34 years!!!!

    Since 2010 to 2014 I have not paid NI contributions (self employed) because I had not earnt enough – as I was on WTC and studying for my Degree which was completed in August 2011. I therefore OWE 4 years NI but am unable to get them to realise that I had filled out the Low Income forms for years 2010 – 2013 which they have mislaid/never received (?) I WANT to pay my NI for this year as I am (finally) going to be earning enough to do so – having set up my own practice! The trouble is they will apply it to the previous years (2010 -2013) rather than to 2014 – WHAT on earth can I do about this?????? Please help!

    Linda

    • David Morris says:

      Hi Linda, from your comments, it looks like you are living in the UK – is that correct ?
      If so, I cant really help you. Our organization is for Uk pensioners living in Canada, whose pensions are frozen. I suggest you contact the DWP to resolve your questions.

  278. maurice kirwan says:

    hi I worked in uk for 4 years I have 17 years to date 2014 paid into my national insurance contributions I wan born in 1951 so my pension is on 2016 so I don’t have all the years paid can I pay back to get full pension thank you

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Maurice, you can not buy back all missing years. You can only buy back the years that they advise you are available. Were you informed about the years that you could buy back ?

      • maurice kirwan says:

        hi I checked I have 19 years up to 5 April 2012 so my retirement is on Dec 2016 by then I will have 23 years paid in to the pension how much you think I will get thank you maurice

        • David Morris says:

          Hello Maurice, if you will have 23 years by December 2016, as a minimum you will have 23/35ths of a full pension. The full pension in 2016 is estimated to be £155 a week, so you would get roughly £102 a week. You may be able to get a one time opportunity to buy back another 6 years, assuming the Government doesn’t withdraw that by then. That would add another £26 a week

  279. jacqui budd says:

    i was born in england 1957 and worked between 1974-1995 emigrating to Canada in 1996. Around 1986 or thereabouts i contracted out of SERPS and therefore had my pension paid into a private pension fund through Prudential. As i no longer resided in the UK i was not able to contribute further to the fund. Please advise what i am eligible for now in regards to a state pension over and above my private contribution?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Jacqui, you are eligible for a partial UK state pension. You need 10 years, and you have at least 20. You are also able to make catch up payments to get additional years, and you can continue to make voluntary contributions until you reach state pension age in 2023. That should get you close to a full pension, over and above any private pension.

      • jacqui budd says:

        thanks for your advice much appreciated. how do i go about making regular contributions and also do you know what kind of payments a full pension would pay out monthly? is it based on how much money i contribute and does the money i contributed into my private pension with Pru when i contracted out of SERPS count towards that? who can i contact to get further information? sorry… so many questions!

        • David Morris says:

          Hello Jacqui, I don’t know what the full pension amount will be in 2023, but to give you an idea, in 2016, the full state pension is estimated to be about £155 a week, which is roughly $283 a week. You get that if you have 35 years of contributions. If you have less than 35 years, the full pension is simply prorated based on the number of eligible years you do have. EG, if you have 30 years, you would get 30/35th of the full pension. The state pension is independent of any other pension you may be entitled to, and is based solely on the number of eligible years where you made National Insurance contributions. Those contributions would normally be made through your employer, but you can also make voluntary contributions yourself.
          The easiest next step is to join us. We will give you a full package of information on what to do next, including how to make voluntary contributions.

  280. Moira Maser says:

    I was born in England Dec8th 1956 then emigrated to canada May 1978, I worked from age 15 till I left the country I was wondering if i eligible for a pension?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Moira, it looks like you have about 7 years of contributions, and you need 10 to qualify. The good news is that you are still able to make back payments to catch up some years, and you can make voluntary contributions going forward until you reach pension age in 2022. So yes, you can become eligible for a UK state pension by making a few payments. This is a really good financial deal.

  281. My husband is British but left England after graduating and has lived in Hong Kong since. We don’t think he has made any pension contributions so far but is it possible for him to start making voluntary contributions now? He was born in 1963.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Ester, he would have to have a National Insurance number. He should have got one when he was 16 automatically. If he obtains his NI number, then he can make voluntary contributions now. We can help with how to get your National Insurance number, if you would consider joining us.

  282. I was born in 1942. Started ‘working’ as an apprentice at minimum wage at 16 then went into ‘regular’ employment at 19. Left England and the job at 33 (1975). Would I be qualified for any UK pension. How do I apply? Thanks.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Peter, yes, you are entitled to a UK pension. You are in the age group that needed 11 years of work contributions, and it looks like you would have almost 20. That’s pretty close to 50% of a full pension. The really good news is that the pension would be backdated to 2007, which is when you reached 65. You can either take that as a lump sum, or as an increased weekly amount.
      The easiest next step is to join us. We will send you a package of information on what to do next, and we are always available to help with questions.
      You can join online on this website, or simply call our office at 1 888 591 3964 (Toll free)

  283. Hi, I was born 21 april 61.
    Two question:
    1) I worked in London about 8 year,between 2002 and 2012. I would like to know if I am eligible for any pension.
    2) In the case I am eligible. For some months, I was receiving a jobseeker’s allowance, would it affect the pension?
    Many thanks

    • David Morris says:

      hello Ana, you don’t reach state pension age until 2028. At that time, you will need 10 years of work contributions to qualify for a minimum pension. You have 8 already. The good news is that you are eligible to make voluntary payments right up to 2028. You can also buy back up to 6 years if you wish. That could get you 28 years of credit, which is a pretty substantial percentage of a full pension.
      You don’t have to make all those contributions, but you need to make a couple to get you at least to 10 years.
      The jobseekers allowance wont affect your eligibility, but you do need to get to 10 years

  284. Mike Hayward says:

    Hi,
    I was born in 1960 in the UK. I live in Australia but worked full time in the UK between 1993 to 1999 where I paid tax and I’m assuming national insurance. What sort of UK pension if any would I be eligible for please?

    • David Morris says:

      hello Mike, you will reach UK state pension age in 2026. You will need 10 years of NI contributions to qualify for a partial pension, and you likely have at least 6 years already. The good news is that you are able to make catch up payments (at least 6 years), and you can also make voluntary payments going forward to retirement. Assuming you make those payments (and it is a very good financial deal to do that), you could have 24 years, or so, of entitlement. You need 35 for a full pension, so 24 years would get you a partial pension of 24/35ths of the full amount. I don’t know what the full pension in 2026 will be, but to give you an idea, in 2016 the full pension is estimated to be £145 a week. 24/35ths of that is roughly £100 a week. If you join us, we can give you a package of information, including how to make voluntary payments, and how to get a pension forecast

  285. jmramsahye007@yahoo.com says:

    Dear Sir / Madam,

    I am a British citizen, having lived and worked in uk since June 1971 until 1999 and stopped working due to ill health,
    I get a small NHS PENSION. As I will be 65 in 2 weeks time , I wonder if you could tell me if I qualify for State Pension
    as I have worked and paid my NI contribution over the 28 years.

    Yours Faithfully,
    M. Ramsahye ( Mr )

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Mr Ramsahye, you certainly do qualify for a UK state pension. In fact, you are pretty close to qualifying for a full pension of £113 a week. You only need 30 years for a full pension, and you have the ability to buy back the two years that you need to get a full pension. If you join us, we can help you get started on claiming that pension

      • Helena Taibo says:

        Hello David,

        How can I get intouch with you,
        I am british living in spain born 1953 worked for 29 and a half years in England. Would like to get my full pension benefits. Stoped working since 2006, how do I go about it.

        Thank you for all your help.

        helen

        • David Morris says:

          Hello Helena, based on your age, you don’t reach pension age until 2017. At that time, you will qualify for a UK pension. As you live in Spain, you come under the rules for pension harmonization in EU countries. The pension will likely be paid by Spain, based on all your work contributions and residence in the EU, including the UK. The rules are complicated, and we can’t really help you. Our organization is set up to support pensioners living in countries where their UK pension is frozen. The EU is not included in that, so we do not have any expertise in how EU pensions are paid. You need to take this up with the pension department in Spain.

  286. Chantal H says:

    Hi.
    My in-laws (Father is 63, Mother is 68) have british passports but have never lived in England. They are thinking of moving in a year or two. Because of their age I doubt they’ll be able to work. Will they be able to get a pension etc?
    Many thanks,
    Chantal

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Chantal, the basic UK state pension is contributory. You have to have worked in the UK for some period of time, so your in-laws would not qualify for that. There are other programs and services they may be eligible for as residents, but I am not qualified to speak on this, and my information would be out of date anyway. They would still be entitled to receive any Canadian pension they qualified for.

  287. Michelle L says:

    I lived in the UK 2 days short of 3 years (arriving May 29, 2009, leaving May 27, 2012) and I was was born in 1962.

    Is there any grace period on the 3 years I had to have lived in the UK, or am I out of luck?

    Thanks

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Michelle, if you worked in the UK for that period of time, then you meet the residency test as your contributions spanned 3 tax years, which are measured from April to April. You still need 10 years to qualify, but you can make voluntary contributions to get you there.

  288. andrew f. elliot says:

    my wife and I both receive British pensions we are both in our 70′s If I die will my wife receive an increase in her pension or will I if she dies before me.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Andrew, if you die first, then your wife will get an increase in pension up to the level of yours, but it does not work the other way round. You will not get an increase if your wife dies before you.

  289. Barbara P. says:

    I was born in Canada 1955 – I went to University in Scotland, graduated in 1978 and worked 3 jobs in Scotland and England. Although I remember my employers, I can’t remember how long I worked for each – from 1978 to sometime in the 80′s – 1983 or 1984, when I returned to Canada. I still have a record of my national Insurance number, which I must have obtained in 1978.

    Would it be worthwhile for me to investigate further in regard to a potential pension from the UK pension system?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Barbara, absolutely it is worthwhile. You reach pension age in 2021, so you can make 6 years of voluntary payments, plus buy back another 6 years, plus the years you already have from working. That could get you probably 50% of a full pension. In 2016 the current estimate of a full pension is £145 a week. By 2021, that would likely be £ 170 a week. 59% of that is £85 a week, or roughly $156 a week

  290. thomas pollock says:

    my dad and mother where born in uk and i was there for over thirty years i have been ill with a illness for years and did not work much. i was in uk army for awhile and worked on and off but my health was not good . i came to live in eire im still here i get a pension non contribution pension. id like to go back to england eventhough i have a pension here . thing is i cant keep my pension if i went to england as its only a non contributed one. my dad is dead now so i want to go back to my friends and sister in england . would i be entitled to a non contributed pension , in england.gb thank you so much tommy pollock .

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Thomas, I don’t know what you mean by “non contributed pension”. I can only help with the UK state pension, which is a contributory pension. I cant help with any other social benefit programs. With your time in the army, plus any time you spent working, you may be eligible for a partial state pension, but it would depend on the number of years that you made National Insurance contributions

  291. Jeff Sinclair says:

    I was born in Ireland April 1951 started working in April 1966 ending in Oct 1971 when I moved to Canada I was wondering if I am eligible I did make contributions for the years I worked there I am also thinking which is the best way to approach this I am not retired & still working in Canada

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Jeff, did you mean that you worked in the UK, or in Ireland? If you worked in the Republic, you would not be eligible for a UK pension, but you would if you worked in the North.
      If you worked in the UK you will be eligible for a UK pension. You may have to make some voluntary contributions to get you to 10 years, but you can certainly qualify on that basis. I suggest that you look at making those voluntary contributions, and also back payments to buy additional years. It is a great financial deal.
      If you join us, we can help get you started.

  292. Eileen Gavel says:

    Hello David,

    I was born in Canada in October 1955. I worked in the UK from Sept. 1996 until June 1999. Can you tell me if I am eligible for any pension benefits? Thank you.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Eileen, you are of the age group that needs 10 years. However, you are likely able to make voluntary payments to get you there. The rules state that you must have either 3 years of contributions, or have lived in the UK for 3 years, before you are allowed to make voluntary contributions. I believe you would qualify, as you would have 3 years of contribution history. If you do make voluntary contributions, you would certainly be able to get to 10 years, to get a partial pension. You do not need to be a UK citizen, or to have been born there.

  293. Michael D says:

    Thanks for the previous information. Does the U.K count 6 months in 1968 and 6 months in 1969 as 1 or 2 years?
    Is there a deduction from U.K pensions from Canadian O.A.S or C.P.P?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Michael, qualifying years are based on earnings. For example, in 2014, if you earned more than £5,700 in a year, that year would qualify for pension purposes. In previous years, the qualifying amount would be less. If you worked for 6 months, the chances are very good that it qualifies as a year. In your case that would mean two years.
      There is no deduction from CPP or OAS, or from the UK pension.
      OAS is subject to a partial clawback if your total income from all sources exceeds a threshold. In 2013, that threshold is $79,954.

    • Sent the application for my National Insurance Number to national Revenue & Customs in Newcastle.
      Once I get my N.I # I qualify with 2 yrs.’ as my birth date is 11th Feb 1951. I also qualify to buy back 6 years.
      To qualify for the low rate, the conditions are you must work right up to the time you leave the U.K and you must have stayed in the U.K for 3 years continuously . I seem to qualify on both fronts as I live in the U.K for 15 year continuously and left the British Army on a Friday and left the U.K on the following Monday.
      Is that your reading of the facts and do I have write the folks above to ask for the low rate payback?

      • David Morris says:

        Hello Michael, your reading of the facts is correct. You absolutely have to contact them about paying Class 2. Be aware that they don’t make it easy. You may have to insist on an answer, and it may take some time. Their first response may be no, and you may have to be persistent.

  294. Barbara M. Wilcock says:

    I worked in the United Kingdom from 1972 through 1982 and would like to know how I can apply for this state pension.

    Barbara M. Wilcock
    Trenton, Ontario,
    Canada.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Barbara, it looks like you qualify, and depending on your age, you may also be able to increase the pension by making voluntary contributions. The easiest next step is to join us. We will the send you a package of information on what to do next, including how to make top up payments. We are also available to our members to help answer any questions

  295. Diana Landriault says:

    Hi David – I workd in the UK for the early part of my career and I have been informed by them that I have 10 qualifying years. When I apply for my Canadian pension at age 60 (in Oct 2015) will these years be added in to bring up my qualifying years here, which are approximately 28 years. If so, approximately how much difference will this make to the pension I have been quoted here from CPP, ie $525.00. Thanks for any help you can offer.
    Diana

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Diana, the bad news is that your contributions in the UK do not count towards CPP. The good news is that you are entitled to a UK pension, which will be on top of anything you get from CPP. You also are still able to make additional voluntary contributions towards the UK pension, which will give you a bigger pension

  296. Bev Mackenzie says:

    Hi I am 56 and going to live and work in the UK. I will have to start paying. NI but how many years can I buy back and what will the cost to me be. Thank you
    Bev Mackenzie

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Bev, I am not sure I understand the question. If you are going to work in the UK for the first time, I don’t think you can buy back any years. Buying back is offered to people to fill in gaps in their employment record from when they first started to contribute. You don’t have any gaps, because you don’t have any record.
      However, bear in mind that you can get credit in the UK for any contributions made to CPP, under the reciprocal social services agreement

  297. Catherine Honor McCormack (nee Downing) says:

    I was born in Devon on February 24th 1950. I worked from 1968- 1974 in London.
    I do not know my NI number but I do have a current British Passport. I live in Canada.
    I wonder if I am entitled to and pension from Britain.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Catherine, If you were two months older, you would only need 1 year. As it stands, you need 10. You likely only have 8 or 9, so you are close, but you should still be able to buy back a couple of years. You should be able to qualify, but you need to act now.
      We can help you with finding out your NI number, and how to buy back some years.

  298. Alex Clyde says:

    Hello,

    I was born in December 1954, and worked in the UK from the age of 15 to 23 (almost 24). Then I moved to Canada.

    How can I qualify for a partial pension, and if so, how much am I able to top up my contributions to my UK pension (how many years)?

    I would also like to find out more about spousal pension?

    Thanks, Alex

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Alex, looks like you have 8 years now. You will need 10, but you reach pension age in 2020, so you can add 6 from now to then, plus buy back at least 6. That should give you around 20, which would be almost 2/3 of a full pension. Spousal pensions are being eliminated after 2016.
      If you join us we can tell you how to get started, and how to make voluntary payments.

  299. Jenny Warrillow says:

    Hi, I am from the UK and lived there all my life til 3 years ago. I am only 29 now but started looking into whether I will be entitled to anything when I do reach pension age… I worked from the age of 18 to 27 full time, so 9 years. Then I moved to Canada and am planning on staying here permanently. If I started to make small contributions now is it likely when I reach the relevant age I will be reimbursed or is there a huge risk that the laws will change and I will lose anything I put in? Thanks

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Jenny, if you contribute to a government pension scheme, you have to assume that the government will honour the terms of that scheme. Governments may change the scheme, but that typically only applies to new people joining, not those who already contributed. It’s no different to the Canadian CPP. We assume that the government will honour its commitments.
      It is highly unlikely that you would lose any contributions you made