Eligibility for UK State Pension

To be eligible for a UK state pension, you need to have been employed or self-employed in the UK and/or have made National Insurance Contributions for a certain minimum number of years (which could include voluntary contributions or time spent in child care).

These years of National Insurance contributions are referred to as “qualifying years”. As the legislation stands today, if you have not yet reached pensionable age, then you only need 1 qualifying year to be eligible for a partial state pension. You also only need 30 qualifying years to receive the maximum pension.

A partial pension is simply prorated based on the number of qualifying years you have. For example, if you have 10 qualifying years, then you would be eligible for a pension equal to 1/3 of the full pension amount. For 2013, the full UK state pension is £5,727 per annum.

These qualifying years provide what is known as a Category A Pension. In addition, the spouse or civil partner of someone receiving a Category A pension may be entitled to receive a Category B pension, even if they have never worked in the UK, lived in the UK, or even visited the UK themselves. The Category B pension is based on a percentage of the Category A pension being received by the main pensioner, (approximately 60%).

Comments

  1. Becky Hargrove says:

    Hi David,
    My husband and I left the UK in 2002. He was born in 1967 and I was born in 1976.
    We would like to understand when we will be able to claim pensions under the new regulations coming in and what portion. Also, is it worth making voluntary contributions?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Becky, your husband will reach retirement age in 2033. You will reach it in 2043.
      Yes, it is absolutely worthwhile making voluntary contributions, especially at the class 2 rate, but even at the class 3 rate.

  2. I was born June ’52, worked in UK part-time as a student from 1966 to 1971, then full-time from 1971 to 1977 when I went on mat leave. I always paid the ‘big stamp’ for national insurance. I then emigrated to Canada July 1980. My husband was born 1950 and worked in UK from 1965 to 1980 before we emigrated. He died in Canada in 2003 and I received UK widow’s pension for 1 year. I am now due to receive UK pension in Sept. of this year at 62 years and 3 months. Do you have any idea of how much I will receive, and do I need to apply? Thanks for any help.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Jan, looks like you would have maybe 10 years from your full time employment and mat leave. You may also have some credits for your part time work, depending on how much you earned. Based on your full time credits, you would get about 1/3 of a full pension which is currently £114 a week. That would give you approx. £38 a week, which is roughly $71 a week.
      Bear in mind that you have the ability to buy back at least 6 more years. Each year you buy back gives you almost £4 a week, so 6 years would give you another £22 a week.
      Yes, you need to apply. We can help with that if you join us.

      • Hi David, thanks for the information. Would I be entitled to anything from my husband’s contributions? Also, when you say I can buy back 6 more years, how much would that cost me to do that?

        Thanks,

  3. Pamela Donahue says:

    I receive a partial UK pension after making a voluntary contribution in order to qualify. I live in the United States and wonder if my American spouse would be eligible for any pension. I was born in 1949 and my husband in 1947. Thank you for your help.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Pamela, yes your husband is eligible for a spousal pension. It doesn’t happen automatically, he has to apply

  4. Jackie Docker says:

    I am still a UK citizen, born in 1960 and started paying for my national insurance stamp in approximately 1973 when I got a school job Friday evening, Saturdays and all vacations. At 18 when I started work full time and have always contributed to NHI – I trained then worked as a Registered Nurse for the NHS. In May 1994 I came to USA and have been living and working here. I still hold a British passport, and a “green card” for USA – at moment unsure whether to apply for citizinship, would want dual if I did, but am married to an American anyway. I started work here when I arrived and have been employed ever since. Sorry to make it so long, but I want to know what I am entitled to and when and how would I go about applying for it and if I get it how do I receive it and would I have to pay taxes on it here in America. Thank you for your help, have a Blessed Day

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Jackie, you are certainly eligible for a partial UK pension when you reach retirement age, which will be in 2026. You can also increase that pension by making voluntary contributions to National Insurance to buy additional years. Any pension would be taxable in the US. It can be paid directly into a bank account in the US.
      We can help you to get started if you join us as a member

  5. Lolo Wills says:

    Hello, my husband was born in UK on 21 June, 1944 (69 years old). He worked there for 9 years and 10 months, just shy of 10 years. Would he be eligible for a partial pension and can he top it up? We are actually thinking of moving back to the UK (I am Canadian), so any additional income would help. Thank you,

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Lolo, your husband needs 11 years to qualify for a minimum pension. The good news is that he is able to buy back a few years to get him to that number. You shouldn’t delay with moving on this, as he will lose the ability to buy back as time goes on.

  6. Eddie Davies says:

    I am retired with a full state pension and I also get a pension from Holland where I worked for 9 years.My wife worked for a number of years in Holland but has not worked since coming to the Uk in 1988. I believe that part of my Dutch pension is based on my wife’s time in Holland.The question is :- Will she be entitled to a Uk State Pension when she reaches retirement age? She is currently 62.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Eddie, yes, your wife is entitled to a spousal pension equal to roughly 60% of your pension. We can help you with how to apply for it. It must be applied for. It does not happen automatically

  7. Hello

    I am Canadian and living in Canada.

    I worked in England for 2 yrs when I was in my 20′s. In London. I had a stamp in my passport which entitled me to work there legally due to my grandparents being born in England.

    I am now almost retirement age and my enquiry is due to the fact that I would like to receive transferable pension time for this period of time I worked in England, if possible.

    Could you please advise if I would have had a social security number there, or how I go about doing this, or who I need to contact etc.

    I have no records, other than remembering a few of the names of the places i worked:

    Thanks, Dianne

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Dianne, you would need to contact the Dept of Works and Pensions to find out your national Insurance number

  8. Thomas Richardson says:

    Arrived in Canada 1952 and when I retired 21 yrs. ago from Bell Canada, I applied for B.P. and was advised I was short 2 months of the required 10 years of N.I. contributions and, therefore, did not qualify.

    I worked for the G.P.O.in Lockerbie, Scotland, from June, 1942 -1947- Royal Navy National Service 1947 – 1949 – re-employed by GPO upon Discharge in June 1949 to March 1952 when I emigrated to Canada. My date of birth May 13, 1928..

    Also my wife worked in Scotland for approx. 5 years 1946-52 – date of birth May 25, 193.

    Thank you for your comments.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Thomas, if the DWP has looked at your contribution history, and deemed that you didn’t have the requisite number of years, I’m afraid you are out of luck. Im surprised that they didn’t give you the option of buying back some years, but it is too late now.
      Unfortunately, your wife would be in the same category. Sorry.

  9. M Abdulhusein says:

    I am a UK citizen. I had worked in the UK from 1972 to 1974 when I emigrated to Canada.I am a Canadian citizen now too. I was born in July 1945, therefore I am 68 years old. Am I eligible for a partial pension from the UK.? If yes, can it be backdated from age 65 too.
    Thanks

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Mr Abdulhusein, the good news is that yes, your retirement date was July 2010, which means you fall under the rules whereby you only need 1 year of contributions to be eligible for a partial pension. You are also still able to buy back some years to increase that pension. Any pension you receive would be backdated to July 2010, either as a lump sum or as an increased weekly pension amount. You should apply without delay. We can help you with an information package, if you join us

      • Abdulhusein says:

        Yes. However the only documentary evidence is my old expired UK passport that was issued in 1974.
        Thank you.
        Please send be the info. package.
        My phone – 519 824 8039 in case you need to contact me.
        I too have your contact from this website.

        • David Morris says:

          Hello Mr Abdulhusein, you would have to write to the pensions dept to obtain your National Insurance number, which you can do by giving them your last address in the UK, or your last employer.
          We can only supply detailed help and information to our members. I would urge you to join us.

  10. I will be 65 middle of April. Worked in N Ireland from I was 18yrs to 1988. What woul I qualify for also my common law husband worked there and could have 9yrs of contributions. If he dosent qualify qualify can he still get something as I would qualify. How do I apply.
    Thank You

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Helen, you certainly are eligible for a British Pension. Your husband is not eligible for a pension based on your contributions history, but may be able to qualify on his own by buying back some years. The quickest way to proceed is for you to join us (you can join online on this website, or call our office.) We will send you out a complete package of information on how to get started. Don’t delay, as your husband may lose the ability to buy back some years

  11. Roy lappin says:

    Thank you for your prompt reply David,one more thing it’s tax time in Canada and I would like to know if the inland revenue sends out a form telling you how much you received in pension money. I am assuming I have to declare it as income in Canada.

  12. M Sutherland says:

    I would greatly appreciate knowing whether I should pursue pension benefits in the UK. I worked part time as a student from 1970- 76 , then full time in 1977-78. I will be 60 in September 2014 and wonder if it is worth my while making an application for a partial pension ..

    Any advice is much appreciated.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello, M Sutherland, based on your age, you will reach pension age after 2016, which means you fall under the new law. You will need 10 years of contributions to qualify for a partial pension. You already have some years, and you are able to make voluntary contributions to buy additional years to get you to at least the minimum, or more. In my view, this is absolutely worth doing. The value you get from making voluntary contributions is huge.

  13. Roy lappin says:

    Hi,I live in Canada and am 67yrs old and collecting a British pension,is it true my wife, who is Canadian is entitled to claim a portion of my pension as well,thanks
    Roy lappin

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Roy, it depends on her age. If she reaches retirement age before April 2016, then she will be entitled to a spousal pension

  14. Caroline Spencer says:

    Hi,

    My mum was born in the U.K. In 1947. She moved to Ireland when she was 2 1/2 years old. Is she eligible for a state pension ?

  15. Tony W-Wilson says:

    Hello, I worked in the UK between 1972-1980. I turn 65 in July 2015. Will I be entitled to a partial pension & if so is there a quick calculation I can make to determine how much per annum?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Tony, for every year that you get credit for a National Insurance contribution, you will get 1/30 of the full pension amount. Today’s full pension is £110 per week, so if you have 8 years credit you would get 8/30, or roughly £29 a week. Bear in mind that this amount will increase by the amount of annual indexing between now and then.
      You should know that you can also make back contributions to buy additional years credit.

  16. Brian Cox says:

    Hello,
    I worked in the UK from 1970-1986 and then emmigrated to Canada.I made a deliberate effort to top up the remaining NI contributions to the maximum so that I could claim the maximum pension abroad. I am now 60 and realise I cannot claim till 65.
    I looked on the UK pensions website for claimants resident in Canada and it seemed to suggest that if you qualified for Canadian Old Age Security the UK pension would be reduced or you would not qualify.
    Do you have any insight into this?

    Many Thanks

    Brian

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Brian, there is no restriction on the UK pension. It is not reduced in any way by any pension you may earn in Canada.
      What may possibly happen is that if your total income from all sources (including the UK) exceeds $71,592 the govt will start to clawback a portion of your OAS (but not CPP)
      If your total income exceeds $114,640, your OAS is effectively reduced to zero.

  17. Lala Espejo says:

    Hello, My father was a british citizen and worked in London from 2002-2013. He went back in the Philippines last Dec 2013 because he was suffering from Cancer and died after 3 months in the Philippines. Is he entitled to a pension? Or what kind of benefits to be claimed?

  18. antonio says:

    Hello, I am a Spanish citizen and I worked in England for 5 to 6 years
    contributing to national insurance, from 1975 to 1980. I am 57 now.
    Will I be entitled to a partial pension when I retire? I would like to join
    your organisation for asistance thank you.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Antonio, the rules for pension eligibility within European countries are complicated. The pension systems of all European countries are harmonized, so that work experience in one country is recognized towards the pension calculation in another country in the EU.

  19. Good day

    I am a British citizen, born in UK, living elsewhere. I have a National Insurance number as l worked there for a few months. Can l start contributing to my state pension? Was born in 1966

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Hayley, provided you lived in the UK for at least 3 years since birth, you will be able to make voluntary contributions towards a state pension.
      We can help you with how to go about doing that

  20. Hi, I moved to Canada in 2004 and I reach retirement age (under the new rules) at age 65 and 9 months in May 2020. I have 30 years of NI payments. Because I come under the new rules, will I now have to pay a further 5 years of voluntary contributions to ensure a full basic pension? Thank you in anticipation of your reply.

  21. Siobhan Wrafter says:

    Hi, I lived in Lomdon from 90-94 and paid what needed to be paid. I have lived in the US since. Just wondering is there anything I am entitled to. Should I go back and work until five years heard there is something for five years. Is there a website like we have for social security where I can key in my National insurance number and see what I have to do.

    Thank u.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Siobhan, I would need to know your date of birth to tell you what you are entitled to. Unfortunately there is no website that will let you enter your National Insurance number and give you that information.
      If you reach retirement age after April 2016, you will need 10 years, but you also have the option of making voluntary contributions to get you additional years.
      If you join us, we will give you a package of information on how to do all of that, and get started

  22. Stuart Leigh says:

    I was born in England and worked full time from 1967 to 1972 when I came to Canada. I turn 65 in March 2015. Do I qualify for any sort of pension?

    Thanks

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Stuart, based on your record, yes, you would qualify for a partial pension. You also are eligible to make “catch up” payments for a number of years, which would increase that pension.
      You should take action on this soon, so as to get the maximum number of catch up years

      • Stuart Leigh says:

        O.K. so what’s my next move?

        • David Morris says:

          Hi Stuart, the easiest thing to do is simply join us. You can join online on the website. We will send you a detailed package of info on what to do next, and how to go about making voluntary payments.
          Once you get your pension, we will also be fighting on your behalf to get it indexed to inflation.

  23. Hi David

    Currently I am 55 and will reach state retirement age in 2025 (66).

    If I deferred my state pension for 5 years, how much extra would I receive per week? I understand the basic
    pension went up to £144 per week recently?

    Also, how would I qualify for the extra state pension. I worked for 31 years and paid class 1 national insurance contributions. Since then I have paid class 2 as self employed for 5 years.

    Thanks

    Andrew

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Andrew, the rules for pension deferral have not yet been defined in the new Single Tier pension which comes into law in 2016, so I can’t answer that. The basic pension has not gone up yet, but will go up in 2016 with the new law. The estimated amount at that time is £144 a week, but that could change.
      The extra state pension is being eliminated in 2016, with the introduction of the single tier system. There are complex transition rules for people who have already built up an entitlement to the extra pension. The DWP will calculate that automatically, so you will not lose any entitlement you have built up.
      The maximum number of years you need for a full pension is 35, and the DWP recommends that you do not make voluntary contributions more than that without checking with them, as it may not give you any additional pension.

  24. Lisa Badrick says:

    Hi I am inquiring in this regard for my mother – who left the UK in 1972 at age 29 to South Africa – she worked there from age 16 – would she qualify and how does she go about investigating this? Thank you – Lisa

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Lisa, Yes, with 13 years of work credit, your mother is entitled to a British pension. As she is already past retirement age, she will be likely entitled to a lump sum payment, retroactive to her date of retirement.
      The easiest way is for you to join us. We will give you a package of info on how to go about claiming your mothers pension. You can join online on the website, using Paypal or a credit card.

  25. M McDaid says:

    Hi I worked for about 6 months in 1979 in the UK. Am I entitled to any pension and can I buy back? If so would it be better to do so before April 6th? If it is worthwhile can you sort it for me ? How do I pay to get your advice. I will be 65 on 21 July 2022.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Mairead, to be able to make back payments, you need to have lived in the UK for 3 years. If you only worked there for 6 months, but did not live there for any other time, you would not be eligible. Sorry

  26. Amanda Watson says:

    I am an NZ citizen who worked in the UK between March 1979 and March 1987. I am currently 52 years of age and from what I have read would need a frther year of contributions to meet the new threshold for partial pension payments. As I still have 13 years of work ahead of me – is there any way of find out what level of vluntary contribution I would need to make to be eligible?

    many thanks

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Amanda, The new law says you will need 10 years. Based on your work experience, it looks like you will have 8 or 9 already (depending on the months you worked). So you will only need 1 or 2 to qualify. You can make voluntary contributions, which can be either at the class 2 rate, or the class 3 rate, depending on circumstances, (which the Dept of Works and Pensions will decide). For 2013 Class 3 rates were £705 for a year, and class 2 were £140.40, so class 2 is better.
      If you join us, we can give you a package of info that tells you how to go about getting a pension forecast, and also how to make voluntary contributions

  27. Merrilee Hilts says:

    I also worked in England in 1988-1989 for about 1 1/2 after leaving school and moving to America. I’m only 42 will I be eligible for partial pension? Is there a way I can buy into it now? Thanks

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Merrilee,
      You will need 10 years of contributions to get a partial pension, but you certainly have time enough to make voluntary contributions to get you there, and you are able to do that.
      The easiest way to get started is to join us, and we will give you an information package on what to do

  28. martin hills says:

    i worked in england from leaving school at 15 in 1964 till emigrating to new zealand in late 1973.
    i am now in the the situation of appling for the pension here, and i was asked if i am entitled to a uk pension.
    this i am not sure about?. thanks martin.

  29. Hi there,Thank you for your advise. I was born 1963 and I now only qualify for a category B pension after I re-married.

    Will this effect my husbands chance of getting a pension through mine?

    We are looking into if he can buy back a year or two to increase his contributions to 11,so he can get a pension.

    I am worried what the change are, that come into effect this year ,that means he’ll lose out?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Josie, If you only qualify for a Class B pension, then your husband will not be eligible for a pension based on your record. He has to be eligible on his own. There are no changes coming this year, but he may lose out because the rules for buying back are time dated. That’s why you need to pursue that as soon as possible

  30. Hi there My husband was born in 1941 has lived, worked in UK. He was told he cannot have a state pension because he

    has not paid enough NI contributions I presume they meant a full pension. After reading this article I believe he would

    qualify, for a basic 1/3 pension? As to date he has not received any pension believing he would not qualify. If he is

    entitled to a basic pension would they back pay it to when he retired?

    He applied for the winter fuel allowance and he was informed that he did have 10 years NI contributions.

    I was born in UK and qualify for basic state pension. Would he qualify for a category B on the back of mine?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Josie, given his birth year Your husband would need a minimum of 11 years of NI contributions to qualify for a partial pension. There is a possibility that he may be able to buy back a year or two, which could put him at the minimum level if he only has 10, but you need to pursue that immediately as he will lose the opportunity this year.

      He would only qualify for a category B pension if you were born after April 6, 1950.

  31. Hi David,
    My husband and I emigrated to Canada in 1973. My birthdate is Sept 1952, his is June 1951. I have 6 qualifying pensionable years and my husband has bought back some class 2 years to a total of 20 qualifying years. Our predicament is that I will now reach pensionable age at 62.5 in March 2015 however my husband will not reach pensionable age until June 2016, 2 months after the new proposed legislation is introduced. My question is – Will I still be able to claim a class B pension through my husband or should I buy back 4 more class 2 years for myself so that I will have 10 years?
    Thank-you

    • David Morris says:

      Hi Linda, as the legislation stands today, you will still be able to claim a Class B pension, under the existing rules

  32. Hi there, My husband and I emigrated to Canada in 2007. I was born in 1973 and he in 1974 we both contributed to the state pension from age 16 until we left so 18 years for me and 17 for my husband. Do we qualify for anything? Do we have to be of certain age to claim and how do we start the process?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Jackie,
      Yes, you certainly do qualify. Both of you. You have to be at retirement age to claim. Retirement age is increasing over the next few years, so it would depend on your birthdate. For men it is either 65 or 66, for women it is between 60 and 66.
      You can continue to make voluntary contributions right up to retirement age, which will increase your pension.
      The easiest way to start is to join us. Only $25 for a family membership, and we will send you a package of information on what to do.
      We are a non profit organisation. Everybody is a volunteer. WE do this as a group to campaign to get our UK pensions indexed to inflation, and we also help people understand and claim the pension they entitled to.
      You can join online on the website

  33. Hello David,

    Could you please tell me when is my retirement date. I was born in 1954 and will be 60 years old in June 2014. I left the UK in 1991. I worked in the UK from 1971-1980. I went on maternity leave and then went back to work part time for about two years until leaving for Canada. My husband also worked in the UK for about 21 years. Could you please tell me if I am entitled to a British Pension. If I am entitled, could you please tell me the amount of pension I would receive and the options I would have regarding buying back years and making voluntary contributions and how to go about doing this. Any information is much appreciated.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Tina,
      Your retirement date is January 2020, when you will be 65 and 7 months. (The pension age is increasing for everyone). You will need a minimum of 10 years of NI contributions to qualify for a partial pension. It looks like you have that now. You can also make back contributions, and voluntary contributions up to your retirement, so yes, you are entitled to a UK pension, and you can increase it. The exact amount will depend on the number of contribution years. The maximum pension is based on having 35 years. If you have less than 35, it is simply prorated, based on the number you do have. For example, if you have 17 years (approx. half of what you need) you will get half of the full pension. If you have 12, you will get approx. 1/3 of the full pension, and so on.
      The amount of the full pension increases every year, so you will get your partial pension based on whatever the full pension is in 2020.
      To give you an idea, when the new legislation comes in in 2016, the full pension amount is estimated to be £145 a week at that time. By 2020 it will likely be around £160 per week, so if you had 17 years of contributions, you would get roughly £80 a week ($120)
      If you join us, we will give you a complete package of information, including what to do next, how to get a pension statement, and how to make voluntary contributions
      One $25 family membership in CABP will cover both you and your husband, and we will be fighting to make sure that when you do receive your pension, it will be indexed to inflation every year

  34. Oliver Claffey says:

    Hello David,
    I will be 65 this June. I worked in the UK from September 1966 until November 1969 when I emigrated to Canada.
    I am unsure if I qualify for any UK pension. Could please enlighten me?

    Thanks,

    Oliver

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Oliver,
      Yes, you are eligible for a partial UK pension. You come under the current rules where only 1 year of National Insurance contributions is required. You also are eligible to buy back a number of years to increase that pension. This is something you definitely should consider without delay.
      If you join us, we will give you a complete information package on how to get going. We will also be fighting to get your pension indexed to inflation.

  35. John Suddons says:

    Hi David,

    I just received the paperwork to claim my British pension. I have been topping up and now see that my wife could apply for a category B pension. She was born in Canada in 1948 and never worked in Britain. Would she be eligible for a pension?

    Thanks,

    John

    • David Morris says:

      Hello John, the short answer is yes. providing you both reach retirement age before 2016, then your spouse is entitled to a class b pension

  36. Hi David

    I left the UK in 1995 after working for nearly 18 years, I am not eligible for a pension until 2027. I had opted out of SERPS so thought that I wasn’t eligible for a pension but I’ve just found that I probably am eligible for a state pension. I am going to look at buying back years but wonder if I would qualify class 2 contributions. I did leave my job about a week before I flew here but I came originally on a visitor permit and then applied for landed status. What is the criteria for establishing whether you need to pay Class 2 or Class 3? Would it still be worth it if I need to pay Class 3?

    Thanks

    Bev

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Bev, the UK does not go out of its way to make it easy to pay Class 2 contributions. Generally they want you to have left the UK within about a week of stopping work, and then to have started work within a week or so in Canada. You don’t have to have been a landed immigrant, just that you started employment of some kind.
      If you have to play Class 3, it is still financially a good deal. For what it costs you to buy 1 year, you get your money back in extra pension within about 3.5 years. If you were to buy an annuity for the extra pension amount instead, it would cost you several times what it costs to buy it on your pension

  37. Hi David,

    I was born on 16/4/1953. I lived and worked in the UK from April 1986 to March 1990. I then worked again from September 1993 to September 1997. I made NI contribution during those years. I moved to Canada in January 1998.

    Could you please tell me when is my retirement date? Am I going to be entitled to UK pension? If I do, how much pension will I receive? Do I need to buy back or make voluntary contribution in order to be entitled to any pension?

    Thanks.

    Lucy

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Lucy, your retirement date is 6th July 2016. You will come under the new legislation, which has a significantly bigger basic pension amount. You will need 10 years of NI Contributions to be eligible for a minimum partial pension. To get that, you will likely need to make a couple of years of voluntary contributions. You can increase that minimum pension by buying back some years and continuing to make voluntary contributions. Given how close you are to qualifying, it is very worth while to pursue this. A minimum pension for you would be at least £2,200 a year – or roughly $3,300.

  38. Hi I worked in the UK from December 1978 to June 1979 about 6 months. I will be 60 in 2016. Am I entitled to a pension? Can I buy back years for a partial pension?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Mairead, if you have a National Insurance number from when you worked in the UK, you will be able to make voluntary contributions which will get you at least a partial pension

      • Thank you as it is so long ago I don’t think I have any documentation just the address where I worked and the dates!
        Can you tell me how I could get my National Insurance Number

  39. Hi there

    My birth date is April 1948 and I worked in the UK from 1968 to 1979 after which I got married and stopped working to raise our children. My husband also worked from 1978 to 1983, after which he had his own business until we left to immigrate to Canada in 1994. My husbands birthday is December 1946.

    Would I fall under the old rules since I turned 60 before 2010? Would my husband fall under the new rules since he turned 65 after 2010?

    Furthermore is it possible to get the British pension service to send us a cheque in pounds or is it better to give them our account information here in Canada and get the funds transferred over in Cdn dollars?

    Your help would be greatly appreciated, I’m not sure where to start.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Mandy, yes you fall under the old rules – which means you needed a minimum of 10 years, which it looks like you have. Your husband falls under the current rules, which means he only needed 1 year. Both of you are also still able to buy back some years, but you need to move soon on that. The government will not send you a cheque in pounds to Canada. They will only send it to a Bank in Canada, which converts it to Canadian dollars. If you want to receive it in pounds, you have to have an address or bank account in the UK.
      If you are not receiving your UK pension now, then I think the first thing to do is join us. It is only $25 for a family membership. We will send you a complete package of information on what to do.

      • I was born February 1949. Started work when I was 15. Worked till I left to go to Canada May 5th 1972. I turned 65 Feb 3rd 2014.will I be eligible for pension from UK. Thank you Sandra Shimmon..

        • David Morris says:

          Hello Sandra, you would have reached retirement age when you were 60, in 2009, which meant that you needed 10 years of employment contributions to be eligible. You may be very close to that with your work record, but the good news is that you can buy back some years, which would be enough to qualify for at least a partial pension.
          You have to move quickly, though, as every year that goes by, you lose the right to buy back the farthest year.
          If you join us, we can tell you how to go about doing that. It is certainly worth your while to qualify for a partial pension.

      • Hi David

        Thank-you for this information. At least it puts me in the right direction. I was under the impression that I would no longer be able to buy back some years since my husband and I have both already reached the age of 65 – myself in 2013 and my husband in 2011.

        So in terms of buying back years – would we now need to contribute enough money to the government that it would make us both eligible for the full state pension? If I’ve only got 10 years of working in UK – does this mean I have to contribute 20 years worth to get to the full 30 years?

        Regards,
        Mandy

        • David Morris says:

          Hello Mandy, no – you are only allowed to buy back a limited number of years. The rules are quite strict. In your case it will likely only be 3 or 4 – enough to qualify you for a partial pension at elast. Your husband might be able to buy back a few more than that, again – enough to qualify for a partial pension. Certainly better than nothing.

          • Thanks David. I joined your service yesterday – look forward to getting the items that you mention as a benefit of joining.

          • David Morris says:

            Hi Mandy, excellent. Thanks for your support. You should get your package of information by email this week

          • David I have another question – will the fact that I’m receiving a British State Pension have any effect on my Canadian CPP or Old Age Security payments?

          • David Morris says:

            Hi Mandy, your UK pension will have no affect whatsoever on your entitlement for either CPP or OAS.
            Receiving the UK pension will obviously add to your total income. You may be aware that if your income from all sources reaches a specified amount, the government will start to “claw back” a portion of the OAS (but not CPP). For 2014, if your net annual income from all sources is greater than $71,500, then the government will start reducing your OAS on a sliding scale until you reach the net income level of $115,000 – at which point your OAS is zero

      • Hi David

        So I wrote a letter to the international pensions department – I would have been due for a pension in April 2008 and I got a response back saying that I can claim a one-off taxable amount for everything that has accumulated since then until today’s date and I can choose to get this instead of the extra state pension I apparently earned in the period since April 6, 2005. I’m confused – what is this “extra state pension” and how would have earned it since I turned 60 in 2008 and I’ve lived in Canada for a good 20 years now. Can you explain what this extra state pension might be?

        Regards,
        Mandy

        • David Morris says:

          Hello Mandy, the April 6, 2005 date simply refers to the date when the rule changed so that people were allowed to either claim a lump sum or an increased pension amount. Prior to April 2005 they had no choice.
          In your case, your pension started in 2008, so you come under that new option. This means that you can either choose a lump sum from 2008 until today, or an increased monthly pension amount from today onwards. Just ignore the 2005 reference.

          • Fabulous you explained to me in two minutes when I spent so long trying to dechiper the confusing language of the letter that I got.

            What a wonderful service you offer here. I am so pleased to become member.

            Cheers
            Mandy

          • David Morris says:

            Hi Mandy, glad we could help. We are all volunteers here, and are non profit.
            Our members fees all go towards fighting to get our pensions indexed.
            Your support is appreciated

  40. Jason Lea says:

    Hi, I was wondering if you could shed some light on my situation. I worked in the uk at 15 years old at Mcdonald’s where I’m not sure if I would have paid NI and right after that I was in the British Army from Sept 1986 to August 1991 when I came to Canada. I am currently 44 years old as of Oct 2013. I never thought it was going to be worth following up regarding what pension I would qualify for but now (with age and experience) I have realized it may be something to look into. Any insight/advice would be appreciated. Thank you for the work you do.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Jason, you would certainly have paid NI while in the army, and possibly when you were working at McDonalds, so you have a NI record. You will need 10 years of contributions to qualify for a partial pension, but the good news is that you can make voluntary NI payments from now until you reach retirement age. This would certainly qualify you for a sizeable pension. You are wise to be looking at this now, while you have time to increase your future pension. If you join us, we can tell you how to go about doing that

  41. wayne morris says:

    Hi,
    I worked in England from 16 to 24 before moving to Canada. We have bought a house in England and will be moving back in three years time at which I shall be 61 years old.
    How many years will I need to pay and what would you recommend.

    Thanks
    Wayne Morris

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Wayne, based on your age, you will need 35 years of NI Contributions to be eligible for a full pension, and between 7 and 10 for a partial pension. Sounds like you already have 8. You have the ability to make voluntary contributions to increase your pension, both now and when you return to England. I can’t advise you whats best, as it depends on your personal circumstances, but purely from a financial return on investment, it makes sense to make voluntary contributions to increase your pension.

  42. Mike Barron says:

    Hi David i am 56 years old and emigrated to Canada in May 1982. I worked in england from 1973 to march 1982 can i claim a uk pension.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Mike,
      the short answer is yes, you will be able to qualify for a UK basic State pension. Looks like you already have 8 or 9 years of eligible contribution. You will come under the new pension bill, which will require either 7 or 10 eligible years (they haven’t decided that yet). You may want to consider making voluntary contributions to ensure that you have at least 10 years. You can make more, of course, if you want to increase your pension when you retire.
      If you join us, we will give you a package of info on how to go about finding out how many years you already have, and how to make voluntary contributions to increase those years.
      We will also be fighting on your behalf to make sure your pension is indexed to inflation

  43. Hi David,

    Thanks for your reply but I just found that web page
    http://www.dwp.gov.uk/international/benefits/state-pension/state-pension-arrangements-in-social/#canada

    It says:
    Effect of the agreement on entitlement to UK State Pension for people in the UK who have lived in Canada

    Periods when you lived in Canada may, in some circumstances, be taken into account when deciding your entitlement to UK State Pension. This will be the case if you satisfy the following three conditions:
    – you must be over the age of 65 (this applies to both men and women);
    – you must not be getting a Canadian Old Age Security Pension awarded…
    – you must satisfy a test of residence in the UK. …

    When these three conditions are satisfied, you are treated as if you had paid UK contributions for periods of residence in Canada between the age of 16 and pension age.

    This will help you to satisfy the contribution conditions for UK State Pension, or to get a higher rate of UK State Pension.

    Am I misinterpreting it?

    Regards,

    Peter

    • David Morris says:

      Peter, you appear to be absolutely correct. I have never researched it from the angle of living in the UK, and I was not aware of this. Thank you for that. There appear to be some restrictions, include a maximum prior residence in Canada, but yes, if you meet the criteria it looks like your Canadian history will give you NI Credits towards a UK pension.

  44. Hi David,

    My situation is the reverse of all the other postings. I was born and raised in Canada and now live in the U.K. I had 14 years of contributions to CPP (Canada Pension Plan) before immigrating and 15 & counting qualifying years in the U.K.

    I’m sure I read somewhere that U.K. will recognise my Canadian years as U.K. years (counting towards the 30 necessary for a full pension). Is that true?

    • David Morris says:

      Hi Peter,
      No. UK state pension is built up from contributions to the National Insurance fund. You don’t have to be a citizen, or even a resident, you just have to have made employment or voluntary contributions to the NI Fund.
      Canada will recognise your CPP contributions, and you will be entitled to a Canadian Pension when you reach retirement age. Unlike Britain, Canada will actually index your CPP pension to inflation, no matter where you live.

  45. Ann Daniel says:

    I have a british pension and returning to uk on wednesday 23 October returning 4 November,to attend my fathers funeral.
    I live in Ontario Canada, can i claim a increase in my pension while iam in the Uk for this period of time ?.

  46. Phil Hoare says:

    Hi David,
    Is there a limit on how long one can defer claiming Basic State Pension in order to increase it’s value? Would a Category B pension for my wife be based on the basic Category A pension rate at time of claim or the increased rate resulting from deferral? Am I right in thinking that the rate of increase for deferral of pension is under threat of reduction by currently proposed legislation?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Phil,
      I am not aware of any limit on deferring the pension. I have seen nothing to that effect in any of the detailed documents. The Category B pension will be based on the pension amount that is finally paid, so it would include any deferral increases. The receiver of the Category B pension can opt either for the extra amount to be paid as a lump sum, or as a weekly increase. If the rate of increase for deferral changes under the new legislation, it will not affect people who reached retirement age before April 2016. Those people can continue to defer at the rate of 1% every 5 weeks.

  47. Hello,
    My deceased husband was born, raised and worked in UK until he left for Canada at age 21. I believe he left school at 15 and started to work at that time under he left the UK. I was wondering if I would qualify for a spousal pension if at all. Recently, someone has mentioned the possibility of buying back the years needed. How do I find that out…is there an e-mail address or phone number to call. I have his UK birth certificate but that’s all.
    Many thanks
    Sally

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Sally, the only possibility you have is if your husband was entitled to a pension. At most, it sounds like he would only have 5 or 6 years of eligible contributions. If he would have been 65 prior to April 2010, then he would have needed 11 years of contributions to qualify for anything, and therefore wouldn’t be entitled. Your best bet is to contact the Dept of Works and Pensions in the UK. They will need your husbands last address in the UK, or his last employer, as they need to find out his National Insurance number

  48. Lynda Black says:

    I was born may2nd 1949 and worked5years in uk am I entitled to any state pension I now live in USA I am female

    • David Morris says:

      Hi Lynda,
      sorry, no. Based on your age, you would have needed 10 years of eligible contributions to qualify for any pension.

  49. Hi David,
    Many thanks for your quick and clear response. I now need to investigate the process for making the voluntary contributions; thought I’d avoided that by making the 30 years, but I guess that’s life.
    Kevin

  50. I am currently 51 and emmigated from the UK to Canada in 2012, having worked (including 4 years as a full time student) fairly continously since age 18. Prior to emmigating I obtained a letter from the UK Pensions Office (Newcastle) stating that I had made 30+ years contribution and I would thus be eligable for a full state pension (once I get to the applicable age) under the legislation then in force.

    I have since heard rumours that
    - the qualifying years for a full pension are increasing from 30 to 35.
    - it will not be possibe to claim both UK and a Candian state pension in the future (I will be elligible for a small Canadian pension at retirement age).

    My questions are:
    - are the qualfying years increasing to 35? And if so am I able to make voluntary contributions to get to 35 years (I believe I’ll have 30 or 31 years currently)?
    - am I able to claim both a UK and Canadian pension when the appropriate time comes (I will have contributed to both, but not sure if that makes any difference)? If not, can I choose which one I claim, as I’ll be resident in Canada, but my UK pension is likely to be larger (despite the erosion due to no indexing)?

    An additional question for the future is: I understand I can delay taking a pension when I get to the applicable age (likely to be 67 or 68). If I do this, is the pension amount based on the amount payable in the UK when I achive pension age, or when I first actually take the pension (ie is it worth delaying to lock in a few more years of indexation)?

    Thanks for your help.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Kevin,
      1. Yes, the number of years for a maximum pension is increasing to 35 after 2016, and yes, you are able to make voluntary contributions to get to that point. The pension amount you will receive is also going to be substantially bigger with the new legislation.
      2.You can absolutely claim both Canadian and UK pensions. There is nothing in UK or Canadian law that prevents that.
      3. You can certainly defer your UK pension, and the pension you will eventually receive will increase for each year you defer it. The pension is frozen only from the point you start receiving it, not from pension age. As to if it is worth it, that becomes a personal cash flow decision. Deferring it will increase the amount, but you may need the cash sooner.

  51. Hello David,
    I was born in July 1951, I started working after getting out of school in 1966. I moved to Canada in December 1974. I have my NI number, and a few years ago I made inquiries into getting an estimate forecast, they said at the time I would have to make voluntary contributions to make up to the basic pension in a certain amount of time. (I chose not to) From what I am hearing, that has changed, and I wonder if I can claim some pension from the UK when I turn 65 in 2016?
    Thanks,
    Chris

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Chris, you will reach pension age in July 2016, which means that you will be affected by the new legislation currently scheduled to come in in April 2016. Under that legislation, you will need a minimum of between 7 and 10 years of contributions to be eligible for any pension (the exact number hasn’t been decided yet). It sounds like you already have 7 or 8, based on your work record, so you are pretty close.
      You still have the opportunity to buy back some years, and to make more voluntary contributions, which would definitely qualify you. It is up to you whether you want to do that, but you are entitled to.
      If you join us, we can tall you exactly how to go about doing it, and can help you assess whether you can make contributions at the lower class 2 rate. You already have your NI number, so it will be easy to make past contributions.

  52. I am aged 66 and receive a british pension based on 19 qualifying years.
    If I had 20 years, I would be able to purchase up to 6 additional years.

    The 20 year rule seems both arbitary and unfair.

    Do you know if there is any flexibility in the application of this rule or any process to appeal it?

    Thanks

    • David Morris says:

      Hi Alan, unfortunately, I am not aware of any appeal process on this. I agree that it is arbitrary, but they enforce it rigorously, and don’t appear to have any leeway.

  53. Elisabeth McNair says:

    I was 70 this past June and I worked for the GPO from September 1958 until March 1963 when I emigrated to Canada. From what I gather I won’t be ab le to claim a pension but would like it confirmed.
    Thank you

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Elisabeth,
      Unfortunately, you are correct. You needed a minimum of 10 qualifying years to be eligible for a partial pension. Your work experience only would have given you 5 or 6.

  54. Stephen Mann says:

    Me and my wife worked in the UK for 13 years, before emigrating in 1983, my wife worked for the government a paid into superannuation and has a letter when she resigned in 1982, she had a pension of £612.50 or a Lump sum of £1878.30 when she reached 60, which she did this February.
    It also says it is tied to the cost of living, how does she go about getting this. Thanks for any help.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Stephen,
      It sounds like you are talking about a work pension, rather that the Basic State Pension. All work related pensions are different. I can only suggest that your wife contacts the government department where she previously worked. They should be able to tell her exactly how to go about claiming it

  55. Ruth Milner says:

    Hi David,
    I was born in 1952. I had 3 weeks work in 1968. I stared working properly about June 1970. I was married on Sept 9 1972. I don’t know what my status as wife was, but I had two babies before I left England in 1981. I received my pension papers today – I will reach pension age on 6/11/13. My questions to you are this – will it change the effect on my pension if I ask for a deferred pension? And can I count the 3 weeks in 1968?
    I’ve been accessing the web site dwp.gov.uk/eservice, and I can’t get past the first page header Government Pension because it won’t let me fill in Country, Telephone Type and something else. Not much of a web site!

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Ruth,
      Your eligibility for a pension is not affected by you deciding to defer taking it. The only impact is that for every year you defer, the amount you will receive will go up. Once you take the pension, the amount is frozen from that point onwards.
      In regard to your children, if you were not working and claiming child benefit for them, you might be eligible for National Insurance credits for those years, which would increase your base pension.
      I don’t know the answer to the 3 weeks question. My guess is that you need a full year of contributions to have that year count as an eligible year, but you would need to confirm that with the pension service.

  56. Tami Cushing says:

    I am a Canadian citizen that worked and lived in Scotland from Oct 77 until March 88. Worked all those years. My retirement date would be 2025. As a Canadian am I entitled?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Tami,
      Yes, providing your company made National Insurance contributions for you (which they likely would have), you would be entitled to a partial UK pension. It has nothing to do with citizenship, only contributions. You will also be eligible to make additional voluntary contributions. If you join us, we can give you info on how to do that.

  57. I will be receiving a British pension starting next February. My wife, who has never lived or worked in the UK will be 65 on June 5, 2016. From reading the above she seems to miss out on the 60% pension by 36 days, correct? That will have a far bigger impact on us than the non-indexing of British pensions!

    • David Morris says:

      Hi Stuart, no. Your wife was born on June 5, 1951, correct ? If so, she has already reached state pension age in 2012. Her retirement age was 61, because it was a gradual increase. Once you reach retirement age next year, your spouse will then be entitled to a spousal pension equal to about 60% of yours.

  58. Jane Walton says:

    David I was born March 1973

  59. Jane Walton says:

    Hi there, I lived and worked in the UK all my life, working from 1989 to 2002 until I emigrated to Canada, am I eligible for a partial pension and at what age is that now there and how would I apply for this and when?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Jane, without knowing your date of birth, I can’t tell you when you would reach retirement age. The retirement age for women is increasing gradually from 60 to 66 over the next few years, so it would depend.
      You certainly appear to have accrued enough years to be eligible for at least a partial pension, and you should be able to increase that by making back contributions and voluntary National Insurance payments going forward. If you reach retirement age after 2016, you will need between 7 and 10 eligible years to qualify for anything, and you already have that. So yes, you are eligible.
      If you are able to make voluntary payments, that is something you should consider doing as soon as possible, because it will increase your pension amount. If you join us, we can give you a package of information on exactly what to do. We are a non profit group fighting on behalf of UK pensioners whose pensions are frozen. We also provide support and information to our members about pension issues.

  60. Alexander Holburn says:

    I just joined CABP and want to clarify my wife’s eligibility. She is British and paid several years of NI before we emigrated to Canada in 1974.
    I will be 65 next July and she will be 60 next April. I will have paid up all of my 30 years NI contributions by next April and so will get the full pension when I’m 65 but under the new rules coming in 2016 she will not get the 60% pension as she will only be 62 in April 2016. Is that correct.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Alexander,
      Unfortunately you are correct about your spouse and the 60% pension. However, she may be able to get some pension based on her own NI record. She should be able to buy back some years and make some more voluntary contributions until she reaches retirement age. The class B Spousal pension will no longer exist after April 2016

  61. Diago Velarod says:

    I am a 61 years old british citizen living in South America. I only worked in the UK between 1980 and 1983 and have no records of my work. Am I entitled to any pension?

    Thanks,,

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Diago,
      You may be eligible. You would need to write to the Dept of Works and Pensions, and tell them where you last worked or lived in the UK

  62. Dear David,

    I was born in the UK, but emigrated when I was 2.5 months old. I returned to England in 2005 and left in May of 2012. Under what rules do I qualify for a UK pension? I now know from reading the previous comments that I may be able to buy back and forward years before I retire. Who do I need to contact regarding the Class 2 or 3 contributions. I was born Oct, 7 1954.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Dawn,
      You will reach pension age in 2020, which means you fall under the new legislation. You will need a minimum of 7 – 10 contribution years to be eligible. I don’t know if you worked in the UK when you were there, and if you have a National Insurance number. If you do, then you are able to make voluntary contributions to build up the number of years, and you certainly have time to continue to make contributions before retirement age.
      If you join us, we can give you a package of information about how to apply, and how to know whether you can make class 2 contributions.
      We will also be fighting on your behalf to get that pension uprated before you claim it.

  63. Vivienne says:

    Dear David,

    I was born in the UK but left when I was 7 when my parents moved to South Africa.

    I am now living in Canada and am aged 57 and planning to go back to the UK once I have retired. I have never worked in UK but is there any way I can make voluntary payments into the NI fund before I retire, thus allowing me a very small additional pension in my retirement?

    Thank you in advance for your assistance.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Vivienne, before you can make voluntary contributions, you need to have a National Insurance number. You would have to contact HM Revenue and Customs on how to apply for one. I believe an interview is required, but I am not sure exactly how that works. I know that you have to be eligible to work in the UK before you can get one. Presumably your birth in the UK might qualify you, but I am not conversant with the specific rules about work eligibility. You should contact HM Revenue and Customs about this

  64. Good Morning David,
    My husband worked on private farms during the summers from the time he was 13. He then attended university for 4 years and worked part time during the summers. After graduation he worked for 2 years before immigrating to Canada.
    He was born May 08, 1952, present age 61. I was born Aug. 10, 1952, present age 61.
    How many years does he have left to be eligible to contribute?
    Is there a max. he is able to contribute each year?
    I noticed in a previous response, you said the sooner he starts to contribute the better, would you please explain why?
    Am I eligible to receive part of his pension, never having lived or worked in the UK?
    Thank you in advance, your responses to others questions have been most helpful.
    Cheers

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Judy, your husband will reach retirement age in May 2017, which means he will fall under the new legislation. To qualify for any pension, he will need a minimum of between 7 and 10 eligible years (the law isn’t clear yet). With his employment record, it isn’t clear how many eligible years he will have. It is likely it is only 2. However, he may be able to buy back a number of years, and can make voluntary contributions for the next 3 or 4 years. Each year you buy back, or make a voluntary contribution is a fixed amount established for each year. It is not a variable amount, so there is no maximum as such. The reason he needs to start asap is because he needs to build up to the minimum number of years to be eligible. As each year goes by, he loses the option of buying back the furthest year back, as they are time limited and expire.

      Your case is a little more complicated. You reach pension age under the old rules. As it stands today, you will be eligible for a category B pension, based on your husbands NI contribution record. This equals approx. 60% of his pension. If you had reached pension age under the new rules in 2016, you would not be eligible for anything.

      You should consider joining us asap. It is only $20 for a family membership, and we will provide a package of information to help you get started.
      Hope this helps

  65. Emma Duers says:

    Hi David,
    Thank you for your prompt reply.Very efficient.
    Can you please tell me why in September 2014 when my birthday falls on the 28/06/2014 (62yrs) I was lead to believe that I will be eligible for a pension as of May 2014.
    Can you please confirm which the is correct date.

    Much appreciated,
    Kindest regards,
    Emma Duers

    • David Morris says:

      Hi Emma, the pension age for retirement is gradually changing over the next few years. According to the UK pension age calculator, you reach retirement at 62 years, 2 months and 9 days

  66. Emma Duers says:

    Hi David,
    I am Maltese and married to a British citizen.
    My husband receives a British pension.
    I was born on 28/06/52 but never paid Ni in UK as we live in Malta.
    I have been told that I eligible to a British pension if yes when and how much will I get.
    Thank you for your help.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Emma,
      your UK pension retirement date is September 2014. That means you fall under the existing legislation, which allows you to get a UK pension based on your husbands Contribution record. So yes, you will be eligible for a pension of some kind. The amount will be approx. 60% of your husbands pension.
      If you join us we can give you more info on how to go about claiming.

  67. toby evison says:

    hi, I was born & raised,educated in England staring work in late 1971 until September of 2005, apart from a couple of breaks totalling less than 1 year for an extended holiday & working abroad. I was born in jan 1955. I married my wife, who was born dec.1956, in nov. 1975. she had worked in England for approx. 2years up to then but has been a stay at home mum since our wedding having no employment since but making no benefit claim except for family allowance. will we be entitled to claim uk pensions as our respective retirement dates come after the start of the new arrangements? best regards toby evison
    .

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Toby, you will certainly be eligible for a UK pension when you reach retirement age. You can also make back contributions, and future contributions until you reach retirement age, which will likely give you a full UK pension. Your wife will have to be eligible based on her own record. She will no longer be able to claim a pension based on your contribution record. She may be able to get eligible years credit for years spent child rearing, and will also be able to buy back years and make future contributions, to at least get a partial pension.
      If you join us (only $20 for a family membership) we can give you a package of information on how to apply, and what to expect.

  68. Christine says:

    Sorry forgot to say that I was born and bred in England…
    I will be 61 in October, and I realize that I will probably have to wait until I am 65
    Thanks again

  69. Christine says:

    Hi there,
    I am now 60 years old and came to live in the states in 1999 at the age of 46
    I worked from being 15 – 46 And paid all my contributions, do I qualify for a pension from England if I
    Still live in the states?
    Thank you

  70. I am a British citizen who emigrated to Canada in 1982 and am now a Canadian citizen. I worked in England from 1975-1982 and paid my NI contributions. I am 55 years old right now. Do I qualify for a British Pension? Many thanks.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Jackie,
      You will fall under the new legislation in 2016, which requires either 7 or 10 years of NI Contributions to be eligible for a partial pension (They haven’t decided which it is yet). Based on your age, and existing contributions, you will certainly be able to reach that eligibility level by making voluntary contributions from now until you reach retirement age. You will also be able to buy back some years. So yes, you will qualify.
      If you join us, we can provide an information package on how to apply and what to expect – and of course, we will be fighting on your behalf to get that pension indexed for you.

  71. So the single person pension is my only entitlement even though I am married?

    • David Morris says:

      HI Steve, yes. After 2016 people can only get a pension based on their own contribution record. There will be no spousal pensions.

  72. By the way my wife won’t be sixty five for another ten years.

    • David Morris says:

      I was going to ask your wife’s age. A spouse is not eligible for a class b pension until you both have reached retirement age. Given her age, she won’t reach retirement age for at least 11 years.
      Unfortunately, as she reaches retirement after 2016, she will be affected by the new legislation coming into play in 2016. Spousal pensions are being eliminated after 2016, and anyone who reaches retirement age after 2016 will be affected.
      In other words, she will not be eligible for a spousal pension.

  73. Hi David,

    First have to say this is the first website on UK pensions that makes sense.

    I am 65 next month. Worked in the UK from 1963 to 1990. I have filled in the on-line form and have received notification of a pension of £114 per week. Which is the single person rate. I am married to a lady from Mexico and stated that in my pension application. Even sent marriage and birth certificates as requested. There is no mention of the category B pension for my wife. What should I do??

    Thank for your help.

  74. Joan Paterson says:

    I worked in Dublin, Ireland from 1951 to 1957. Am I entitled to a British pension? If not, what pension might I be entitled to besides my Canadian pensions?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Joan, unfortunately, working in Dublin does not give you any eligibility for a UK state pension. You may be eligible for an Irish pension, but I am not familiar with the rules on that. They are quite complex. You would need to contact the Irish dept of social services

  75. hi..mum is 75..she worked in England from 1961 -1966 before emigrating. does she qualify for a UK pension?

    • David Morris says:

      Hi pk,
      It depends. When she retired, the legislation in force at the time required a minimum of 10 years National Insurance contributions to be eligible for any pension. She does not have that from her work record, however, if she was not working because of child rearing, there may be a possibility of getting credit years for those child rearing years.

  76. I worked in England as a teenager a few winters, as well as about 2 years full time before I moved to Canada.
    I was born 1958…
    Would I be eligible for any kind of pension when I turn 65? Is it worth looking into buying contributions?
    I am confused by all the changing rules.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Liz,
      You will fall under the new rules, as you will reach retirement age after 2016 (which is when the new rules come into effect). Your actual retirement age is likely to be 66, as the retirement age is increasing. Based on the new rules, you will need between 7 and 10 years of contributions to qualify for any pension. While you do not have that number of years now, You certainly have time to make voluntary contributions between now and your retirement age to meet (or exceed) the minimum required. This would qualify you for a percentage of the full pension.
      It is important that you take action soon, as every year that goes by loses you the opportunity to make a voluntary NI Contribution.
      If you join us, we can give you a package of information that sets out the options clearly, and tells you how to go about getting started.

  77. Michael Rice says:

    Thanks for the information, David. At such time as I move on to the next adventure, will bereavement benefits apply for my wife, in this case ? Or are they wiped out also ?

  78. Michael Rice says:

    Hi David………. I’m currently receiving a British State Pension. My wife was born in 1955, so will reach age 60 in 2015, but will not reach 65 until 2020.

    Is there any likelihood that she may qualify for a Category B pension …. or will either the present rules, or those before Parliament rule this out ?

    Thanks ! ……….. Michael

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Michael,
      your wife will fall under the new rules currently before Parliament. As those rules stand today, she will only be eligible for a pension based on her own NI contribution record. Category B pensions (otherwise known as spousal pensions, or derived pensions) are being eliminated, effective 2016. Things could change, but as it stands today, she would not be eligible.

  79. Anne Eadie says:

    David – thank you for the speedy reply. I will send in membership fee. I look forward to the package. Thank you for the help.

  80. Anne Eadie says:

    Hi – I worked in Scotland from 1962 – 1968 and then emigrated to Canada. I turned 60 in 2006. My husband worked summer jobs during university years from 1961 – 67 and full time till 1968. He turned 65 in 2010.
    Would either of us qualify for a pension?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Anne, based on your info, you would not qualify. You would need 10 years of contributions to be eligible for anything. However, your husband might. If he turned 65 after April 6, 2010, then he could come under the new rules, where he would only need 1 year of contributions. He may also be eligible to buy back some years to increase his pension. You should not delay, because every year that goes by, he loses the right to buy back 1 year. It is definitely worth pursuing.
      If you join us, we can give you an information package on how to apply.

  81. Dorothy Gibbons says:

    Hi David, my actual date of birth is Jan. 08, 1950. How do I go about joining you.

    Dorothy

    • David Morris says:

      Hi Dorothy, that was what I was afraid of. The pension rules changed in 2007, I think. Basically they said that if you reached pension age before the 6th of April 2010, you went under the old rules which required you to have a minimum of 10 years of credits before being eligible for even a partial pension.
      The new rules that came into force said that if you reached pension age after April 6, 2010, you only needed 1 year to qualify.
      Based on your birthday, you reached pension age in January, 2010, so you fall under the old rules (only by 3 months). I don’t think you have 10 years, even counting your maternity years. That would indicate you aren’t eligible.
      It is certainly worth a try, though. Who knows, they may have some leeway. You should contact the pension service and ask

  82. Dorothy Gibbons says:

    Hi David, I did not realize my years I stayed at home when my daughter was born counted, this was from March 1969 to April 1972. Thanks

    • David Morris says:

      Hi Dorothy, hello to a fellow Belfaster.
      It will depend on your actual date of birth. If you fall under one set of rules, you would only need 1 year for eligibility. The older rules, you would need 10. I can tell you which if I know your exact date of birth. Either way, you have reached retirement age already. For women, it was 60, rising to 65 by 2018. I suspect you are eligible for at least a partial pension, and you will be able to buy back some years to increase it.
      If you join us, we can give you a package of info on how to go about claiming it, and will be fighting on your behalf to get it indexed to inflation

  83. Dorothy Gibbons says:

    Hi David, I worked in Belfast from mid 1965 to late 1968, would I be eligible. I have live in Canada since 1972 and will reach 65 in 2015.

  84. wendy Daphne Ingram says:

    last year I sent in all my information and they in Newcastle said I did not qualify..But I did work 2 years in england in 1949 to 1951 when my parents decided to emigrate to Canada….Maybe I should see 30% for each year. please let me know
    thanks wendy Ingram

    • David Morris says:

      Hi Wendy, I’m sorry to say that you don’t qualify. You came under the rules where you needed 10 years of contributions to be eligible for anything. If you gave Newcastle all the info, then that looks like it.
      Sorry

  85. John Byrne says:

    I worked in England for 7yrs,now live in Canada,I’m 49 now and worked there
    when I was 16-to-23 years old.Would it worth researching for a possible pension
    Thanks John

    • David Morris says:

      Hello John,
      It is certainly worth pursuing this. As it stands today, you will be eligible for a UK pension on retirement. You will come under the new rules being proposed for 2016, which will actually be increasing the base pension amount substantially. You will be able to make back contributions to catch up on prior years, and will be able to contribute every year going forward until you reach retirement age. Depending on the actual dates, you could well qualify for a full pension, providing you make voluntary contributions for every year you can.
      If you join us (only $20 a year) we can give you a detailed package of information on how to go about getting started. The sooner you start, the sooner you can make back contributions. If you delay, you can lose those optional years.
      We will be fighting on your behalf to get pensions indexed, so that when you do finally start collecting it, it will be indexed to inflation every year.
      Dave

  86. Elane Maar says:

    Hello David – I have been married to a British subject since 2004. I have never lived in UK. My husband has been receiving his British pension for a number of years (he is 73 years old). He has lived in Canada since 1975. I turned 60 last year. Could you please let me know if I might be eligible for a spousal Category B pension as mentioned in the above article ? Thank you.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Elane,
      The short answer is yes. You likely will be eligible for a Class B pension when you reach retirement age, which for you will be either the end of 2013 or in 2014, depending on your birthday. If you have not been employed the last few years, your husband has been eligible to receive a top up to his pension equal to the amount that you will receive on retirement. If he has been receiving that top up, then once you receive your class B pension, his top up will be cancelled, so the net family total remains the same. If he has not been receiving that top up, then your class B pension will be additional.
      Please consider joining us. For only $20 a year, we can provide you with information on how and when to apply for the class B pension, and we will be fighting on your behalf to get both yours and your husbands pension unfrozen
      thanks

  87. Maralyn Jullienne says:

    Hi David
    I have been directed to this site by a friend who reminded me that I worked in UK from 1962 until 1967 and then moved to Canada. I will be 67 this month. From what I understand, I may be entitled to some pension? This is good news. Would you be kind enough to confirm this before I go further with you?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Maralyn,
      much as I would like you to join us, I think it is very unlikely you will qualify for a pension, based on the info you provided. You would have reached retirement age prior to April 2010 (which is when the rules changed). Based on the old rules, you would need at least 10 years of contributions to be eligible for a partial pension. You likely have 6 or 7 years from when you worked there, but that won’t be enough, and it is now too late for you to make enough voluntary contributions.
      Sorry

  88. linda mccutcheon says:

    Hi
    Husband worked in UK 1967/2000 I worked 1972/98 he retires 2016 are we entitled to full British Pension here in Canada

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Linda,
      Based on what you say, your husband looks like he would be eligible for a full UK state pension. In your case, you will certainly be eligible for at least a partial pension. Without knowing your age and retirement date, it isn’t possible to tell you exactly how much.
      If you join us, we can give you a detailed package of info that will explain your eligibility in more detail, and tell you how to go about claiming both pensions.
      We will also be fighting on your behalf to get those pensions indexed to inflation.

  89. nester midsmith says:

    I worked in the UK from Aug 1966 until Aug 1973 (7 years) in local government. I have lived in Canada ever since. I’m 65 in April 2015. I still have UK citizenship as well as Canadian citizenship. Am i likely to be eligible for a uk retirement pension?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Nester,
      Given your retirement date, you fall under the rules where only 1 year of national Insurance contributions is required for eligibility for a partial UK pension, so you will be eligible. You will also be able to make additional contributions to increase that pension. If you join us, we can give you a package of information on how to register and apply for the pension, and how to make additional contributions. Don’t wait until you are 65 before doing this, as you will then lose the ability to buy additional years. You can only buy additional years up to the time you reach retirement age.

  90. Dave Nelson says:

    Good Morning,

    I contacted the UK pensions office about eligibility and was told I should apply to find out.
    Born May 1943 and worked continually in the UK from August 1959 until I came to Canada in January 1967. Is it worth filling in the forms or not please?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Dave,
      Given your age, you fall under the previous rules. You need 10 qualifying years to be eligible for a partial pension. It looks like you could have 9, so you are very close. If it was me, I would apply anyway.

  91. Peter McMahon says:

    I am a 66 year old Canadian citizen and I worked in England from 1967 to 1975 and made contributions during that period. From what I read I may qualify to collect a British pension What information do I need to apply for the pension?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Peter,
      Based on your info, you are likely eligible for a partial UK Pension. If you join our organisation, we provide you with a complete package of information on exactly how to apply for your pension, and what info you will need. Your membership fee of only $20 a year enables us to fight on your behalf to get your pension indexed to inflation. We are a not for profit, volunteer organisation working on behalf of all our members. Please join us, and we can assist you.

  92. Lynn Doak says:

    My husband worked in UK from 1965-1974 then moved to Canada. Retiring this year at age 65. Will his UK pension effect his CPP and OAS?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Lynn,
      Your husbands CPP pension will not be affected in any way by a UK pension. The OAS will only be affected if his total annual net income from all sources in 2013 (including UK pension)exceeds $70,954. Once that income level is reached, the Canadian Government will “clawback” a percentage of the OAS. The OAS is eliminated entirely if his total income is above $113,000. Only about 5% of all seniors receiving OAS actually are affected by this clawback. If your husbands net income is under the threshhold amount when he retires, then his OAS will not be affected at all.

  93. Paul Andrews says:

    Hi, I will be 65 in 2020. I worked in England full-time from Aug. 1977 to Mar. 1988 so I assume that means I made 11 years worth of NI contributions. According to your responses previously, I believe this means I would be entitled to more than 1/3rd of the full pension but not until I reach the age of 66 with the new legislation? I am interested in how I can make extra contributions and how much they would cost. I am also curious as to how my Canadian pension rights may be affected if I do qualify for a UK pension?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Paul,
      Given your age, you will come under the new pending legislation for pensions. Under that legislation, the basic state pension amount will actually increase from 110 pounds today to about 140 pounds a week, using todays rates. In 2020 the actual amount will be greater. The eligibility rules are also changing. You will now need 35 years of contributions instead of 30 to obtain a full pension. Based on your information, you likely have 11 years – which means you will qualify for a reduced pension. You will also have the option of making an annual voluntary contribution going forward to retirement, which should give you another 7 or 8 years, and you may also have the option of making some retroactive contributions. That may get you close to 2/3 of the full pension. The cost of a voluntary contribution will depend on whether you would be eligible for a class 2 or class 3 contribution. There is quite a difference financially. A class 2 costs about 140 pounds, vs a class 3 which is about 704 pounds, for 1 year. Both classes are identical in terms of their giving you pension eligibility, so you really want to make class 2 contributions if you can.
      We provide a package of info to our members that describes in detail how to make voluntary contributions, and what the eligibility rules are for class 2.
      In terms of a Canadian pension, receiving a UK pension does not affect your canadian eligibility in any way. CPP is based on contributions through your working life in Canada, and you are entitled to that no matter what else you may be entitled to. So your CPP pension is completely unaffected.
      The only other possible impact is that all income is included in the calculation of whether your OAS pension may be subject to partial clawback.
      Right now, clawback of some portion of OAS begins when your total net annual income from all sources exceeds $67,000. If your UK pension takes you over that amount, then some portion of the OAS would be “clawed back”. That only applies to OAS, however. CPP is not affected.
      I hope this helps, and you will consider joining us. For only $20 a year, we provide a lot of information to help you, and we are fighting on your behalf to get your UK pension indexed to inflation.
      We are a not for profit, volunteer organisation.

  94. Joyce Armstrong says:

    i, I was born on 22nd September 1951, and worked full-time in the UK from the age of 16,(but some years I did not work when I was home with my children)I lived in the UK until 1988 when my family moved to the USA. Am I eligible for a pension and what would be the date that I am eligible to claim pension, I will be 62 in September 2013.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Joyce,
      Yes, you would be eligible for a british pension. Based on your birthdate, in fact, you are eligible in March 2013. The exact amount you are eligible for is difficult to estimate as you can get credit for both working years and child raising years. You need 30 years to qualify for a ful pension, and it looks like you may be roughly 2/3 of that. At todays rates, that would be approx 66 pounds a week. You may also have the option to buy back some additional years, which would increase that amount.
      We provide our new members with a detailed package of information on who to write to, and how to apply.
      I hope you will consider joining us.

  95. Robert Anderson says:

    Hi I turned 65 in June 2011 and worked in UK from 1961-1981 when I moved to Canada

    Would I be entitled to any pension?

    RA

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Robert,
      Based on your info, yes, you are entitled to a pension. It sounds like you will have about 20 years of eligible contributions. That will get you 2/3 of a full pension, which would be approx 65 pounds a week. In addition, if you are married, your spouse would be eligible for a category B pension, which is about 60% of your pension – approx 26 pounds a week. In total, that is about $140 a week, or $7,280 a year. As you have already reached retirement age, you probably won’t be able to buy any additional years.
      We can help you with a detailed package of information on how to apply and what to expect. Unfortunately, once you receive your pension, it will be frozen at the initial level. You will not receive any cost of living increases, because of the UK’s discriminatory policy.
      We are a not for profit, volunteer based organisation working to help people get the pensions they are entitled to, and fighting to get them indexed.
      I hope you will consider joining us. It is only $20 a year, and we provide you with a lot of good information and ongoing support.

  96. harold Powner says:

    Hi,my name is Harold Powner,Iworked in Coventry England,from 1966-1979,i still hold a British passport,I now live in Canada,im a Canadian citizen.Do i qualify for a British pension i will be 65,in November 2015.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Harold,
      based on your information, yes, you qualify for a British pension. It looks like you will have about 13 qualifying years, which will give you over 1/3 of a full pension. At todays rates, that would give you roughly 35 – 40 pounds per week. You will likely also be able to buy additional years by making voluntery contributions, which could increase that amount. In addition, if you are married, your spouse will qualify for a Category B pension – even if ahe is not originally from the UK.
      If you join us (only $20 per year), we can give you a package of info on how to apply and who to write to. We also support our members by answering pension related questions, and by keeping them up to date on our fight to get pensions indexed to inflation in Canada.
      We are volunteers, non profit, working to support UK pensioners in Canada. Your membership helps with that, and helps us help you.

  97. Bernie Watts says:

    David,
    I worked in the UK from the age of 15 until about 27, I’m not sure whether or not I paid NI for all of those years. I am now retired here in Canada and I am 67 years old, would I be entitled for a pension? My wife applied for one on her own and was advised she would have a pension of 11p and sent her a cheque which she never cashed. I assumed that mine would be similar so I never bothered to follow up.

    Regards

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Bernie,
      If you turned 65 after April 2010 (sounds like you did), then yes, you will be eligible for a partial pension. The exact amount will depend on the number of years NI contributions were made. Assuming you have – say – 10 years of contributions, you would get 1/3 of a full pension. At todays amounts, that would be roughly 36 pounds per week. In addition, your wife would be eligible for a category B pension of roughly 22 pounds per week, for a total of about 58 pounds a week. That is about $90 a week at todays rates. I would say that is certainly worth following up.
      We can help you with all the info on how to apply.

  98. Geoff Lilley says:

    I’ll be 64 in June 2013. I worked in the UK from 1964 to 1980 and have been told I have 16 qualifying years. My wife (65 this year) worked in the UK for only 5 year and was told she has no qualifying years. Is she entitled to a category B pension?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Geoff, Yes, your wife should be eligible for a category B pension, which will be based on your pension amount. If you don’t already know, you should be able to purchase some additional years to increase your own basic amount.
      I hope you will consider joining us. We keep our members fully informed of all the changes to pension legislation, and are able to answer questions when needed. Your pension will be frozen unfairly the day you start receiving it, and we are lobbying the UK government to change this discriminatory practice

  99. Pat Holohan says:

    I worked in the UK from 1974 to 1980
    I will be 65 in 2015
    Will I be elligible for a partial pension?

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Pat,
      Based on this information, if you are male, then yes you will be eligible for a partial pension. You only need 1 year to qualify, and 30 years to get the maximum pension. You will also be able to buy back some previous years to increase the amount. You should pursue this.
      If you are female (Pat could be either male or female), it will depend on when in 2010 you turned 60. If it was after April 1 2010, you will be eligible for a partial pension, but cannot buy back any previous years.
      Please consider joining us. We will provide you with a complete package of info on how to apply, and who to write to. We are also fighting on your behalf to get your pension indexed to inflation.

  100. June Bowers says:

    Hi David
    I worked in Scotland in 1962 and 1963 for the summer holidays, then I started full time employment in december 1963 until I emigrated to Canada in November 1967. Would I be entitled to a Pension I turned 65 in 2012
    Thank you

    • David Morris says:

      Hello June,
      The retirement age for females before April 2010 was 60, so if you reached the age of 60 before that date, then you would fall under the old rules. Those rules said that if you reached 60 before 2010, then you needed at least 10 qualifying years to be eligible for a partial pension. If you turned 60 after 2010, then you would only need 1 year to qualify. Based on what you said, it looks like you come under the old rules, and also that you likely only have a maximum of 7 years of contributions. This would not be enough to be eligible for a partial pension, I’m afraid. Once you reach retirement age you usually also can’t make any further voluntary contributions.
      You could always ask the UK pension service, but it doesn’t look promising.

  101. Hi David, I worked in the UK from 1974 to 2011. My health is poor now & would like to retire when i am around 61 year of age.

    I will be considering joining here for the $20as i will need all the advice & help i can get.

    Thank you

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Robert,
      Looks like you have enough national Insurance contributions to qualify for a full UK pension. As I mentioned, you can’t claim it until you are at least 65. At that time you will be entitled to whatever the full pension is in that year. Under the new legislation being proposed, it would be about 144 pounds a week in 2013 dollars. That amount will increase every year until the year you reach your retirement age, and you will receive the amount that is current at that time.
      For many countries throughout the world, UK pensioners who live in those countries receive an annual increase in their pension for inflation. In Canada, you don’t. Your pension will be fixed at the amount that you initially receive, and never change.
      We believe this is a huge injustice, and we are waging a campaign in the UK to get this discriminatory policy changed. Your membership fee helps support this fight, for you and all other frozen pensioners
      Thanks

  102. I have worked in the UK since i was 16, always payed national insurance. i moved to Canada 2011. I would like to know if i would get full or partial pension & if i retired early could i claim any pension.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Robert,
      The first answer is that you can only claim a pension when you reach retirement age. There is no provision for an early retirement pension.
      In terms of your eligibility for a UK pension, I can’t tell you without knowing your age, and how many years you worked in the UK. The general guideline is,
      1. If you will reach retirement age (at least 65) after 2017, you will need at least 7 years of National Insurance contributions and 35 years for a full pension.
      2. If you reached retirement age between 2010 and 2017, you only need 1 year for a partial pension and 30 years for a full pension
      3. If you reached retirement age before 2010, you will need at least 11 years for a partial and 45 years for a full pension
      I’m guessing that you have quite a few years of National Insurance contributions, so you should be eligible for either a full pension, or a sizeable percentage of one.

      Please consider joining us. It is only $20 a year, and we can give you a detailed package of information on how to find out how much pension you are entitled to, and how to claim it. We also will be fighting on your behalf to get that pension indexed to inflation

  103. Steve Hooper says:

    I am 58 years old and a british citizen living in Canada. I only worked in the UK between 1970 and 1971. Am I entitled to any pension, or is it possible to make any contributions so that I could be.

    • David Morris says:

      Hello Steve,
      You will be affected by the proposed legislation changes which are currently scheduled to come into effect in 2017. You will reach retirement age after 2017, so the new changes will apply to you. As the proposals stand now (and they may change), you will need between 7 and 10 qualifying years to be eligible for a partial pension (The actual number of qualifying years has not yet been decided). You are able to make voluntary contributions from now until you reach retirement age, and may also be able to buy back some previous years. It is therefore very likely that you can accumulate enough years to qualify for a partial pension. It would make sense for you to pursue this further, while you still have time to accumulate qualifying years.

  104. Hi
    I am British and worked there from age 16 until my late 20,s when I left the country. I am now 52, will I be entitled to a pension and if so, when should I apply?
    Thanks for your help.

    • David Morris says:

      Hi Audrey,
      Based on your information, it looks like you would have at least 10 qualifying years through National Insurance contributions while you were working in the UK. This would make you eligible for a partial pension. You also have the opportunity to continue to make voluntary contributions until you reach retirement age, and may be able to buy back previous years. This would increase the pension you would receive. If you opted to make voluntary contributions going forward, those – plus what you already earned when you were employed in the UK – would likely take you pretty close to getting a full pension. This is something you should certainly pursue, as you are entitled to this pension.
      Please consider joining us. We are a non profit group of volunteers lobbying the UK govt to provide full cost of living increases to UK pensioners living in Canada, and other selected countries that are being discriminated against. We can also help you with what to do next, who to write to, and what to expect back.
      Thanks

  105. Linda Greenwood says:

    Hi. Just read your article in the British Canadian. I worked in England from June 1970 to March 1975. I am 58 next month,I will be 65 in Mar 2020, after reading your article I am wondering would it be worth my while to contribute to the British pension, what would it cost per month and what could I expect to receive at age 65.
    Thank You Linda Greenwood.

    • David Morris says:

      Hi Linda,
      The first thing you should know is that major changes to the UK pension system are being discussed. New rules are being implemented in 2017, and you will be affected by them.
      As the proposals exist today, you will reach pension age at 66, in 2021. Based on your employment in the UK, you may currently have 6 years of qualifying experience. The new rules are currently stating that you would need between 7 and 10 qualifying years to get a partial pension (this may change). This would mean that you would not be eligible. However,You have the opportunity to buy additional qualifying years between now and 2021. You may also be able to “buy back” previous years. If you opt to only buy going forward to 2021, that could give you another 8 – 9 years, bringing you up to 14-15. This would qualify you for a partial pension. As of todays rates, a full pension is 110 pounds per week. Under the new proposed legislation, the full pension would increase by approx 30%.
      It would definetely be worth your while to at least find out what your options are. Please consider joining us. For only $20 a year, we can tell you exactly how to apply for a pension forecast, and what your options are for buying additional years.
      We also keep our members fully informed of the latest legislative changes, and of course, we continue to fight on your behalf to get your pension indexed to inflation.
      Thanks

  106. I worked in Scotland from age 15 till age 22 I am now retired and would like to know if I am entitled to a reduced pension ?

    • David Morris says:

      It would depend on when you actually retired. If you reached retirement age of 65 before April 6, 2010, then you would need a minimum of 11 qualifying years to be eligible for any pension. Based on your information provided, you would not have those 11 years. If you reached 65 after April 6, 2010, then you only need 1 qualifying year for a partial pension. If you made NI contributions for the 7 years you worked, then you likely would qualify for some pension.

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