Eligibility for UK State Pension

To be eligible for a UK state pension, you need to have been employed or self-employed in the UK and/or have made National Insurance Contributions for a certain minimum number of years (which could include voluntary contributions or time spent in child care).

These years of National Insurance contributions are referred to as “qualifying years”. Depending on your age, the number of years that you need to qualify for a minimum pension will vary. There are three main groups of pensioners. 

To see where you stand with regard to your pension, place yourself in one of three categories that may apply:

1)  Men born before 6th April 1945 and women born before 6th April 1950

These people reached pension age (65 for a man and 60 for a woman) before 6th April 2010.  A man needs a minimum of 11 years National Insurance contributions and a woman needs a minimum of 10 years National Insurance contributions to get any pension at all.  It is too late for people in this age group to make any extra payments, but there may be some credits for years of education, apprenticeship or training from age 16 onwards.

2) Men born on or after 6th April 1945 and before 6th April 1951. Women born on or after 6th April 1950 and before 6th April 1953

Men in this group reach pension age at 65.  Women reach pension age somewhere between 60 and 63 (as the pension age is steadily rising to match that for men).  People in this group get some pension for every year of National Insurance contributions.  A full pension requires 30 years’ contributions, and one year gets 1/30th of a full pension which currently stands at £126 per week. Between two and seven voluntary contributions can be made to top-up your contributions depending on your pension date.

3) Men born on or after 6th April 1951 and women born on or after 6th April 1953

The pension age for men in this age group is steadily increasing, starting at 65 for men and 63 for women.

People in this group reach pension age on or after 6th April 2016, and will need a minimum of 10 years’ National Insurance contributions. 35 years are needed to get a full pension of about £160 per week.  Also you can make a minimum of 10 voluntary payments to top up your pension contributions.

Voluntary contributions are a very good investment.  The usual Class 3 contribution costs about £700 for each year purchased, and this is recouped in under 4 years once your pension starts.  The Class 2 contribution, usually available to people who are working, costs only £143 for each year, and is recouped within the first year of pension.  You must have worked 3 years in the UK, or lived in the UK for 3 continuous years to qualify. The Class 2 option is being cancelled by the Government effective April 2019

A partial pension is simply prorated based on the number of qualifying years you have. For example, if you have 10 qualifying years, then you would be eligible for a pension equal to 1/3 of the full pension amount. For 2017, the full UK state pension is £8.112 per annum.

These qualifying years provide what is known as a Category A Pension. In addition, the spouse or civil partner of someone receiving a Category A pension may be entitled to receive a Category B pension, even if they have never worked in the UK, lived in the UK, or even visited the UK themselves. The Category B pension is based on a percentage of the Category A pension being received by the main pensioner, (approximately 60%).

Comments

  1. Hello Dave updated report my end finally been approved for class 2 but is there an easier way to pay other than bank draft from Canada, as you have to add bank service charges from both side of the pond plus when sending you cannot indicate for which year you are paying for and you do not get receipt from UK gov??. Just wondering if there is a work around to this Thanks.

  2. Maureen Boyce says

    My husband and I immigrated to Canada in 1982, I was 23 and had worked for 6 years in the UK, he was 25 and had worked for 9 years. Can we top us his pension to the 10 years or more? Also would I qualify for the 60% of his pension automatically or would I need to top up for the full amount? Do UK pensions start at 65 or 67?

  3. Patricia Clarico says

    My mother was born in England 1932and came to the USA in 1955. She worked while living in England but I don’t how long. Is she eligible for any type of old age pension?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Patricia, she would only be eligible for a UK state pension if she worked and contributed to the UK pension system for at least 10 years, so it seems unlikely that she would qualify

  4. Hi David,

    I entered UK in April 1991 with my wife as a US permanent residence, worked there until Dec 2001. I became a UK citizen around 1996. From 2002 to 2007 I worked in the Netherlands, then returned to US and became US citizen in 2015. Even when in UK, I considered US as my tax domicile, filing US returns, and have not filed any UK tax returns since I left UK. I believe I am entitled to some UK state pension, but am worried if I claim it, then it may adversely impact my US domicile. I currently have no house or bank account in the UK, save for some company pensions that I converted to annuities, with tax code 1185L M1. Is it safe for my domicile to apply for UK state pension?

    Thanks,

    • David Morris says

      Hello Fred, I am not a tax expert, but your domicile will not be affected by receiving a pension from another country.

  5. Wilma Smal says

    Good morning David, Trust you are keeping well. I am writing to you on behalf of my 88 year old grandmother. My grandfather was born 1930/07/14 in Germany and came from Germany to South Africa. My grandmother and grandfather got married 1975/09/19 and he became a permanent resident 1985/04/23. Unfortunately he committed suicide 1989/01/31 where after his brother contacted my grandmother and said she can receive a pension from Germany because of my granddad but she said it was to much paperwork. They were very well off so I don’t think she actually worried about money at that stage and recently only admitted that she has never received any pension from Germany. I don’t know who to contact or what to do in order for her to get a pension from Germany as she also did not claim his pension from his work which he had when he died and I am busy arranging that as well. Can you please maybe tell me which root I should take to get this done?

    Best regards

    • David Morris says

      Hello Wilma, I can’t really help you. I don’t know anything about the German pension system. I suggest you maybe talk to the local German consulate

  6. Hi My husband Mike will retire in September with just 20 years of contribution. I will retire March 2020 but mine is more complex. I had ten years before I had children, then I was 12 years at home because of caring for them before returning to work for another 12 years before needing to care for parents for ten years- but I only realized I could get a cares allowance and my stamp paid for the last seven giving me a total of about 24 years work and 17 protected. Since I have more in than my husband will out joint amounts come to a married couples full amount or will we lose out because his is only 20 years..

    • David Morris says

      Hello Su, from 2016 onwards all pensions are individual and are based on the persons own contribution record. There are no longer any married couples amounts. You will each get what you each are entitled to

  7. My husband is a EU citizen. He has just started working in August 2018. His age is 58. . How long does he have to work in UK to be eligible for the UK pension. He has not yet opted for the pension scheme under NI. Can you suggest what is best for him to do at this age and how long he will have to work and contribute in the UK to be eligible for pension scheme.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Amanda, I am not familiar with EU rules, but in general, EU citizens are entitled to a pension for every year they work anywhere in the EU. This may change with Brexit, but those are the current rules

  8. Sarah Campion says

    Hello, I am asking on behalf of my mum. She is 73 years old, born in the UK, and we have lived in the US since 1995 (she was 50 when we moved here). She was married twice and worked off an on over the years that she was there. Would she qualify for a pension? My dad is 62 and still works here in the States. I looked online and found that she was eligible for a pension in 2006. Will she receive the back pay from then until now? Do you know what sort of pension she would receive?

    We are still citizens of the UK and are only permanent residents of the US. We are undecided if we are going to move back to the UK, but she is concerned that she is missing out on her pension and the benefits she might be able to receive. If you can provide me any information I would greatly appreciate the help.

    Thank you for your time

    • David Morris says

      Hello Sarah, if she is eligible, she will get back pay from 2016. To be eligible, she needed 10 years of contributions. She may well have that. If you join us, we will send you a complete information package on how to apply

  9. Ian Hamilton says

    Hi David

    I was born in 1967, have 16 years contributions and now live out of the UK. Am I right in thinking that without making any further contributions my pension would be a part pension and if so can you guide me on the % of a full pension I would receive. i.e., 16/35ths?

    Thanks in advance for your advice

    • David Morris says

      Hello Ian, you are correct. For 16 years, you will get 16/35ths of a full pension. Be aware that you can continue to make contributions from abroad, which will increase that. You can also make some catchup payments fro prior years

      • Caroline says

        I was born in the UK and worked between 1976, but not always consistently as I travelled abroad for extended periods during that time also. I live in Canada since 1984 and am 59. Will I be eligible to top up and receive a partial pension

        • David Morris says

          Hello Caroline, yes – you are eligible to make top up back payments to receive a partial pension. Don’t delay though, as you will lose that eligibility over time

  10. Marcel Zahra says

    Hello David
    Would like an answer to one question please.
    Does my Mother Mrs. Helen Yvonne Zahra nee Smith receive a British pension or not.
    She lives in South Africa
    Her DOB is 18th May 1927
    I have been trying to contact her for the last 7 months as she has been in the UK since September 2018 (7months) now and have not been able to contact her.
    If she is still drawing her pension means that she is still alive!
    Many many thanks.
    If you cannot assist who can?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Marcel, you would need to contact the dept of works and pensions in the UK. Unfortunately I cannot help. Good luck

  11. Stuart Stephen says

    I was born in the UK and worked there for 7 years. I emigrated to Australia in 1969. I am 71 years old, am I eligible for an age pension from the U.K?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Stuart, yes – you are eligible for a partial UK state pension. if you join us, we will send you an information package on how to apply for it

      • I am getting a UK State pension of 62 pounds per week for the past 20 years. My pension has been frozen.
        I am thinking of moving back to UK but if for some reasons I decide to come back to Canada will my pension revert to
        62 pounds per week or stays at the current rate but frozen at that rate.
        I don’t want to leave Canada but I can not afford to stay anymore.
        Thank you for good service.

        • David Morris says

          Hello Harold, if you move back permanently to the UK, your pension will be increased to current levels. However, if you then come back to Canada, its not clear what will happen. There are no clear rules for this. It is up to the discretion of the DWP. For your pension to be increased in the UK, it has to be clear that you have moved permanently back. You can’t just go there for a few months

      • Adrian Stevens says

        I was born in England in 1952, and moved to Rhodesia in 1955.
        I then moved back to UK and worked for approx 2 years around 1972, before moving to South Africa – where I live now.
        I’ve retained only UK citizenship but how can I buy back the difference to qualify for a state pension and approx how much will it cost me?

        • David Morris says

          Hi Adrian, unfortunately you need 10 years contributions to get a minimum pension. You may be able to buy back some, but I don’t think you can get to 10.

    • beverley hall says

      I have been paying voluntary contributions in class 2 and plan to continue until I retire . Do I now have to pay the class 3 rate after the changes come in cancelling the class 2

      • David Morris says

        Hello Beverley, once Class 2 gets cancelled, you will have to pay the Class 3 rate. We don’t yet know when that will happen

  12. Paul cowell says

    Hi David
    I am considering changing my citizenship from UK to Singapore.
    I have been living out if the UK for 15years burn do have the qualifying NI contributions from previous employment in the uk

    If I become a singaporean citizen do I give up my state pension rights even though I have contributed ?
    Thanks

  13. Ted Osinski says

    Dear David,
    Your answers are very informative and I have just signed up. My situation is a bit complicated.
    I lived in the UK between 1974-1983. I obtained a status of permanent resident. I worked for 5 years and studied for 4 years (also worked during vacations). I left for US in 1984 where I live now but also have a place in Poland. I hold both US and Polish passports. I will be eligible for UK State Pension on July 6th 2019. I have three questions:
    a) Am I eligible to get UK pension (I am short of 10 years requirement I think)
    b) If so, should I apply for UK pension from Poland (being an EU member) or through US?
    c) Can I make top up payments?
    Please email me any relevant information that might help me.
    Regards
    Ted

    • David Morris says

      Hello Ted, you will need 10 years to qualify, but you can make top up payments, but don’t delay.
      In terms of the EU perspective, I can’t help you. I don’t really know very much about the EU requirements and regulations. Citizenship is irrelevant for UK pension purposes The only thing that matters is the number of contributions

      • Ted Osinski says

        Hi David,
        Are there any regulations or restrictions such as a timeframe for appying or paying top up payments?
        Can I do it later this year, in September 2019, when I am back in Poland and will also visit UK?
        Regards
        Ted

  14. Helga Fear says

    Hi David, my husband is born March 1st, 1950 and receives a partial UK pension. Is it too late to make a payment to increase the pension.

    • David Morris says

      Hi Helga, he may still be able to make a couple of years contributions, but you need to contact the DWP quickly

  15. Helga Fear says

    Hi, my husband receives a small partial UK pension. How do I apply for a B pension? Or will they start that automatically since they have my details on record.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Helga, you will only be entitled to a Class B pension if you reached pension age before April 2016, otherwise you will not be eligible. They changed the rules in 2016. If you are eligible, you must apply. They will not give it automatically

  16. Anne North says

    Hi David
    I was born in 1954 and worked in the U.K for approximately 3-4 years before emigrating to Canada. I just started receiving my Canada Pension
    Am I eligible for a UK pension? and if so what additional contributions would I need to make

    • David Morris says

      Hello Anne, you may still be able to make back payments to get you to the 10 years you need, but you need to act quickly. If you join us, we will send you an information package on how to go about making payments, and how to obtain a pension statement

      • eriic nealon says

        Hi my father,worked in Scotland in 1968 to 1971,watch factory ,he now lives in repulic of lreland ,and is at pension age 71 ,can he claim anything ,could any help with this thanks ,or no any thing about it ,thanks

        • David Morris says

          Hello Eric, yes – your father is entitled to a partial UK pension for any years worked there.
          If you join us, we will send you an information package that explains what to do next

  17. Hi Dave
    Ok I have 12yrs and my wife has 9yrs we plan on topping up wives by a year maybe 2 (class 3) and mine up to as much as we can (class 2), but cannot see on the Gov,uk site and info to the following.
    If I was to pass away before reaching retirement would wife inherit my pension or if I pass away after reaching retirement will she get survivor pension, bit of a morbid question I know but as said I couldn’t see anything on website and if we were to loose it then it might be better to put into RRSP this side.
    Thanks Richard

    • David Morris says

      Hello Richard, your spouse will not inherit any pension, nor receive a survivor pension. She will only receive a pension she has earned in her own right, The law changed in 2016 to eliminate spousal pensions

  18. Patrick Joseph Carolan says

    i am a british citizen living in the usa i have over 30 years of contributions to the uk pensions scheme.my wife is a us citizen would she be eligible for a british pension?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Patrick, it depends on her age. If she reaches pension age after 2016, then she is not entitled to any pension

      • Hi

        In relation to the above question, if this person turned state pension age on November 2016 and she is born and lived in the USA, is she entitled to a state pension in the UK?

        Regards]

        Kihsh

        • David Morris says

          Hello Kihsh, sorry I don’t know which question you are referring to. If you can copy and paste the question, that would help

  19. christinemoreno1983@gmail.com says

    Hi

    I was born in april 1958.

    I lived and worked in the uk for approx 3/4 years.

    I have lived abroad since 1981.(spain)

    I did receive a letter from the government to say that eligible to a pension when l’m 67.

    am l still eligible for this, and how do l find out exactly how many years l did work in the uk

    i am and have contributed in spain for the last 33 yrs, will this affect my pensions

    • David Morris says

      Hello Christine, as yoy live in the Eu, the current rules are that you are entitled to a pension from every country that you worked, including the UK. However, I do not know what Brexit will do to this

  20. Sheryl Gannon Garbacz says

    Hi I would like to find out I was born in London in 1959. Grew up in Northern Rhodesia (now Zambia) presently live in South Africa. I have my Original Birth Certificate and have a British Passport. Am I entitled to a pension or partial pension? My Husband and myself are looking at immigrating to UK. He is Polish and has a Polish Passport

    • David Morris says

      Hello Sheryl, entitlement to a UK pension is based solely on working in the UK.You need 10 years of work credits to qualify. It has nothing to do with citizenship

    • Hi I am now 67 years old retired last July receiving Australian pension should I also apply for British as worked there 15. Years
      Thankyou jenny

      J

      • David Morris says

        Hello Jenny, absolutely. You are entitled to a partial pension from the UK, why not receive it ?
        It will also be backdated to your official pension date

  21. Hi David, it’s Melo here. I live and work in UK since october 2011. I’ve studied for 5 years at an Italian public university to get my degree which I’ve paid 5 years of contributions. I was wondering how, if and when I could claim those 5 years of paid contributions for university studies and convert them for the UK pension calculation?

    Thanks in advance for your time on this.

    Best

    • David Morris says

      Hello Melo, I don’t understand your question. You don’t get pension credits for attending university. You get them through working in the UK

  22. Shawn Patel says

    David, I am a British citizen, worked in England as a college student during all summer holidays.
    After graduation, I worked possibly 2 years before relocating to usa in 1985.
    do I qualify for pension from uk and can I make contributions?
    Thank you

    • David Morris says

      Hello Shawn, you don’t give your age, but you likely need 10 years of work credits to qualify. The good news is that you can continue to contribute to the system from abroad to get you to the 10. You can also make back contributions for 6 missed years

  23. Peggyanne Playdon says

    I live in SA and have been receiving a British Pension,is my husband who was born in South Africa entitled to a Category B British Pension.
    At some stage we plan to move to the UK , what would we then be entitled too. I am 69 and my Husband is 78 .
    Please help.

    PEGGYANNE PLAYDON.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Peggyanne, I’m afraid I can’r be of much help. I am not familiar with all the various programs in the UK. You will continue to receive your pension, and it will be uprated annually for inflation

  24. Dear David,

    Zin here.

    I have worked in the UK since March 2001 up to September 2014.

    I relocated in October 2014.

    Do you think i stand a chance for UK pension? I was born in 1975.

    If yes, what will be the procedures.

    Thank you for your time.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Zin, absolutely, you are entitled to a partial UK pension. You can even increase it by continuing to make contributions from anywhere in the world

  25. K. Collins says

    Hi David,
    I am a dual British Canadian citizen, I was born in 1968 (50 y/o) and left the UK permanently in 1989. I worked on and off form the time I was 15/16 y/o so maybe a maximum of 4 to five years of contributions. I was just reading the NI 38 pdf form and from that I gathered because I have never paid any other class of contributions I would not be eligible to buy the class 3’s at what I believe is a preferred rate until April 5th.

    I am now in the process of filling out the BR 19 application for state pension statement. I know this sounds a little naughty but by sending off the completed NI 38 form before the April 5th deadline would that essentially stop the clock and lock in at a cheaper rate if I sort out where I’m at or am I piddling against the wind here. In other words I would have to buy back other classes of NICs before being allowed to try top up to at least 10 years with class 3’s or am I better of revisiting this drama closer to retirement age?

    Sorry mate, bit of a saga hope my questions make sense, I’m finding the whole thing rather complicated and hard to research.

    Cheers, KC

    • David Morris says

      Hello KC, it is the Class 2’s that are cheaper. The class 3’s are the full rate. You may be eligible for class 2 payments, if you were working in the UK right up until you left, and then worked right away when you came to Canada. The rules aren’t particularly clear. If you join us, we will send you an information package that decribes how you might qualify for Class 2

      • Kee Lang Teo-Macdonald says

        Hi, I’m in the process of the payment part of Class 3 contribution, and I believe the UK gov’t is scraping the Class 2 contribution in April 2019

        • Joe Simpson says

          Yes that seems to be correct about Class 2 being scrapped from this month (April 2019). Glad I purchased 10 years worth of Class 2 for a fraction of the Class 3 cost, about 2 years ago when I reached 65. Am postponing collecting pension until 70 as I’m still working/earning full-time and want to maximize my cashflow when I do pack in work at 70 or thereabouts. Ditto with my CPP here in Canada, and OAS.

  26. Hi David
    I worked in UK for period 1998-1999. Then worked on QE2 Cunard Line for period 1999 – 2001. Born in 1975.
    Is there anything I can do to obtain pension?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Kylee, yes – you should be able to make contributions to get you to the minimum 10 years you will need. If you join us, we can tell you how to get a pension statement, and make contributions from abroad

  27. Patrick Chukwu says

    Hi David, I came to study in the UK in October, 2001. I completed my program in July 2002, and started working with an agency and making the necessary contributions. I left the UK in October 2002, but came back April 2003. I worked full time hours from April 2003 until September 2006, when I started another study in the UK. While studying, I was doing part time work but when I completed my program in November 2007 and started work immediately. I worked until October 2009, when I relocated to Canada.

    With the details above, do I stand any chance of getting UK pension? And, if so, what do I have to do to be fully qualified?

    Regards,

    • David Morris says

      Hello Patrick, you will need 10 years to qualify. The good news is that you can continue to make those contributions from Canada. If you join us, we will send you an information package on how to get your pension statement, and how to make contributions from abroad

  28. Colin Sayers says

    Dear David. I was born in Belfast in 1954 Sept. I was in the UK in 76 doing odd jobs, again in 82 odd jobs/dole till 1986. from 1986-91 studied at UK universities. Worked full time till Aug 94, left UK again. Am i entitled to any benefit? Thanks Colin Sayers.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Colin, you will need 10 years to qualify. Its hard to tell exactly how many years credit you have. It is less than 10, but may be 5 or 6. The good news is that you can still make some back payments that may get you to 10. Don’t delay though, as you will lose these years as time goes on. If you join us, we will tell you what to do next

  29. Mihail Veselinov Mihaylov says

    Hello David ,

    My name is Mihail Mihaylov born in Bulgaria 1963.I have worked full time in UK since 2006 till now- 2019.

    I have paid National Insurance Contributions for a certain minimum number of years-12 year now.I don’t have british passport, only permenant leave to remain .

    My home country is EEA member since 2007. My question bassicaly is if I’m eligible for the UK state pension, then it can be paid to me in a country outside the UK?

    Thanks for your time and consideration.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Mihail, yes your UK pension will be paid anywhere in the world.

      • Hi David,

        My friend is an EU citizen. He was born in the year 1954 and has never worked in the UK so does not have any NI contributions. If he decides to live and work in the UK now will he be eligible for a pension after 10 years of work and subsequent NI contributions?

        Looking forward to your advice.

        Thank you.

        • David Morris says

          Hello JD, yes. The only eligibility criteria for a pension is that you make contributions to the NI system

  30. Richard Murison says

    I worked 12 years in the UK, my wife worked 5. We are both still working in Canada, and will reach 66 in 2021. It looks like I will qualify for a Category A pension, and my wife for a Category B. From what it says here, it looks like I could pay a voluntary contribution of £700 for each of the 23 years needed to bring my contributions up to the 35 year maximum, after which I would receive a full Category A pension, and my wife a full Category B pension (of perhaps 60% of the Category A amount). This looks like a good plan to me. Have I got it right?

    However, I am interested in the Class 2 Voluntary contributions for people who are still working, which expires in April. Would this apply to my wife and I, who are both still working in Canada?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Richard, you can generally only go back 6 years in terms of making back payments. You can make payments going forward until you reach pension age. You would not be able to make payments for the 23 years you missed,only 6. There is no longer any such thing as a Category B pension. Your wife will have to qualify for her own pension based on her own contribution record. She will also be able to make 6 catchup payments.
      Yes, you may qualify for making Class 2, although the rules are not hard and fast.
      If you join us, we will send you information on how to make back payments, and potentially qualify for Class 2

  31. Ana Robustelli says

    Hello David, I am a british citizen. Born the 21/04/61. I have been working in London, from April 2002 until June 2012 (year that I left UK) with some gaps in betwen. Always in private education sector with young children and adolescents. Am I entitled to make voluntary NI payments from now until I reach the 10 years minimum to get the pension? Many thanks

    • David Morris says

      Hello Ana, yes, you are certainly entitled to make those contributions. You can even make up to 6 catchup payments, as well as ongoing payments until you reach pension age

  32. Estela Hunt says

    Hi David Morris
    My name is Estela Hunt , 61 years old, I’m a naturalised British citizen, moved to the USA 3 years ago. I worked full time in UK since 1984 to 1986 then temporarily stopped working to care for my child for 7 years. Then back on full time employment in 1993 to August 2015, is the 7 years caring for my child counted to my years of working for a UK pension eligibility.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Estela, the 7 years child caring should count towards contributions. Looks like you have the minimum needed to qualify for a partial pension as well.

  33. Linda Reed nee Chrisp says

    Dear David, hi I’m Linda Reed, was born April 1954 worked from 1969 untill I emigrated to Australia in 1979..When can I look onto getting a part pension. Thanking you.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Linda, you will reach pension age in September of this year. At that point you are eligible to apply for your pension

  34. Hello David

    I am a former foreign worker in London but now I am living in my country. I have worked for 4 years . Am I eligible to a partial pension ?

    Thanks for answering me

    • David Morris says

      Hello Farid, you will need 10 years to qualify for a minimum pension. The good news is that you can continue to contribute from abroad. Find out how by joining us.

  35. sandeep dalal says

    i was i uk (london) on a student visa for 3 yrs (2005-2008). There i was working part time with Royal mai Post office and i use to get the offical salary slip in which my pension was getting deducted.

    I left the country in 2008. So can i withdraw the pension which i was getting ? if yes the what is the process for the same. Pls. help.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Sandeep, no you cannot withdraw any pension contributions. The best you can do is continue to contribute from abroad, which will entitle you to a pension once you reach pension age

  36. I have 28 qualifying years to April 2019 and pay Class 2 contributions. I qualify for a pension on Jan 22 2021 and would like to get up to 30 qualifying years.
    Can I pay Class 2 contributions for the years ending April 2020 and April 2021?
    If Class 2 contributions cannot be paid for these years, can I (should I?) pay another Class for these years?
    I see that now you need 35 qualifying years to get a full pension – do I get caught in that I or will I still be assessed under the previous 30 qualifying years since I am so close now to get the pension?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Lewis, if you are fully caught up, you cannot make further contributions in the year you reach pension age. That means you can only contribute for 2020. You should be able to make Class 2 for that

  37. John Murphy says

    Dear David ,

    I am currently living in Ireland but was born in London and worked many years in the UK. I worked in the UK from 1976 to 1979 and in the year 2000. I then worked in the UK between 2005 and 2010. I am currently 59 but if i am still here when i reach the age of 65 do i qualify for a UK pension?

    • David Morris says

      Hello John, current rules under the EU would give you credit for all years worked in the UK. Not sure what happens after Brexit. You need 10 years to qualify for a UK pension under UK rules, which is payable anywhere. Sounds like you have close to 10 already. You have the option of making additional contributions towards the UK pension which should get you to 10

  38. Linda Willis says

    Hello – I was born in November 1951 and worked part time and full time in the UK for maybe a total of 5 years. I worked in Germany for 4 years. I am now 68 and retired in the US. Am I eligible for any type of UK pension.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Linda, you only needed 1 year of work in the UK to qualify, so yes, you are entitled to a partial UK pension, which would be backdated to 2013. You may also still be able to make catch up paymenmts for a couple of years. If you join us, we will send you a complete information package on what to do next

  39. Dear David,

    My brother is naturalized British born on May 1965, and he is working in UK since 1989 till present have payed his NI since than.
    My questions is if he is eligible for early pension?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Daniela, no, it is not possible to claim an early pension. The UK state pension is payable only once you reach pension age

  40. John James says

    Hi David.

    I am currently living in the USA but have dual UK/USA citizenship.

    I’m not sure how long I worked in the UK but did spend 5 years in the RAF in the 70’s. I am 60 y/o now. I know I have less than 10 years worth of contributions.

    I would like to know how to find out how many years of contributions I actually have and what it would cost me to make voluntary contributions to reach eligibility.

    Thank you for your time.

  41. Hi David, i am born on 02/07/50.I worked in UK since 04/1973, in NHS, until May 2008 and had 10 years MHO status too.I started receiving the state pension after 2 years defferement.

    I am hoping to return to full time employment, for 2-3 years.

    If i defer my state pension, for two years, wld you know, how extra pension i cld get?

    Or is there a more effective route i cld increase my pension in the 2-3 years, more i work.

    In my new job, my salary wld b in region of £34-36,000

    My current combined occupational and state pension is £25,100

    Thank You

    • David Morris says

      Hello Ray, I am afraid I don’t know the answer to that. You would really need to contact the Dept of Works and Pensions.

  42. Ronald Hilton Berry says

    Hello David I am duel South African / British and 67 years of age born 1952 only arrived in the UK recently I have a NIN but no contributions as yet can I contribute voluntarily going forward until I have the 10 years required to be eligible or how would it work

    • David Morris says

      Hello Ronald, you would need to work for 10 years to qualify. You cannot make voluntary contributions past your pension age

  43. Ray Rankin says

    I am a Canadian permanent Resident and a uk citizen. I worked and paid taxes etc for a period of approx 7 years before i moved here. I am approaching 63 years of age and wondering if there is any form of pension i can receive from the uk,
    if not ,can i pay into something in order to get the minimum 10 years requirement

    • David Morris says

      Hello Ray, yes, you can make voluntary contributions until you reach pension age, plus buyback at least 6 years. That should get you at least the minimum, or more. If you join us we will send you an information package on how to do that. Don’t delay, because you lose the ability to make back payments as time goes on

  44. My husband was born on 25/1943. I was born in 1950 and started working in Saturdays and in the school holidays at the Kings land Variety Stores both in Belfast and Bangor, Northern Ireland. when I left school I worked at the Belfast Co-operative Society for three years and then Joined the Woman’s royal Air force were I worked for over 3 years. My husband joined the R.A.F in 1961 husband was posted to the then West Germany with the R.A.F.I gave birth to two children. the first on 27/1/1971 and the second on 12/3/1973 which I stayed home to look after. My husband and I then migrated to New Zealand on.3/10/1973 as the end of his ” career” in the Air Force as he was unable to extend his duty as it was (age for Rank). Prior to this my husband worked on Hall Farm in Little Casterton, Rutalnd
    We returned on 16/12/1988 . My youngest child was then 16 and attended school. I was employed by the British home office and then by Monk’s Regional Office in Stamford in Lincolnshire until the end of beginning of 1990. My Husband worked at at Trade Agency as he did not want to communicate to London
    Taking all the employment and Child care into consideration plus Serving in H.M.Forces we believe we qualify for the U.K. pension

    As New Zealand has a receptacle agreement with Great Britain I assume we qualify for the full pension

    Please advise our entitlement for the

    we

    • David Morris says

      Hello Sharyn, if you live in the UK, the best bet is for you to contact the local office of the Dept of Works and Pensions. They will have your exact eligibility on file. This website focuses on expats living abroad

  45. Dear David,

    I was born in 1977 and am an Australian citizen (soon to be a dual Australian/British citizen). I have lived and worked in the UK since 2004 and have paid NI contributions for 15+ years. My deceased husband (born 1974) was a UK Citizen and made NI contributions for over 20+ years. I am considering returning back to Australia before retirement age. I have 2 questions: 1. Do I automatically inherit my deceased husband pension years? (assuming of course I never remarry).
    2. Should I make additional contributions now to top up my NI years to the full 35 years (in case I remarry or move back to Australia)?

    • David Morris says

      Hello N.E. you cannot inherit any state pension from your husband. You can only earn a state pension from your own contributions. Yes, you should make additional contributions to get the maximum pension. It is a good deal financially

  46. Patricia Meredith says

    Hello, I moved to the U.K. in January 2009 from South Africa and worked continuously for 9.5 years. I recently moved to Germany. Am I eligible for a UK pension with just short of 10 years contributions? If not, would I be able to make any payment to make up for the 6 months shortfall?

    Thank you
    Patricia

    • David Morris says

      Hello Patricia, under current EU rules, you will get credit for every year worked in the UK. I do not know what will happen after Brexit. It may be wise to make additional contributions to the UK system to get you to 10 years

    • David Morris says

      Hello Patricia, you may have already reached the 10 years, as partial years can be counted, provided the annual NI contribution amount was made. If not, you can certainly make a voluntary contribution

    • Virginia Shongwe says

      I am a South African. Born in 1961.Worked in UK from March 2004 To September 2009.I am now back in South Africa. Do I qualify for a UK state pension?

      • David Morris says

        Hello Virginia, you need 10 years of contributions to qualify, so at the moment you are not eligible. The good news is that you can continue to make contributions from abroad to get you to the minimum 10 years, or more

  47. Zahra Alishaei says

    My husband is a british citizen and has worked in the UK for some years. He is 63 now. And we don’t live in the UK and he hasn’t been in the UK for about 14 years . Is he eligible for having a pension ? If yes what should he do to ask for a pension?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Zahra, he will need 10 years of work contributions to qualify for a minimum pension. The good news is that he can continue to make contributions from abroad, even if he has been away for years. If you join us, we will send you an information package on how to go about making voluntary contributions

  48. Good day

    Please can you advise?

    My mother was born and raised in the UK however has lived in South Africa for 34 years. She is now retired and wishes to return home. We have been advised that she needs her National Security Number. Now we not sure if she would still have one or does she apply for a new one?

    If she still has one where and how do we obtain it?

    Thank you

    • David Morris says

      Hello Tallulah, I assume you mean the National Insurance number. I am not aware of a National Security number. You can write to the Dept of Works and Pensions in the UK, giving your mothers last address and last place of work in the UK. They will be able to provide her National Insurance Number.

  49. Kris Hough says

    Hi
    I am a Canadian who worked in the UK for 5 years between 2013-2018. I have recently immigrated to Australia. I would like to top up to 10 years before the current Class 2 rates are phased – is that at all possible? I only moved to the UK in 2013 so can I purchase for future years at the lower Class 2 rate?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Kris, you can not buy back any years prior to the first year you worked in the UK. You can make contributions going forward each year. You can certainly apply for the right to make Class 2 payments going forward until such time as they cancel them

  50. Hi,

    I am a Japanese woman married to an Irish citizen. My husband paid NI contributions for 20 years+ (high tax bracket). And I have never worked in the uk, as I looked after my children and was a stay at home mother. Would I be eligible for a pension? And also would I be eligible if my husband and I moved to Ireland?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Coculin, you would only be eligible for a UK pension based on your own actual work contributions in the UK. There is no such thing as a spousal pension any longer.

  51. Terry Siggers says

    Hi, I am a British / Australian dual citizen and worked in the UK from 1968 (when I left School) till 1980 (when I emigrated to Australia. I am now 66 years of age and still working full time in OZ. Am I eligible for a UK pension even though I am still working?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Terry, yes, your eligibility for the UK state pension is based solely on reaching the approved pension age. You do not have to have stopped working

  52. Giedrius austrevicius says

    Hello, my name Giedrius I’m lithuanian, I worked in UK from 05/2004 till 08/ 2015, then i left UK and went back home, will i get UK pension, what i need to do, do i have to register or tell someone? I’m 38 years old.

    Regards Giedrius

    • David Morris says

      Hello Giedrius, yes, you have reached the minimum number of years to qualify for a UK pension (10). You cannot apply until you reach pension age though. In the meantime, you can continue to make additional voluntary contributions from abroad, which will increase your pension

  53. Hello, my husband is south African living and working in UK for the past 20 yrs. He still holds a SA passport with a indefinite leave to remain stamp in it from the Home Office. He has another 13 yrs of working until pension age. Do you know if he can still get a British pension if he is not yet a British citizen, He does pay in all his contributions. Thanks

    • David Morris says

      Hello Angela, he does not need to be a UK citizen to receive a UK pension. All he needs is the work contributions, which he is making

  54. Dear David,

    I was born in 1961 and worked in the UK from 1978 to 1980. I then moved to the U.S. where I have resided since. Question, my divorced father who lived and worked his entire life in the UK died when he was 48. What would of happened to his Government pension? As his only child should I of made a claim? Also my Mother who divorced my Dad in 1970 died in the U.S. when she was 48 in 1989. Same question as she worked in U.K. from 1959 to 1980. Should I have claimed her pension? Last question, I do not know my NI number as I was just a teenager when I worked in the UK almost 40 years ago. Can I contribute and get a basic pension? Thank you!

    • David Morris says

      Hello Darryl, you can not claim any Government pension from either of your parents. You should be able to claim a pension in your own right, though, by making voluntary payments from abroad to get you to at least the minimum level, or more. If you join us, we will send you an information package on how to find out your NI number, and make contributions from abroad

  55. Mah Wai Ling says

    Dear David

    I am Mah Wai Ling born in 1955. I am a Malaysian working as a nurse in UK fro 1975 till 1979 .
    Am I entitle for the pension? I I only have my UK hospital certificates with me as I lost my NS registration number.
    Please advised who to write to in order to trace the NS registration..

    Thank you and hope to hear from you soon .

    Regards
    Mah Wai Ling .

    • David Morris says

      Hello Mah Wai, you will need 10 years of contributions to qualify for a UK pension. You can make voluntary contributions from abroad to get you to the 10. If you join us, we will send you an information package on how to do that

  56. janet puckett says

    i was born in 1948 left school at 15 had a few jobs joined the wrns in 67 to1970 camt to America in 1973 can I claim

    • David Morris says

      Hello Janet. You need 10 years of working in the UK to be eligible. If you have that, you would be eligible

    • Brenda Nicholls says

      I was born in the UK in 1943. My working years were from 1959 to 1964. I have an Australian passport. Am I entitled to a pension if I could top up my contributions at the Cheaper 2 rate?

      • David Morris says

        Hello Brenda, you needed 10 years of work contributions. Unfortunately, it is now too late to make any top up payments. Sorry

  57. Susan Ball says

    I am a female Australian citizen with a dual passport (Aust/EU). DOB 4/10/55. I worked in the UK from 1997-2004 (seven years) and wondered if I was eligible for a UK part pension.
    Although I fear based, on the following, that I may not be eligible, I wondered whether, also being a carer for my daughter, Anna, who had a disability whilst I worked/lived in the UK for that period, would make a difference to my eligibility. Sadly, Anna passed away on 16 April 2015 in Australia.
    ‘women born on or after 6th April 1953
    The pension age for men in this age group is steadily increasing, starting at 65 for men and 63 for women.
    People in this group reach pension age on or after 6th April 2016, and will need a minimum of 10 years’ National Insurance contributions. 35 years are needed to get a full pension of about £160 per week. Also you can make a minimum of 10 voluntary payments to top up your pension contributions.’
    I look forward to hearing from you.

    Warm regards
    Susan Ball

    • David Morris says

      Hello Susan, yes, you will need 10 years. It is very possible that you may be able to get credit for the time you spent caring for your daughter. You can also make contributions fropm abroad to get you to the minimum you need. If you join us, we will send you an information package on how to do that

  58. Liz Taylor says

    Hi David

    I was born 4th January 1950 and worked from July 1966 until emigrating to Canada in September 1975.

    I am reading the info to mean I do not qualify for any UK pension (because of my birthday).

    Am I understanding it correctly?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Liz, you needed 10 years to qualify. You might actually have 10 years, as they don’t have to be full years working. It is certainly worth pursuing.
      If you join us, we will send you an information package on how to find out your pension status.

      • Liz Taylor says

        Thanks so much David..

        I most certainly will be joining.

        That is great news if it does mean that working 6 months in 1966 and 9 months in 1975 is considered 10 years.

        Thanks for this service. I still have letters from 70’s that my mum had sent/received regarding the pension not changing from the date of emigration. Sad to know it is still in place 🙁

        I’m presuming it is fairly straightforward finding my National Insurance number If not, I will be in touch after I have joined 🙂 I may still have some documents (including my ration book for my orange juice and cod liver oil) some of which may have the number on.

        I appreciate the help and info, thanks!

  59. Doris Bridger says

    My son has been living abroad for about 20 years. He has a National Insurance number and was born in 1958. He would like to know if he is eligible for a UK person and how he can apply.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Doris. I need more information. Did he work in the UK at all ?
      He will likely still be able to make voluntary contributions from abroad, so there is a strong chance he can be eligible for a UK pension

  60. Olga Mc Callig says

    Hi, I was born in Ireland 1964. Did my nurse training for 3.4 years and worked as a staff RN for 8 months. I then moved to the UK, did my Midwifery training for 18 months and then worked as a staff midwife for 10 months. During my training in both countries I was paid so I paid tax and social contributions.
    I then worked in USA for 2 years, Worked full time in Belgium for 20 years and now live in Canada since 2011 and currently working Full time.

    Is it worth me contributing to a UK pension.

    Thanks

    Olga

    • David Morris says

      Hello Olga, it is certainly worthwhile financially to contribute to the UK system, to qualify for a UK pension. You may also be eligible for a EU pension, for all the time you were working in EU countries. I am not an expert in EU pensions. You would need to contact the pension offices in the UK and Belgium

  61. James Desouza says

    Hi David,

    I was born May 10th 1964. I am planning o apply for a British passport as I was Born in Nairobi Kenya and my dad was naturalized Jan 12 1962.

    In case I get through with my British passport around 60 years and work for around 5 years till I am 65, can I purchase the other 5 years to entitle me for pension?

    If yes what would be the cost per year and how many years can I purchase.

    Thank you in advance

    • David Morris says

      Hello James, I believe you can only make catchup payments for those years where you were eligible to make payments. To be eligible, you needed to have a National Insurance number, which is only given once you start work. Note that it has nothing to do with citizenship.In your case, once you start work, you will be eligible to contribute going forward, but you will not be eligible to make payments for previous years, as you did not have a National insurance number during those years

  62. Thomas Hill says

    HI

    I worked 12 years in the UK from 1999 to 2011 and contributed to National Insurance for the full 12 year period. I emigrated to Canada in 2011 and now reside there. I am a British/ Canadian Dual citizen. How can i contribute to the pension system in the UK to ensure that i receive a pension when i eventually retire and turn the eligible age to draw a pension, what ever age that is at that time.
    I am 37 years old at present.
    Am i even eligible to pay into the system??

    • David Morris says

      Hello Thomas, yes to all of the above. You are already eligible now for a pension when you reach pension age, and you can continue to contribute each year until you reach pension age. This would qualify you for a full UK pension.
      If you join us, we will send you a complete information package on how to get started

  63. Mohammad Moghal says

    Hello Mr. David Morris,
    Read your very informative replies which has prompted me to ask the following.
    After migrating to the UK I started paying Class I National Insurance contributions in 1974 as an employed person and became self employed in 1982-83 and paid class II self employed contributions until 1991-1992 in the UK when I returned to my country of origin and continued my self employment in that Asian country and continued to pay my self employed class II contributions into the UK state pension until my date of retirement in 2013.( Date of birth 1948)
    Decided to defer in order to obtain lum sum payment and now claim. My record shows full 36 years of contributions/credits with 3 other years with some shortfall in contributions.

    I understand you only need 30 years of contributions to be eligible for a full UK pension, will it be worth paying an amount of over 1000 pounds which might not count or will it be counted towards any additional/second state pension for extra years.
    Secondly since I live abroad and perhaps not entitled to annual increases, what will be the pension rate applicable, my date of retirement, date of claim or the date when the pension service decides my claim?
    Will be highly obliged for the answer which other on this forum might find helpful. Thanks

    • David Morris says

      Hello Mohammad, yes, you only need 30 years for a full pension. Once you reach 65, you can no longer contribute going forward. There would be no point anyway, since you already have the maximum. Making additional contributions would be a waste of money.
      In terms of what you get, if you reached pension age prior to April 2016, the deferment increase is roughly 10% per year on the base pension, which you can opt to receive as a lump sum, or additional monthly payments. The base pension amount will be the amount in force in the year you claim the pension. After that, depending on where you live, the pension amount will not increase

  64. Hello,
    We are British citizens living in Canada since 2006.
    I was born in 1965 and have 10 years of national insurance contributions at least as well as 14 years of child benefits which overlap with some of those years.
    My husband was born in 1961 and worked as an employee for about 8 years but then was self-employed for about 20 years.
    Are either of us entitled to a UK pension and, if so, at what age would we be able to claim.
    I know we are early, but I like to be prepared!

    • David Morris says

      Its very smart of you to be looking at pension issues now. Most people leave it too late, so congratulations.
      It sounds like you are already eligible, and your husband will be if he made National Insurance contributions while self employed. In any event, you both are eligible to make additional NI Payments from abroad, that will increase your pension amount.
      You can see your pension age by following this link, and entering in the appropriate information. https://www.gov.uk/state-pension-age/y/age
      If you join us, we will send you a complete package of information on how to make payments from abroad, and also apply for a pension statement from the UK

  65. SABRINA LAITINEN says

    My Dad is 87 and is a British Citizen living in Canada, he worked in England and was part of the National Guard fo several years before immigrating with his British wife to Canada in 1957. I sit too late to make a claim? What does he need to do and can eligible benefits be backdated that far? Thank you

    • David Morris says

      Hello Sabrina, your father would need 11 years of contributions to the pension system to be eligible for anything. It sounds like he does not have that, and it is too late to buy back any years now. Sorry

  66. Michele Weatherhead says

    If I was born in the UK and only worked on and off for a short period ( about 3 years) before leaving the UK, would I be entitled to any type of pension? I am to retire in a non-EU country.

  67. I am a British/Canadian national. If you have less than 10 years of contributions in the UK (for example three), but have more in Canada (e.g. nine), based on the SSA, would you qualify for the 10 year minimum in the Uk?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Joshie, it is complicated, but the short answer is no. If you had lived in the UK in the most recent last 10 years, it is possible that contributions to the Canadian pension scheme could be classified as contributions to the UK system, but they then would not count towards the Canadian system.
      In other words contributions towards a Canadian pension can’t also count as contributions to the UK

  68. Marie Cartwright says

    Hello, already receive a small state pension from UK. I live in the EU and may need to renounce my British citizenship in order to remain in my country of choice. Does renouncing citizenship affect my state pension

  69. AHMED MEHMOOD says

    hello Mr DAVID MORRIS, Sir i born in 10.03.1953 i am italian nationl i entered in uk 2014. i am working from april 2017. i just want to know if i will be able to get pension in future ,when and how much? thankyou sir

    • David Morris says

      Hello Ahmed, as you are in the EU, your pension rights come under EU rules. I am not familiar with those, but in general, every year you work in the UK counts towards a pension

  70. David Morris says

    Hello Nigel, yes, she will be entitled to a partial UK pension. Eligibility has nothing to do with citizenship, only contributions matter

  71. maria.kousoulou says

    hi im maria I have worked since I was 14 yrs old born 1955 can I retire at 63 if so how do I apply please? dob 02/ii/55

  72. Gerry Arthurs says

    Hello David, My wife has asked me to ask you a question. She reached state pension in October 2015 at age 63 and 3 months, she was born in June 1952. She believes she had accrued 41 years stamps, but believes she is getting less pension than she ought to. Do you know how much she should be getting.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Gerry, if she is entitled to the full state pension in 2015, then she should be getting approx. 116 pounds a week.

  73. Adam Brown says

    Dear David,
    I was born in 1962 and have worked for the last 26 years in Italy, having accumulated 9 years of contrinbutions in the UK. Can I now pay for the 10th year, and if so, does it matter when I do this, so long as it is before I retire?
    Also, is there any sense in paying for more than 10 years?
    Thanks
    Adam Brown

    • David Morris says

      Hello Adam, as you are in the EU, the rules are different. You do not need the 10 year minimum for the UK pension. All years in any EU country towards the final pension. Having said that, I am not familiar with all the detailed EU harmonization rules. You may not be able to make contributions to the UK pension while working in another EU country

  74. Husain Salwati says

    I have worked in UK from Dec. 2004 to July 2018 and paid state National Insurance contributions for these 13.5 years. Now I have moved to Canada. Is there any possibility of moving this UK state pension to Canada ?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Husain, the state pension can not be moved, but it can be paid in Canada. You are certainly eligible, and can continue to make payments from Canada which will increase your pension

  75. Hi, my dad was born (01 03 1943) in Wales and then resided in Scotland where he did apprenticeships for 2 years. He relocated to South Africa where he has been for the past 40 years. How long would he have to work for back in the UK to have access to the state pension?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Chislett, he would need 11 years of contributions to qualify. At this point, he can not make back contributions, so he would have to work the full number of years less any credits for his apprenticeship

  76. Roshan Bharaj says

    Hey there,

    Read above information about the UK pension and wondering if I would qualify to a partial one. I worked in the Midland for a city council from 1985 to the end of 1991; for about 6 and half years. I now live in British Columbia and have lived and worked here since 1992 after immigrating from England. I will qualify to Canadian pension upon turning 65 next August and wondering if I would be entitled to a partial British pension too.

    I understand that I could make voluntary contributions to national insurance to make up for 10 years. I am wondering how much that contributions will be and if contributions are payable annually or a one time payment for remaining of 10 years for my particular scenario be acceptable.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Roshan, you will need 10 years of contributions to get a minimum pension. You can make some back contributions for years missed, and those can be paid in a one time payment. It is certainly worth pursuing

  77. I was born in UK 1958 . I commenced work 1974 then I migrated to Australia 1981 My family returned to the UK 1996 where I work again however returned to live in Australia 1988

    Would I be entitled to a UK pension ?

    Thanks

    • David Morris says

      Hello Brian, you will need 10 years of credits to qualify. The good news is that you can continue to make voluntary payments from Australia to make up any shortfall. If you join us, we will send you a complete information package on how to determine how many years you have, and how to make payments from abroad

  78. Hello David
    I was born in August 1954 and will be eligible for UK pension in 2020.
    I’ve been living in Australia for 15+ years, but worked many years in the UK. It says I have made 31 years of contributions.
    Last time I checked I was short of the full pension by around 20 pounds per week.
    Can I still make voluntary contributions of 4 years to get the maximum pension? Can I just choose the cheapest (oldest) 4 years?
    Thanks

    • David Morris says

      Hi Vivienne, absolutely you can make voluntary contributions for the 4 missing years. Yes, you can choose the oldest 4 missing years.

  79. Hi

    I now live in the US and am an english nationaL. I worked in England for 20years before immigrating. I’m only 38 but in the future when retirement age kicks in would I be entitled to a pension, I was employed and contributed NI for those years.

    Many thanks

    • David Morris says

      Hello Guy, yes you will be entitled to a partial pension based on the credits you already have. You can also continue to make voluntary payments to get you to the maximum of 35 years, which will get you the full pension

  80. Hello David,

    I am a US Citizen who lived and worked in the UK (1984-1999), paying National Insurance (I have my NI number) for at least 15 years. I moved back to the US in 2000 and live there now. I was born in 1954. Am I entitled to any benefits for paying contributions for that long? I tried to find info on the government site and tried to register but got stopped when they required a UK address.

    Thank you for any help &/or info you can provide.
    Clive

  81. Hello

    I am 52 years old. I was born in England. I worked for 3 years in England (from age 17 to 20) and then emigrated to Canada where I worked from 1989 to 2015. I have now returned to England and have been working here for 3 years so far. Am I eligible for a British and or Canadian pension. thank you

    • David Morris says

      Hello Sharon, you would be eligible for pensions from both the UK and Canada when you reach pension age. At 52, you are not there yet

    • Pamela Spencer says

      Good morning I would like more information about British pensions, I worked part time for 1 year and full time for 8 years between 1975 – 1984 before leaving to live in Canada.
      Thanks in advance

      • David Morris says

        Hello Pamela, not sure what more information you are looking for. Depending on your age, you will need 10 years of contributions to qualify for a minimum pension. You may also be able to make additional voluntary contributions which will increase your pension. If you join us, we will send you a complete information package on what to do next, and how to make voluntary contributions from Canada

    • My husband and I receive a small pension from Scotland. When he received his American pension they deducted his small pension off his US pension. We thought we would get his small pension from Scotland plus his US pension. Both were social security pensions. Thankyou

      • David Morris says

        Hello Helen, they would not have deducted his entire Scottish pension from the US pension, however they do reduce the amount of the US pension by a percentage of the Scottish pension amount. It is generally around $50 deduction from the US amount for every $100 of foreign pension, but that varies according to a complicated formuula

  82. Nolleen Lyall says

    HI, my mom in law was born in South Africa but has a british passport, is she eligible for any pension or medicare in Australia and she is in Australia for a while. – Thanks

    • David Morris says

      Hello Nolleen, I can’t comment on the rules in Australia about their pension system. She would not be eligible for any UK pension if she did not work in the UK

  83. Jillian Oliver says

    Hi my Mum was born in Ireland in 1942 she then come to the UK trained as a nurse and worked for about 6 years contributing to the national insurance she then moved to South Africa she still receives a small pension overseas. She wants to return to the UK with my dad who has never worked or lived in the UK but has an irish passport. Would she be entitled to a UK pension or could she pay into pension to top it up, thanks Jillian

    • David Morris says

      Hello Jillian, she needs 10 years of contributions to qualify for a partial UK pension. It doesn’t look like she has thaat, but it would never hurt to enquire. It is too late for her to top up any missing years

  84. Andrew Pratt says

    Hi,

    I worked in UK in the 2000s and I have recently received a formal letter from the proper gov dept (I forget the name now) summarising my NI contributions as totalling 9 years contributions. I need to make at least the 10th year’s contribution to ensure I get something on retirement. I’ll probably make additional contributions in due course. My question now is: which class of contribution do I make for the 10th year? All I know is that Class 2 is cheaper so on the surface I should opt for Class 2 but will it affect the ultimate amount I am entitled to and what crieria do I need to meet to ensure Class 2 is the correct one? I don’t want to screw this up. Help appreciated.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Andrew, the contribution class does not affect the amount of pension you receive in any way. They all count equally towards the pension amount. Class 2 is the way to go, but the UK is eliminating Class 2 from 2019 onwards. You may still be able to make Class 2 payments for years up to 2019

  85. The Frozen Pension issue was discussed on the BBC radio show on August 10, 2018:

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0bd6ygj

  86. Hi David,

    I worked 2 years in Jersey before i moved to UK in 2004, can this time in Jersey be added to my pension as working years?

    Regards
    Beata

    • David Morris says

      Hi Beata, I do not know the answer to that. You would need to check with your local DWP office in the UK

  87. Anandlall Parsunoo says

    Hi I worked for seven years only in the UK and contributed for the NI.
    I want to know if I can b eligible for the state pension or can I contribute for the remaining years?
    Pls let me know n thanks a lot.

  88. Susan Hawkesworth says

    Hi David, I was born in the UK on 23/5/1959 and emigrated to Australia with my parents when I was 2 yrs old but I am looking at moving back to England or Scotland within the next 12 months. My question is if when I move back and hopefully work for the next 5yrs what sort of pension would I be entitled to and can I top up whilst I am living in the UK? Thank you for any information you can provide.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Susan, you will not be able to top up, as you currently are not eligible for a UK pension. If you move to the UL and work there, you can build eligibility, but you cannot buy back previous years. Your pension amount is simply prorated based on the number of years worked. Foreach year you work, you will be entitled to 1/35th of the full pension at the time you reach pension age

  89. Josephine Rogers says

    Dear David

    My name is Josephine Rogers an S.A citizen. I was married to a British citizen, we located from Germany where we met to
    S.A because he fell in love with Cape Town to cut a long story short, my husband passed away on the 8th Feb. 2017 My deceased husband date of birth 29th Dec. 1951 He had 13 working years and 6 years Apprenticeship in the UK then he moved to Germany worked there and also was self employed. My question to you is am I entitled to a portion etc. of his . pension? his also got a NI number if yes how do I go about it, will highly be appreciated My date of birth 29.03.1954

    Thank you very much
    Josephine

    • David Morris says

      Hello Josephine, unfortunately no, you would not be entitled to any portion of his pension. The law changed in 2016, so you would have to have earned a pension in your own right

  90. Lorraine Elizabeth Armstrong says

    Hi,
    I worked in the UK for 4 years before moving to USA. I would dearly love to move back home and am looking into the possibilities. Would I be entitled to a pension if I back pay 6 years? I also have a few working years left in me so that is another possibility of moving home sooner rather than later. Please send me whatever info you have. Thank you.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Lorraine, yes, you can make back payments to get you to the required 10 years. If you join us, we will send you a complete peckage of information on what to do next, including how to make voluntary payments from broad

  91. Hi, I`m confused… I`ve worked for 7 seven years in UK… I logged in to my personal tax account I checked NI record and it says “summary: 10 full years” my estimate is about 51 pounds a week why it is counted as 10 years if I worked only 7????

    • David Morris says

      hello Thomas, you may have received credits under certain circumstances. If the Government says you have 10 years credit, I would just accept it

  92. Gurmit Singh Purewal says

    Hello I am a British Citizen and worked in the UK and have 135 contributions to my credit before 1975. i retired in 1993, and had initiated my Deferred pension claim in 2016. Was I eligible for a proportionate reduced pension in 1993?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Gurmit, if you applied for a deferred pension in 2016, then it would take into account all prior years.
      You cannot have had 135 contributions, as it is an annual contribution eligibility.

      • Gurmit Purewal says

        Hi David, let me clarify. I am a British citizen, and started working in 1956 to 1959, for three years consecutively. The work and pensions department confirms this and has translated 3 qualifying years to 150 contributions. Post 1959 I moved to India. I put in a claim for deferred pension in 2016, however, The department insists that as law has changed I need 10 qualifying years or 25% for a reduced pension and three years is not enough. My question is that as I fulfill the first contribution condition and have more than 50 contributions, I should be elegible for a reduced pension? Please do clarify on this. Thanks.

      • Gurmit Singh Purewal says

        Dear David
        My Date of Birth is 26/12/1928, and to clarify further, i have been credited 3 years contributions by department of work and Pension. my request for proportionate rate of SRP was turned down by the Dept and the First Tier Tribunal, siting that i need a minimum of 25% or 10 years work contributions. My Question was if i have fulfilled the first requirement for an SRP and have more than one year credits, then should not the second condition be merely to indicate the rate or amount of pension i should get? Can the second contributing condition take over and nullify the first condition?

        • David Morris says

          Hello Gurmit, I believe the conditions are quite clear. You needed 11 years of NIC contributions to qualify for a minimum basic state pension.

          • Gurmit Singh Purewal says

            Dear David
            it is my understanding that the 10 year / 25% cap was brought about (in retrospect) via an ammendment in 2014. From 2010 just one qualifying year was enough for getting a proportionate state pension. I attained pensionable age in 1992-93, it appears that i deferred my pension for too long.

            According to which Act or Law, has my entitlement with 50 contributions pre 1975, been overruled now?

  93. O. C. Gordon says

    My father now deceased was a British citizen, he worked in the U. K. for over 35 years. However, I have never lived nor worked in the U. K. Am I entitled to benefit from his pension. if so, at what age. How and when can I apply for same.

  94. I am a female born 17-09-1953. Before I moved to Canada at age 21, I worked in the UK for about 3 years but I am not sure exactly (could possibly be less). If what I have read is right I may be able to qualify for a partial state pension. How would I determine if I contributed the required 3 years and if so can I now purchase the missing 7 years of contributions to qualify for a partial state pension?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Lesley, if you join us, we will send you an information package that answers your questions, including how to find out your current status, and how to make back payments. You should be able to catch up for the 7 missing years, but don’t delay

      • I just sent signed up on-line to join. I also checked on-line and my pension date was March 2018. As I have already reached my pension date can I still catch up for the missing years?

  95. Carl Burton says

    Hello, I am a UK citizen who was born in 1955 and worked in the UK from 1970 to 1975. Since then I have been working abroad. Will I be able to receive a pension? If not and I return to the UK how many years must I work there to recieve a pension? Thanks in advance

    • David Morris says

      Hello Carl, you will need 10 years to qualify for a minimum pension. The good news as that you can continue to make voluntary contributions from abroad. You don’t have to return to the UK to build pension entitlement.
      If you join us, we will send you a package of information on how to go about doing this. zit is definetley worth your while

  96. David
    Worked in south of Ireland for 1 year 79 to 80 and then 2 years in Northern Ireland 80 to 82. Moved to Canada in 82 and been there since. born 1955.
    Does it make sense to contribute 8 years to get to the 10 year level and how much has to be contributed in total.

    • David Morris says

      Hello James, the issue may be that you will not be entitled to make voluntary contributions. You need to have lived in the UK for 3 continuous years AND have made 3 years of NI contributions before you are allowed to make voluntary contributions.
      It may be worthwhile enquiring to see whether you are eligible.

  97. Dear David,

    I am British and US citizen. I worked in UK for some years and then worked in US for some years and then return to UK and currently working in UK as self employed and making my contributions.

    I have contribution for 22 years in UK and I have state pension in US as well. I will be 62 years old this year and can start claiming my US state pension. I will have to wait for 4 more years before I can claim the UK pension.

    I am currently residing in UK. My question is:

    1) Can I claim my US pension while residing in UK and continue to contribute towards my UK pension? If so, how will this affect my tax return? Will this be different if I was residing in US.

    2) When I am 66, can I claim both US and UK pension in saperately in both contries? If so, how will it affect my tax return?

    Many thanks for your help

    • David Morris says

      Hello Yusuf, I can’t help you regarding the rules for US pensions. I am not familiar enough with them. I do know that you can claim both, but I do not know the tax situation. Sorry

  98. Deborah May Coetzee says

    Hi David,
    My mom was born 15-1-1948. Her british passport is xxxxxxxxx. they left Lusaka on 3=1=1964 for Wimbourne in Dorset. Left therein November 1964. The lived in Guernsey, Channel Islands until october 1967. I would like to know if she qualifies for a british state pension.
    Regards
    Deborah May Coetzee

    • David Morris says

      Hello Deborah, I masked your mom’s passport number for security reasons. If she did not work in the UK for at least 1 year, then she would not be eligible for a pension

  99. Dieter Kupsch says

    Hallo,

    I worked in England, Scotland and Wales from 1989 to 1995. Do I qualify for a Pension? My wife also worked from 1990 until 1995. Does she qualify?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Dieter, if you are part of the Eu, then every year worked in any EU country qualifies towards a pension, so yes, your work time in the UK qualifies for a partial UK pension. I do not know what will happen after Brexit though

  100. Jonathan Fulljames says

    Hi David,

    I retired from the UK police service in 2010 with a 25-year pension, and brought it out to Canada under the QROPS scheme. It was invested in two QROPS approved investment schemes here. Since that date, the QROPS regulations have changed and QROPS schemes do not exist in Canada. I have not touched a penny since I brought the pension out to Canada, but in 2019 I will be 55 years of age and believe that I can start withdrawing from the pension investments. My questions are:

    1. As the pension was legitimately invested in QROPS approved schemes, and have continued to be administered under the rules of the QROPS scheme, am I entitled to take 25% of the funds as a ‘tax-free’ lump sum, free of both UK and Canadian tax?

    2. As I will not have been a UK tax payer since 2010, and have lived in Canada since that date, other than notifying HM Revenue and Customs, are there likely to be any implications in withdrawing from the QROPS pension?

    3. If the answer to Question 1 is “Yes, one can make a ‘tax-free’ withdrawal, where can I find written evidence of this to present to the Canadian financial institutions (they seem to have very little idea about this themselves).

    4. Is there a firm of tax specialists with experience of QROPS in Canada that you recommend?

    Thanks for your expertise!

    • David Morris says

      Hello Jonathan, sorry I can’t really help you. I am only vaguely familiar with QROPS. I can tell you that you are also eligible for a UK state pension as well as your police pension.

  101. Hello there,
    I am 44, originally Polish and I’ve been working as self-employed in the UK since 2009 paying NI contribution each year.
    Now I’m planning to move back to Poland, but I’d like to stay in UK pension system and keep paying NIC for several years more to get as high pension as possible in the future. How can I do that?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Matt, your pension eligibility comes under EU rules, and I am not an expert in those. I know the pensions are harmonised, meaning you get credit for every year worked in an EU country. I do not believe you can make UK contributions while living in another Eu country, but I am not certain.

  102. Frances Collier says

    I was born in Scotland in 1953 and left the UK at age 2 and have never returned. Would I be able to claim a UK pension?

  103. Alexandra says

    Hello David, I am 48 years , French and I have been living and working in the UK for the past 22 years. I am thinking to leave the UK for good in 2021. What will be my rights and duties when I leave, what I can do?
    Thanks

    • David Morris says

      Hello Alexandra, you are eligible for a UK pension based on those 22 years. If you live in another EU country, you will also be eligible for a pension from that country for any years worked there. Not sure what you mean by duties. If you leave the UK permanently, you no longer have any duties there

  104. Janette Sumner says

    Hi I was born in the IOM 1955..lived in England .till I was 28 ,(1984) then emigrated to Canada leaving my abusive husband ,never divorced and he died in 1999. I worked on and off part or full time between 1970 untill 1984.I had 2 children 1978 and 1983. Am I entitled to any pensions at all .. a widows or UK pension? I have a NI number .I am single .

    • David Morris says

      Hello Janette, you might be entitled to a partial UK pension. If you join us, we can give you information on what to do next, including finding out your pension eligibility.

  105. E. Roger says

    Dear David,
    I’m a British citizen, born in 1958 ,and lived in the UK until 1982 when I went to France for employment and where I have lived ever since except for a year back in England from 1988 to 1989. Although I never worked in england my National Insurance Record says that I have 3 years full contributions which were gained as credits for periods of unemployment during the time I lived in England. I have recently applied to pay voluntary Class 3 NI contributions but my claim has been rejected and I’ve been told I’m not eligible to pay these contributions. I was told that my case does not comply with the Regulation 147 of the Social Security Regulations 2001. ( I have not had any employment for several years but am not claiming any benefits for this).
    I do not understand why I’m not eligible seeing as I have 3 years full contributions. Please could you tell me if you think they have made an error and let me know if I am entitled to pay the class 3 contributions.
    Also, I would be very grateful if you could let me know where I can find a copy of this Regulation 147 or especially the eligibility criteria for Class 3 contributions for those living in an EU country.
    with many thanks,
    E. Roger

    • David Morris says

      Hello E Roger, the rules for pensions in the EU are very different, and I am not familiar with them. I know they are harmonised, so it may be that you can’t make contributions because you were obtaining pension credits in France.
      Unfortunately, I can’t help you any further than that. This website is really for expats to non EU countries, because the rules are so different for the EU

  106. Thomas Gerald Thompson says

    David, I was born in 1953, I worked fm 1968-1975, left for overseas, returned to the UK and worked fm 1977 thru 2000, I have been living overseas since. I am currently living in Malaysia how do I stand with regards to my pension.

    Rgds

    Gerry Thompson

    • David Morris says

      Hello Gerry, looks like you have at least 30 years of pension credits – maybe more. You only need 35 to get a full pension, so yes you are entitled to a UK state pension. If you join us, we can send you a complete package on what to do next.

  107. Claudia Lake says

    Hi, I am a Canadian citizen, lived and worked in the UK from 1987 to 1988, then again from 1989 to 1992; I wonder if I might be eligible for any form of UK pension? I was born in Canada in 1958, female. Many thanks, Claudia. Also, on behalf of my elderly mother, a child refugee from Poland, who was granted asylum in Great Britain in 1946, became a British citizen, attended school and began a working life there prior to emigrating to Canada in May of 1957; we wonder if my mother is also eligible for a British pension of some sort. Thank you for any information you can provide. Look forward to your reply.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Claudia, you will need 10 years of employment credits to qualify, but you should be able to make some voluntary contributions which should get you at least the minimum pension. Your mother may also be entitled to a partial pension, if she had 10 years of work credits

  108. Dayle W says

    Dear David
    I was born in 1958 in the midlands and worked for govt from 1975 to 2002. When will I be able to retire and do I qualify for full state pension ? I currently live in Thailand

    • David Morris says

      Hello Dayle, you will reach pension age in 2024.You will need 35 years for a full pension. It looks like yo have around 28 years of work credits, so you are not quite eligible for a full pension. The good news is that you can continue to make voluntary contributions from abroad, which will get you to 35. If you join us, we will send you a complete information package on what to do next

  109. Stephen King says

    I was born in the UK in 1953 and worked there from 1975 to 1993, at which point I emigrated to Canada where I have been ever since. How much UK Govt pension can I expect to receive as of October 2018 which is my official pension age?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Stephen, you would get 1/35th of the full pension for every year you made National insurance contributions. Looks like you have at least 18 years, possibly more, so that would be 18/35ths of the full pension. The good news is that you can still make some voluntary contributions, which would increase your pension.
      At the moment the full pension is £6549 annually

      • June Elizabeth Ann McShane (née Turner) says

        I was born in Northern Ireland 1951 and in 1960 my parents immigrated to Australia
        I worked there but now retired and get Australia pension. I have moved back to
        Northern Ireland to live , but I don’t have a national Insurance number what can I do to get
        One please. As Australia pension goes up and down it hard to live on .Is there any assistance
        That we can get .. My parents had a national Insurance numbers so would I have been on it

        • David Morris says

          Hello June, the only way to get a national insurance number is by employment. Without an employment record, you would not be eligible for a state pension.
          I can’t help you in terms of what other benefits you might be eligible for. I have been away from the UK for many years and am not familiar with what is available

  110. KATHLEEN KELLY_MEEHAN says

    dont publish where do i apply 4 uk disabiliyk state pension 2 top up up/
    lived in uk 86 91 paid nins 93 94 uk disability

    • David Morris says

      Hello Kathleen, I can not help you with a disability pension. I don’t know anything about that

  111. Hi,
    My dad lived and worked in the UK for the NHS for +-3 years from 1977-1981. DOB 12th Oct 1945. Is he entitled to a UK Pension? If yes, will he get back payment? what needs to be done? He is currently in his home country. Thank you.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Jane, yes he should be entitled to a partial UK pension, which would be backdated to his retirement date. If you join us, we will send you a complete information package on what to do next

  112. Patricia says

    Hi I was born in 1980 and have worked in the uk for 8 consecutive years, and have always paid national insurance, I am due to return to Spain where I am originally from, will I be entitled to a uk pension? Does it make any difference having British citizenship? Thanks

    • David Morris says

      Hello Patricia, you do not need UK citizenship. Under current EU rules you would be entitled to a UK pension for every year that you worked there. This would be added to any Spanish pension you would be entitled to

  113. Hi there, my father is a British citizen but has been living in South Africa for many years but due to financial issues in South Africa, we are trying to understand what UK state help can be provided if we get him to the UK as we cannot provide support and living arrangements for him in South Africa. How do we go about finding more information?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Nicola, I can’t really help you with this. You need to contact the various agencies in the UK about what help is available in the UK

  114. Bill White says

    Hi, my name is Bill White, I moved to Canada when I was 20, I worked in the UK for 4 years, i was born in 1949, would I be eligible to collect a uk pension.

    thanks Bill

    • David Morris says

      Hello Bill, yes, you are eligible for a partial UK pension, and can even make some back contributions to increase it. You should pursue this as soon as possible, as your ability to make voluntary contributions diminishes over time. If you join us, we will send you an information package on how to proceed

  115. Kobina Beecham says

    Hello David,

    I worked in the UK on and off between 1988 to 1991.
    I then worked continuously from 1991 to 1996 at the now defunct Unigate.
    I then worked for a Software company in Berkshire from 1995 to 1997
    Throughout my employment in all places, my national insurance contributions were deducted appropriately

    I then left the UK for my home country Ghana and haven’t been back since.

    Question 1:- Is it possible to find out how much in National Insurance Contributions I paid in total
    Question 2:- Can I voluntarily top up my pension from Ghana every year until I am 65 to qualify for a UK pension?
    How much would I have to top up every year?
    Question 3:- How and to who do I have to pay my voluntary contributions to? Is there a website or email address that can give me step by step directions?

    Thanks

    • David Morris says

      Hello Kobina, yes, you are eligible for a UK pension, and you can top up every year until pension age. Your best bet is to join us. We will send you by email a complete information package on what to do next – including how to find out your current level of contributions and how to make top up payments. You can join us right on this site.

  116. Jenny Lancaster says

    Hi, I was born in the UK and studied and worked there from 1964 to 1968, then Canada for 2 years, then UK from 1970 to 1976, date of birth April 1949, Do I qualify for a British pension?

    • David Morris says

      Hi Jenny, yes, it looks like you are eligible for a partial UK pension. If you join us, we will email you a complete information package on what to do next, including getting a pension statement. The good news is that your pension will be backdated to your pension date, which is April 2009

  117. fazal rahman says

    i am 70 years and getting state pension 0f 53.15 per week from august 13 if i move back to uk how much pension will i get. i am living in pakistan.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Fazal, it is difficult to advise you exactly how much you would get if you returned. It depends on whether yiou are getting a full or partial pension now.I would estimate roughly £62 a week

  118. Dear David,
    I left the UK in 2000 got married and live in USA. I will be getting my UK pension in 2022. Some people I have spoken to said I could be eligible to pay Class 2. I was self employed in UK 1991-2000 and wondered if they will let me pay for those years that I did not pay enough NI Class 2. Do you think they will let me do that? Or will I have to pay Class 3 from 2006 onwards. I have not been employment in USA. I am waiting to hear from UK about it and not heard anything yet.

    Thank you for your thoughts.

    • David Morris says

      Hi Jayne, I honestly can’t say. The rules on Class 2 eligibility are not clear. if you have requested this from the UK, all you can do is wait and see what they say

  119. Elizabeth Milton says

    My brother-in-law born 19 May 1942 emigrated to South Africa in 1965. He worked in the UK for 8 years but understand that you need 11 years NI contributions to be eligible for a UK pension. However, he did undertake an apprenticeship from 16 June 1958 – 18 May 1963. Could he pay the three missing years of NI contributions to qualify for a UK pension? If so, how does he go about this?
    Kind regards

    • David Morris says

      Hello Elizabeth, he will not be able to make up any missing years, as it is too late for that. However, he may have more years than 8. His apprenticeship should count. The best thing to do is for him to contact the Dept of Works and Pensions to find out how many years credit he has

  120. Steve Denney says

    Hello David,

    I’m British, born in Leicester.
    I’m married to a Japanese national and we have a British/Japanese son. We currently live in Japan.
    We are considering returning to the UK to live meaning my wife will need a non-EU spouse visa.

    Can she pay into the UK state pension scheme on a Spouse visa if she is working full time in the UK during the spouse visa period?
    (i.e. Can she use the 5 years of the spouse visa period to add to her qualifying years for the state pension?)

    We are already in our 40s.

    Thank you for any advice you can give.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Steve, if your spouse works in the UK, she will be required to pay National Insurance contributions, which will count towards a UK pension. Citizenship is irrelevent. Providing she is working, she will be contributing to the pension scheme.Once she receives a National Insurance number, she will be able to continue to make contributions even if she is no longer residing in the UK.

  121. Hello David, a few questions for you:

    * I worked in the UK from 1980 until 2003 and then moved to Brasil. I am British and was born in England. Under current rules what Category A pension would i receive from an amount viewpoint once I reach retirement age?
    * Seeing as I will be entitled to a Cat.A pension would my Brazilian partner be entitled to a Cat B penson even though she has not lived or worked in the UK?
    * How can I make AVC’s to top up my UK pension?

    Regards, Stephen

    • David Morris says

      Hello Stephen, its difficult to give you the exact amount, as it will depend on the pension amount being paid when you reach pension age. Assumin you have 23 years of contributions, you will get 23/35ths of whatever the full pension is at the time. If you make AVC’s, then the amount you will receive is simply prorated. You get 1/35th of a full pension for every year you contributed.
      If your partner has not yet reached pension age, then they will not be entitled to any CATB pension. The rules changed in 2016. They will only be entitled to a pension in their own right, based on working in the Uk.
      If you join us, we will send you a complete package of information on how to make AVC’s, apply for a forecast and other useful information

  122. Raymond Phillips says

    Hi David I was born in England 1953 but moved to CANADA in 1980 I worked about 7 to 8 years before leaving am i entitled to a pension also was in the Army if so how do I go about getting it as I am almost 65.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Raymond, you will need 10 years to qualify for a minimum pension. Any time spent in the army will count towards that 10 years. The good news is that you can still make catch up contributions from Canada which will add to your pension amount, and ensure that you meet the minimum 10 years (if you haven’t already). I suggest you join us, and we will send you an information packege on how to get started,including how to apply, and how to make voluntary contributions

  123. Paul Henry says

    please be so kind as to send a package with retirement information, i worked in the UK from 1980-1984 and emigrated to the USA a year later. I paid NI payments. I was born in 1964 and would like information.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Paul, If you join us, we will send you a complete package of information. We are a not for profit group supporting expat British pensioners, and campaigning the UK Government to provide annual indexing. You can join right on this site, and we will send you an email package within a few days of your joining

  124. helen Addison says

    Hello I was born in August 1952 but have only 20 qualifying years of contributions. I have delayed taking my pension because I was informed that I would get more the longer I waited ,is this true /?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Helen, yes, your monthly pension amount will be bigger if you delay starting your pension.It increases by approx 5.8% every year for each year you defer it

  125. Dear David,

    My mother in law was legally married to a British National, and her husband is now a pensioner of UK. They are now residing here in the Philippine. They live together for more than 20 years, however, my mother in law did not acquire British Citizenship, she neither lives in England for so long, she just visited there once and never go there again. Sir, my question is if her husband died, may the pension of her husband who is currently receiving pension be transferred to her? Considering that by law my mother in law is one of her surviving and legitimate heirs.

    Hoping to hear from you soon and thank you very much for your time.

    Sincerely,

    Lyka

    • David Morris says

      Hello Lyka, it depends on your mother in laws age. if she reached pension age prior to April 2016, then yes, she would be entitled to some or all of her husbands pension. If she reached pension age after thant, then she would not be entitled to anything

      • Dear David,

        Hello again! Just a follow up question, what if my mother in law acquires British citizenship, will she be entitled for the pension?

        Thank you very much, this site is very useful for every one, especially for us who have no knowledge of British laws and policies.

        Sincerely,

        Lyka

        • Dear David,

          Hello again! Just a follow up question because my mother in law is just 59 years old this year and I believe she will not be entitled to the transfer of pension, what if my mother in law acquires British citizenship, will she be entitled for the pension?

          Thank you very much, this site is very useful for every one, especially for us who have no knowledge of British laws and policies.

          Sincerely,

          Lyka

          • David Morris says

            Hello Lyka, unfortunately no. Citizenship is not relevent. She has to have worked in the Uk to qualify

  126. Norman Strongbow says

    How do you enter banking details on UK state pension application?
    Is the pension wire transferred or electronically deposited.
    Wire transfer incurs a cost with Canadian bank of around $14 to $17.
    Here is how my friend filled out Part 9 of State Pension Application –
    (He has received his pension for the last 3 years with no bank charges in Canada)

    Account Number:
    7 digit number

    Account Type:
    1 digit number (0 for chequing; 1 for savings)

    Branch/Bank Code:
    5 digit number (Bank Transit Code)

    International Bank Account Number:
    left blank

    Bank Code:
    3 digit number (identifies the actual bank)

    • David Morris says

      hello Norman, the normal process for pension payments in Canada is via electronic direct deposit. You do not require wire transfers.All you need to do is complete the banking information in the application form

  127. Ned Flanders says

    I am a male receiving a state pension as a British Citizen born in England in 1951. My sons want to get Irish Citizenship because of Brexit and as my mother was Irish I have been thinking of becoming a dual national or Irish Citizen myself.

    Will this affect my pension or other benefits that I currently get?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Ned, citizenship does not affect your pension eligibility. I can not speak to any other benefits, but certainly state pension is not affected

  128. Rebecca Ellen Baden Powell says

    Dear David,
    I was born in 1962 in the UK. I had two children there. I worked with p.a.y.e. for a short time with several jobs and left in 1991 to Ireland. I was a Royal Naval wife for around 8 years. Am I entitled to anything?
    thank you.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Rebecca, as you live in Ireland, you come under EU rules for pension eligibility. I am not familiar with EU rules. You would need to check with the pension dept in ireland. I also can’t comment on your eligibility for a Naval pension. You would need to contact the Royal navy pension administration for that

  129. MandyTredoux says

    Hi, I was born in the UK in 1964 and immigrated to SA with my parents who have now returned to the UK. I have never worked in the UK and would like to know if it is possible to pay a lump sum voluntary contribution for the minimum 10 year contribution (or more) and continue paying contributions in order to qualify for state pension ? I am considering moving back to the UK in the future, if I do would that make any difference to whether I would qualify or not and if I decided to remain in SA would I still qualify if I made voluntary contributions ?
    Thank you
    Mandy

    • David Morris says

      Hello Mandy, you cannot make contributions unless you have a National Insurance number, and you cannot get an NI number unless you worked in the UK. If you go back to the UK and work, you would get an NI number and would make contributions going forward, bu would not be able to catch up prior to that

  130. Susan Rutherford says

    Dear David,

    I was born in England Dec 24th 1950 and worked from June 1966 to Aug 1972 at which time I emigrated to Canada.
    I’m wondering if I’m entitled to any pension from England and if so how to go about applying for it.

    Thank you
    Susan Rutherford

    • David Morris says

      Hi Susan, yes, you are entitled to a partial UK pension, which would be backdated to 2011. Your best bet is to join us. We will send you a complete information package on how to claim your pension

    • i was born in u.k. in 1940……then worked for 4 years later in life before going to canada…..also was resident in u.k. for about 3 years at one point later in life.

      would i get a u.k. pension if i applied, and woul i be able to contribute to make up the lost time.

      thank you

      • David Morris says

        Hello Rebecca, you needed 10 years of NI contributions to qualify. It does not sound like you have that, and you are too late to make up any contributions. Sorry

  131. Hello David

    My mother in law has got 26 qualifying years and will turn 70 this year. She has not yet started drawing the state pension and is still working. She would like to retire this year. She may be able to claim additional years she missed looking after her children, however, she did not draw child benefit at the time. What proof would be required to make these claims as they are not currently showing on her record?

    Also given that the pension has been deferred and will have increased, how is it calculated. ie is it 10.4% x 10 years or 1.104^10 compounded.

    Many thanks for you help

    Will

    • David Morris says

      Hi Will, sorry for the delay. I missed this one. In terms of child rearing credits proof, I can’t honestly say. You would have to contact the DWP for this.
      You raise an interesting question about the deferment calculation. It isn’t clear from the DWP website. I suspect it is 10.4% for each year deferred, so the calculation is more likely to be 10.4% x 10, rather than compounding

  132. Velika Koleva says

    Hello.I am from Bulgaria and get pension from there at the moment after 35 years work there. Now I live in England permanent from 1 year to my dauther. I would you ask do I can to start to get any supplement to my pension from England?And how to apply for it?Thank you.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Velika, I am not familiar with the rules that apply to people living in the UK. I can only provide information on the state pension to people living outside of the UK

  133. Hi, I acquired British nationality automatically at birth due to my Father who was born and raised in the UK. I reside in SA. Do I qualify for a British Pension?

  134. Hi
    I am 65 next December.
    I worked in UK between 1974 and 1980 and then moved to Ireland and worked there from 1980 to 1995.
    I moved back to UK in 2000 and have lived here since , however have not been in employment.

    Can I receive a UK Pension ??

    • David Morris says

      Hello Peter, you come under EU rules for pensions, and I am not familiar with all the details, but essentially yes, you are entitled to a pension for every year you worked in any country in the EU, including the UK

  135. Mark Richardson says

    Thanks for an interesting site. I am a UK citizen born in 1963. I worked in the UK from 1986 after leaving university util 1995 when I left for the US where I have been ever since. I am now married to a US citizen, with children here, but am still a citizen of the UK, not the US.

    If I understand what I have read, I need to make 1-2 years of contributions in order to pass the 10-year threshold, and at that point I’ll qualify for a minimum UK pension. I do have a couple of questions:

    – Do I need to return to the UK to live at all to be able to claim this pension?
    – If I make voluntary contributions each year from now for the next 10-12 years while I am working, does that increase the annual amount I could receive upon reaching the retirement age (which I believe will be 67)?

    • David Morris says

      hello Mark
      1. You do not need to return to the UK. Your pension can be claimed and paid anywhere in the world.You can also make voluntary contributions from anywhere in the world
      2. Yes, every year you make a voluntary contribution adds to your pension. It is a simple prorating. You need 35 years for the maximum pension, so every voluntary contribution gives you 1/35 of the full pension amount

      • Mark Richardson says

        Thank you for this information David. I do have a supplementary question.

        While it seems strange to me, I have read somewhere that my wife – a US citizen who has spent time but never worked in the UK – is entitled, as my spouse to some form of UK pension as well. This doesn’t really seem right to be honest but do you know if there is any substance to this?

        Thanks again,
        Mark

        • David Morris says

          Hello Mark, it depends on your spouses age. Ih she reaches pension age after April 2016, then she would have to earn a pension in her own right. If she reached pension age prior to that, it is possible that she may qualify for a percentage of your pension

  136. Brigitte Lawrie says

    Hi. My husband was born in Glasgow, Scotland in 1959, and his family came to South Africa to work when he was about 4 years old. When he was 21 he returned to the UK and worked for +- 4 years and then returned to SA. He does not have SA citizenship and is classed as a permanent resident. He is not eligible for a SA old age pension as a non citizen. Is he eligible for a UK old age pension when he reaches 65? If not would his only option at the age of 65, be to return to the UK to remain for the rest of his life and then apply for benefits? I know his Mom who is also still living in SA receives a UK old age pension. Any advice you can offer would be appreciated.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Brigitte, your husband will need 10 years of contributions to the pension scheme to be eligible. The good news is that he can make pension contributions from abroad which will get him at least to the 10 he needs. This is a good deal, so he should pursue it. If you join us, we will send you an information package on how to get a pension statement, and how to make contributions from abroad

      • Brigitte Lawrie says

        Thanks David how do we join? Also how do we find out exactly how many contributions he has made to date?

  137. Doug Craig says

    Hello David,

    I am resident in the USA, and have been for 30+ years. I served on the Royal Navy from 1965 to 1975. Former naval colleagues think I should be able to get a state pension (didn’t serve long enough for RNP). I paid NI during my service term, and also for a couple of years before going overseas. I was born in March 1948, and have therefore just turned 70.

    Any ideas as to what I should be claiming, if anything? Also, are pension payments back paid to age 65? (Worth asking)

    Thanks

    Doug

  138. Hello, my father in law is Polish and worked in the UK for 9 years (he’s got 9 full qualifying years of NI contributions). Born on 4/04/1952 and reached pension age on 4/4/2017. Unfortunately he moved back to Poland a year earlier, so his last qualifying year was 2015/16. We asked HMRC if he cHello, my father in law is Polish and worked in the UK for 9 years (he’s got 9 full qualifying years of NI contributions). Born on 4/04/1952 and reached pension age on 4/4/2017. Unfortunately he left back to Poland year earlier, so his last qualifying year was 2015/16. We asked HMRC if he could pay voluntary contributions for 2016/17 so he could have 10 years and some partial State Pension, but we were told that the last year ould pay voluntary contributions for 2016/17 so he could have 10 years and partial State Pension, but we were told that the last year one can pay voluntary NI contributions for is the YEAR BEFORE the year they reach state pension age. In this case – he can’t as he was born on 4th April 2017. If he was born 2 DAYS AFTER that date, it would be possible.
    Is there anything we could do to pay for that one year so he would qualify for state pension?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Gosia, if your father in law moved back to Poland, then he will be entitled to a pension based on every year he worked in the UK. The 10 year minimum rule does not apply if you are a citizen of the EU

  139. Hi

    I have only lived in the Uk for the last three years and have been contributing to National Insurance. How many years do I need to contribute to claim a state pension and can I add to the fund if need be?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Gail, you will need 10 years, and yes, you can continue to make voluntary contributions from abroad. I do not know the rules about contributing if you are still in the UK, but not working

  140. Carlos Mauricio Matos Morgado says

    Hello!
    My father is portuguese, and worked and lived in UK (Scotland) from 2003 to 2011. He was born in 1952. Is he entitle to receive a state pension from UK? Even if he was not completed 10 years of contributions.
    Thanks for your time.

    • David Morris says

      hello Carlos. You don’t say where your father lives. If he lives in the Eu then he is entitled to a UK pension based on the years he worked there. Otherwise he will need 10 years of contributions. The good news is that he can make back contributions for missing years, which will get him to the minimum he needs

  141. Julian Jordan says

    Dear David
    My father-in-law (DOB 1/10/37) has retired to his native country of Trinidad and has been receiving a UK state pension since he reached retirement age. As I understand it, he spent around 15 years of his working life working in the UK (through the late 1960s/70s/ early 80s) and paying NI. He has recently been on the phone telling us he’s received a letter telling him that all his pension payments are going to cease. This is obviously of great concern; we’ve asked him to mail us a copy of the letter but this will take some time to cross the world. He’s not in great health, and having him read the letter to us over the telephone proved impossible; it took many minutes just to communicate our postal address… While we wait to read the letter for ourselves, I found your website and wondered if you were aware of any scenario in which a UK state pension would be happily paying out and then suddenly stop? This seems to defeat the whole concept of a pension? We’re hoping that my father-in-law has somehow got the wrong interpretation of the situation.
    Thanks for your help, Julian

    • David Morris says

      Hello Julian, almost certainly what has happened is that he would have received something called a Life Certificate. This is sent out by the pensions dept to overseas pensioners on a random basis. The pensioner has to get someone to sign it and return it to the DWP to confirm he is still alive. If the DWP do not receive it in time, they stop the pension payment with no further notice. The good news is that they will restart it, and make up the payments missed, once he submits the signed life certificate

  142. Graham Maggs says

    I was born in the UK in 1957 and worked full time in the UK from 30/6/1975 until 4/6/2005. I have been working and living in the USA since 2005. When I reach 65 can I claim a UK pension and have it paid into my US Bank account. Can I continue working full time in the USA while getting a UK pension?

  143. Hi David,

    Thank you for the article.

    I paid 30 years qualifying NIC contributions up until 2010/11. I was then told that I had qualified for a full UK State Pension.
    I now gather I must pay another 5 years worth. I am 53, live in South Africa where I have been resident since 1997. I worked in the UK until May 1995. I was then employed from May 1995 until 2002 and started my own company where I am an employee. Question: Can I pay Class 2 NICS which are cheaper or must I pay Class 3 NICS?
    There is quite a difference!
    I look forward to hearing from you.

    Kind regards,

    Piers

    • David Morris says

      Hello Piers, the rules are not well defined. You basically have to apply for it. Generally, you can pay Class 2 if you worked in the UK right up to the time that you left, and then started work in SA as soon as you arrived. To be honest, they don’t make it easy to apply for Class 2, but you might as well give it a shot.
      If you had been paying Class 3 from abroad up until now, you likely will have to continue

  144. Sam Jones says

    Hi There,

    I worked from 1982 to 1990 in the UK and then moved to Canada. I was employed full time during this time, will I be eligible to claim for a pension. Thanks!

    • David Morris says

      Hello Sam, are you talking about a Canadian pension or a UK pension ? Also, I need to know your date of birth

      • I worked full time in England fOr 7 years then emigrated to Canada in 1991. Which form do I have to fill in to find out how much it will cost me to buy back time and hopefully get a minimum pension? I am 63 yrs old .

        • David Morris says

          Hi Janet, we can help with this. If you join us, we will send you a complete information package on how to make contributions from abroad, how much it will cost, and how to apply. Plus lots of other useful information

  145. MR SK OMOLE says

    Hi, my name is Sylvester I am 57yrs old I am a naturalised british . I have worked for 12yrs paying NI,and I think I will be able to get the state pension when I am 65yrs old, I still have 8yrs more to get to 65yrs as at today, but I want to go away from uk for good.Pls tell me the amount to add to my already paid NI, for the next 8 yrs when I will be 65yrs so that I an pay it in ahead in lump sum so that I will be able to get the state pension as from year 2028. I was born in 1961.Thanks

    • David Morris says

      Hello Sylvester, you can not make advance lump payments for future NI payments. What you can do is make payments from abroad each year

  146. Hi there,

    I worked in London for several years (I’m Australian) before returning back to live in Australia. Am I eligible or qualified for pension? Or is it a minimum 10 years of work?

    Thanks

    • David Morris says

      Hello Eliza, it really depends on your age as to whether you need 10 years or 1 year.. Be aware that if you do need 10 years, you can continue to make National Insurance contributions from abroad, until you reach pension age. That will get you at least the minimum pension

  147. Hello David,
    My parents came to UK on a working visa in 2004. My dad year of birth is 1951

    My dad has worked in the UK from March 2004 to March 2007 on a work permit. He then worked in Dublin from March 2007 to December 2007 or January 2008
    He then got a work permit for New Zealand whereby he worked there from 2008 to 2010

    My questions
    1. Dublin then was still part of EU, right ?
    2. Does that mean he can combine his UK & Dublin contribution period?
    3. I read on the GOV.UK website that The UK has social security agreements with New Zealand &
    If you live in one of the following countries and receive a UK State Pension, you will usually get an increase in your pension every year:
    •Barbados
    •Bermuda
    •Bosnia-Herzegovina
    •Jersey
    •Guernsey
    •the Isle of Man
    •Israel
    •Jamaica
    •Kosovo
    •Macedonia
    •Mauritius
    •Montenegro
    •the Philippines
    •Serbia
    •Turkey
    •USA

    4. My parents do not hold a British Passport nor Permanent resident, will they still qualify for the state pension?
    5. My mother has worked from October 2004 to October 2007, I understand its less than 10 years contribution & she is born in 1962. Is there a way to combine my mum’s dad’ contribution together so they can benefit a joint pension? A per law , husband & wife are one, right?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Dee, lots of questions.
      1. You cannot combine contributions between spouses, although your mother still has the opportunity to make further contributions to get to the 10 years.
      2. Pension eligibility has nothing to do with citizenship, only contributions to the pension scheme matter
      3. You father can combine EU and UK periods for eligibility towards an EU pension
      4. If you live in New Zealand, you do not get an increase in the state pension

  148. Hi David,

    I was borne on the 19th May 1951,

    Will I be illegible for the UK State pension on the old or new rules.

    Old up to April 2016 new rules past April 2016

  149. I was born in the UK and started working full time in August 1977. I left the UK permanently migrating to Australia in October 1988 and have lived and worked in Australia permanently since then.
    Accordingly I was working in the UK between August 1977 and October 1988. Though i spent one of those years travelling in Australia from November 1983 til November 1984 (so was outside of the UK) and one year studying full time in the UK between September 1987 and October 1988. Might I be eligible to a UK state pension based on this?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Mark, you need 10 years of NI Payments to qualify, so you are likely very close, or have already qualified. You do get credit for certain periods of education. If you have not already qualified, you can certainly buy back any years you need. If you join us, we will send you a complete information package on how to find out your eligibility, and how to make any back payments.

  150. linda greenberg says

    Dear David,
    I was born in the UK on August 31, 1947 and lived with my parents there until we all moved to Kenya in about 1956 and subsequently to South Africa in 1960, where I have lived ever since. I now have two adult sons who live and work in the UK and would like to move back there to live with them. Do I qualify for a pension?
    Many thanks, Linda

    • David Morris says

      Hello Linda, you would not qualify for a state pension, as it is based on years worked. You may qualify for other Government benefits, but to be honest, I don’t know what the rules are for all other benefits

  151. John Garside says

    I am 93 years old, was born in Greetland, Yorkshire on January 16, 1925. Before I joined the Royal Navy in 1943, I worked in a men’s store for about a year. In any case, I served as a Royal Naval Gunner on a series of Merchant Marine Ships during WWII and was discharged in 1946 having spend a while getting back to England, from Australia, after cessation of hostilities. I have inquired before about a pension and had no luck but saw your notice and thought I’d give it another try. I also worked for a year or two after returning to the U.K, before I emigrated to Canada in the summer of 1948 and where I lived until 1966 when we left for the USA. We returned to Canada in 1990 where we have lived since.

    • David Morris says

      Hello John, based on your age, you needed 11 years of NI contributions. It does not look like you have that. Sorry

  152. we came to Canada in 1979 aged 23 and 25, from UK, and been here since. we worked and were students for 3 years too. is it worth both of us applying and buying back the time? would we really still get something? Born 55 and 53.
    I have my NI # but I am pretty sure my husband wont!

    • David Morris says

      Hello Moira, yes, I believe buying back, and continuing to make contributions is a great financial deal. You will need 10 years of contributions to qualify for a minimum pension, so you may not have many years to go for that. From a pure financial perspective. it is definitely a good investment.

  153. Hello
    My mother was born in 1935 in Ireland and is regarded as a British subject under the British nationality act. She worked in London for three years between 1953 and 1956. Is she entitled to any form of pension for this? She is not entitled to an Irish pension as she never worked in Ireland.
    Many thanks.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Clare., your mother would need 10 years of NI contributions to qualify. Unfortunately, she does not qualify. It has nothing to do with citizenship, only years of contributions to the system

  154. A K Bandyopadhyay says

    I lived continuously in UK from May 1974 to Jan 1978 and Worked at one Univ (under then SRC) from Feb 1977 to Jan 1978 and made NI contribution for 12 months. Now, I am 67 years (& 8 months) old leaving in India. Am I eligible for Pension from UK?
    What about my USS Contribution? Pl also give me a e-mail ID so that I could send the documents. Thanks & regards
    Prof (Dr) Asis K, Bandyopadhyayay

    • David Morris says

      Hello A.K, if you were born after April 1 2010, then you only needed 1 year of work contributions to qualify for a minimum pension. If you join us, we will send you an information package on how to apply. You will also be able to make some back payments to buy additional years of pension eligibility

  155. I was born in London and was 1 year old when my family moved to Canada in 1965. I returned to England when I was 13 in 1977 and worked there until December 2002. I have 21 or 22 years employment history in the UK.

    What sort of pension would I be entitled to? I am thinking of moving back to the UK and I will most probably have a further ten year added to the 21 before I retire. I have a 15 years built up in Canada so I am not sure what would be best, stay in Canada to get the 20 years or move back and add to the UK fund?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Kevin, you can actually get both. You can continue to make contributions to the UK system while still living in Canada and building up eligibility for a Canadian pension. If you join us we will send you an information package on how to make additional contributions

    • ACD Haseldine says

      I am aow in 66 yo British Citizen but am living in SA and have never worked in the UK. I would like to retire in the UK but would I be able to be eligible to a Pension and how much. My Farther worked for the Grenider Guards and my Uncle was a Major with he British Guards.
      You reply will be greatly appreciated.

      • David Morris says

        Hi Tony, to qualify for the UK state pension, you have to have worked in the UK. It is not based on citizenship

  156. Hello, I am a member and have gotten my record from the UK. I have 19 years of NIC’s before leaving the UK for Canada in 1997. My record states that I can make voluntary contributions back to 2006, but they are all Class 3. I was working directly before coming to Canada and started working a few weeks after I arrived. My question is should I ask if some of those payments should be Class 2, or is it not likely that I am eligible for the lower rate?

    • David Morris says

      Hi Debbie, thanks for your support. You can certainly apply for Class 2 treatment. the rules aren’t well defined, but generally if you were working in the UK up until the time you left, and started working in Canada on arrival, you would qualify for Class 2. The problem is they don’t specify the exact details, nor do they make it easy to apply. You have to write a letter to them requesting Class 2 eligibility, stating that you worked in the UK up to the point of departure and that you started work in Canada within a very short period on arrival.

  157. Brian Osler says

    I was born in England in June of 1951, worked on and off from the age of 16 until 27. I was then offered a job in the USA, which I took and have been living here ever since. My question is: would I be entitled to any English pension?
    If so, how do I go about claiming it? I have been trying to find this out for months with no success.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Brian, yes, you are entitled to a partial UK pension.
      If you join us, we will send you a complete package of information on how to apply. You are also still eligible to make some back payments which will increase that pension. We tell you how to do that too. You can join securely right on this site by clicking the link below and following the instructions

      https://www.britishpensions.com/joinrenew/

    • Kee Lang Teo-Macdonald says

      Hi, I worked in the UK for 8 yrs, and have since found out that I am eligible to make voluntary contributions (born in 1954) for the 2 years shortfall. I’m in the process of filling out the “Application to pay NI contribution abroad”, and I’m wondering if you can advise me, as to the most convenient/economical way to make payment in Sterling? Unfortunately, my bank does not provide Direct Debit internationally, nor do they issue Money Order as they move into the electronic age. Thank you.

      • David Morris says

        Hello Kee Lang, this is something you have to take up with your bank. Most people use an International Money order. If your Bank does not provide that, then you need to ask them how to pay something in Sterling

  158. Good morning
    I am a British citizen but have never worked in the UK. My parents moved to South Africa where I grew up and worked. I now live in Malta. I am on the reciprocal health agreement here but because I do not have a British pension I am unable to get an S1 form and therefore although a I get full medical treatment paid for by the British government this does not include medication.
    If I lived in Britain I would get the medication free (I am 74 years old). Can I make a contribution for a minimum pension although I do not have an NI number?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Peter, no – without an NI number you cannot make any pension contributions. You also cannot get an NI number at this point

  159. Geraldine Toner says

    HI,

    I was born in N. Ireland in 1963 and worked for 5 years from 17 years old to 22 years old. I moved to live in Canada and in 2007 went back to N. Ireland and lived for a further 3.5 years, 3 of those I worked and paid my contributions before returning back to Canada. Do I qualify for a partial UK pension?

    Thanks
    Ger

    • David Morris says

      Hello Geraldine, you will need 10 years of pension contributions and are likely already eligible, or very close. You can make additional contributions from Canada which will get you to 10, or more.
      If you join us, we will send you a complete information package on how to get started, determine your current eligibility, and make additional contributions

  160. Cristina Domingos says

    I have worked in the UK since February 2013. I am a 27 years old Portuguese national and intend to move back to Portugal around 2021 where I will work then possibly until retirement age. Will I be able to get any partial state pension for the years I have lived and worked in the UK? I realise it will be less than 10 years and don’t want to loose the right to a state pension from UK. Would it be worth staying in the UK until I work for 10 years or will it count the years I worked before and after living in the UK for those 10 years? I would have worked about 8 years. Can I pay for the last 2 to have the right to the partial state pension from UK or how would it work best? Thank you very much.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Cristina, under current EU rules you do not need the 10 years to qualify. Every year is counted. What happens after Brexit I have no idea.

  161. Gillian Reischl says

    Hi – I was born in October 1957 and emigrated to Australia in 1976. I only worked for 2 years after I left school, can I pay 8 years to get upto 10years to be able to receive a pension once I turn 65?
    Thank you for your time

    • David Morris says

      Hello Gillian, absolutely you can make additional contributions. If you join us, we will send you a complete package on how to do that

  162. Hi there 🙂 I need a help about state pension ,

    The situation is, my dad was worked 8 years in UK and then he came back to Turkey so he is 65 years old now and he has a chance get a pension because of his age in UK if my dad will be pay 3 years missing to complete 11 years. Anyway my main question is, if my dad will get a pension from UK per month, he will have a any chance to being UK citizenship.Thanks a lot for now. Im so appreciate if you can help about.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Emre, I am afraid I can not help with your question about citizenship. I do not know what the rules are. I do know that pension eligibility has nothing to do with citizenship.

  163. Dear David
    I was born in UK & worked for 8 years before emigrating to Australia. I was originally told I would be eligible for a small UK pension from March 2018. I understand I now need 10 years before I can claim a pension. Is it too late to catch up on the lost 2 years before March 6th.
    Thanks Hazel

  164. Karen Murray says

    HI
    i left Scotland at 16 never worked at all
    was wondering if i can get pension
    and how to find out if i need to pay something or not

    • David Morris says

      Hello Karen, if you have a National Insurance number, you might be able to make some contributions. I need to know your date of birth

  165. Beth Gordon says

    I was born in the UK in 1954, finished school and started working when I was 15. I was in the WRAF for a while then married and had 2 children in the UK before emigrating to the USA at the age of 24 will I qualify for a partial UK pension when I reach retirement age next year?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Beth, yes, you should be eligible for a partial UK pension. You are also still able to make some back payments which would increase that pension. If you join us, we will send you an information package on how to go about doing that.

  166. I was born in America in 1951 but left when I was two years old as I worked in uk am now receiving a state pension but want to know if I am due any kind of benefit or pension from the states I am still an American and have American passport

    • David Morris says

      Hello Sue, sorry, I don’t know anything about the pension system in the US.

    • Kevin Bentley says

      I’m 99% sure you will have no entitlement to US Social Security (or any other benefit), as a minimum number of credits is required to qualify. Credits accrue based on earnings in the US. My wife, who is a US citizen, worked several years there before relocating to the UK and she has not earned enough credits to qualify.

  167. Hi David,

    thanks for this helpful Info on the UK pension system. I currently live and work in Germany, but my company wants me to work in the UK for 1 year. Therefore I was offered a UK contract for that time. Since I would not pay into the German pension system for that time it would be interesting to know if I will get any British pension at all for that time. I understand I would not get anything for that time, is that correct? I was born in January 1983.

    Thank you
    regards
    Bijan

    • David Morris says

      Hello Bijan, unfortunately, I don’t know the answer to that question, as the EU rules for pension harmonisation are quite detailed. As a general rule, if you will be contributing to the UK system while you are there, then you should be entitled to a UK pension for that period

    • Josephine patalinghug says

      Hi David,
      I am a naturalised British citizen but not gone to the UK for 2 years and a half. I worked as a NHS nurse for 13years. How can I apply for state pensin when the time comes. I am 59 years of age. I can apply for volountary class A or Class B as well. How can I go about it.? Thank you so much!

      Regards,
      Josephine

      • David Morris says

        HI Josephine, my best advice is for you to join us. We will send you a complete information package on what to do next. We also keep our members fully informed on changes to the pension system, and are fighting on your behalf to have the state pension indexed to inflation. You can join right on our website by following this link
        https://www.britishpensions.com/joinrenew/

  168. Gina Running says

    Hi I Ieft the UK in 2001 to live in Canada, I only worked a few years in the UK so I don’t think I would get any state pension, but my late Husband did work there, would I be entitled to anything.
    Thanks

  169. Larry Allan says

    Born in uk in 1952 worked from 15 to 35 before leaving to live in Australia. How do i reciebe pension

  170. Hi both myself and my husband uk born 1964 and 1965. both worked in uk from 1980 to 1999 before moving to Ireland.
    I had a state pension which is now frozen. My husband is a little more complicated as he opted out of serps with a private pension for a couple of years in the early 90’s then just stop paying this private pension. we are both now in public pension funds in Ireland from 2003 which will continue to retirement. I know I will get my public service uk pension, but what will my husband be entitled to? Is it worth paying back years in uk when he will get the irish public service pension with 30 years service ?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Ger, as you live in Ireland, the pension rules are harmonised within the EU. To be honest, I do not know all the details of those rules. Our website specializes in pensioners who live in frozen pension countries. I know that he will get credit for any years worked in the UK, and that will form part of his overall pension. I do not know if EU rules will allow him to make back payments to the UK pension, if he is living in another EU country and contributing there.Perhaps he can, and if so, it would be worth doing. I can only suggest you contact the DWP in the UK

  171. Alison Grundy says

    Hello,

    Retirement is on my radar! I was born in May 1961 and worked from July 1977- May 1987 and then from 2000 – 2002 in the UK. The rest of the years I have worked (and still do) in Canada. I’m fairly certain I will qualify for the state pension in UK. What age will I qualify? Do you have any idea of what my pension would be? (is it a monthly payment?).

    Should I be writing to the UK government for answers?

    Thanks you in advance for any assistance you can provide.
    Sincerely,
    Alison

    • David Morris says

      Hello Alison, yes, you are entitled to a partial UK state pension. You will reach pension age in 2028. You need 35 years of contributions to receive a full pension, but you still are able to make contributions from Canada to get you close to the maximum pension.
      The amount you receive will be based on the number of years you have, and the pension amount applicable in 2028. To give you an idea, a full pension in 2018 will be £126 a week, paid monthly. This will increase each year, and you will get whatever the 2028 amount is. If you join us, we will give you a complete information package on how to get a pension forecast, make voluntary payments from abroad, and lots of other valuable information

  172. My mum used to live in the UK from 1964 – 1970.(born in 1945) She worked and did odd part-time jobs. She can’t remember her NI number either. She moved abroad in 1970. Will she be eligible or can she apply for a pension in the UK? My dad used to live in the UK too and like my mum, moved abroad in 1970. He passed away 6 years ago. Can my mum claim a widowers pension?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Eddie, your mum and dad are of the age group that they needed 10 or 11 years respectively of work contributions to the pension scheme. Your mum does not qualify herself, based on what you tell me, but I don’t know how many years your dad worked. If he worked 11 years, then he would have been entitled to a partial pension, and your mum would also be eligible for a widows pension

  173. Alice Silvestri says

    Hello,

    I worked in Uk for 6 years then I moved back to my country in Italy in 2014 (I am 31 years old). Am I able to get any future pension? If yes, how do I apply for it? Do I need E205/GB model?
    Thank you.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Alice, as you are in an EU country, your pension comes under EU rules. Under current rules, your work experience in the UK would qualify you for a partial UK pension. You can only apply once you reach pension age. With Brexit, these rules might change, and I have no idea what may happen then

  174. Allan Dolby says

    Hello David,

    I was born in UK in 1970, never worked in the UK as we emigrated to Canada in 74. Is there an option to PAY into Pension even though I have never worked in the UK…? Is there any benefit at this point?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Allan, no. You have to have a National Insurance number, and you can only get that if you worked in the UK

  175. I was born in Scotland and started work when I was 15 I worked continuously until I was 26 then went abroad I never worked in the UK again. I live abroad. Will I receive a pension?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Brian, yes you are eligible to receive a partial UK pension. Depending on your age, you may even be able to increase it by making additional payments from abroad. Please note that you won’t receive it automatically. You have to apply for it

  176. Good day:
    My situation is that my parents moved me to England when I was three and I have never been back since.

    How can I make myself eligible to receive a pension when I retire? How much per year will I have to contribute to bring things up to speed. I was born in 1966 and didn’t even know that I had this option.

    Thank you for your assistance and I appreciate your time.

    • David Morris says

      Hello, C Paris. I don’t understand your question. You say your parents moved you to the UK when you were 3. Did you mean that they moved you FROM the UK ? If so, then you would not be eligible to apply for any pension

  177. Dear David
    I have worked in U.K. For last 12 years ( so was my wife) we left due to Brexit and we where wondering if there is anyway to access our pension founds early? Not as a pension but one of payment?
    From what I can understand this is not possible – but could you advise?
    If not – are there any ways we can claim it before our pension age at all?
    Many thanks

    • David Morris says

      Hello Piotr, you can not claim your state pension as a lump sum. Nor can you claim it ahead of your pension age. It can only be claimed on reaching pension age, as a regular payment

  178. Hi,

    I’m German and been living and working in the UK for the last 4 years. Born in April 1987. I may move to another country to live and work there and I am pretty far away from the 10 years to qualify. Is there anything I could do to not lose the contributions I made over the last 4 years? Is it worth/possible making voluntary contributions for the next presumably 6 years to qualify for a partial pension?

    Thanks for some brief advice!!:)

    KR
    Toby

    • David Morris says

      Hello Toby, yes, you can certainly make voluntary contributions from abroad. Financially it makes sense to do that.

    • MARY KICHAMU says

      Hello i am a Kenyan citizen. I came to the UK in 2002 to study and stayed on until 2009. I receive my pension statements. Is it possible for me to apply for UK citizenship to continue growing my pension.

      • David Morris says

        Hello Mary, you do not need to be a UK citizen to make voluntary contributions from abroad. If you join us, we will send you an information package on how to continue to make pension contributions

  179. cochrane kerr says

    hi iworked inthe uk from1971 till 2000 when will i get the pension and aprox how much please

    • David Morris says

      Hello Cochrane, you will get your pension when you reach pension age, but you have to apply for it. It doesn’t happen automatically. The amount you get will be based on the number of years of National Insurance credit you have, and the pension amount for the year that you claim it

    • Hello I’m just 11 years old my Father is a British Citizen age 65 he died in the Philippines. Can I ask assistance for children pension ? Do I’m qualified ?

  180. Ann Bevins says

    Hello, I was born in Scotland and lived there until 1982 when I left to work overseas. I am now a US citizen. I worked in Scotland for approximately 10 years and the companies I worked for had superannuation, pension plans, etc. My DOB is 10/1/1954. Will I be eligible for a UK pension and if so, when do I apply and what do I need to do? Thank you in advance for your help. Ann

    • David Morris says

      Hello Ann, you will need 10 years of NI contributions to qualify for a minimum state pension. It looks like you may already have it. You can also continue to contribute to that pension from the US, and can even make some back dated payments. This will increase your pension amount. You should definitely consider this. My best advice is to join us. We will send you a complete information package on what to do next. You can join right on this site. In terms of work pensions, everyone is different, and you would need to contact your previous employers for details.

    • Carmel Murphy says

      Hi I lived in the UK from October 1988 to November 1997 and paid pension contributions through my work for approx 7 years and also NI contributions. Is it possible to buy into my pension now. Many thanks

  181. Hi – I am Irish. I lived in the UK from around 1987 to 1995 and worked with one employer for the entire period. I would have paid pension contributions at that time. How do I go about finding out how much I paid and how I can access that money. If I have to top up how do I do that??

    • David Morris says

      Hello Angela, you will need 10 years of pension contributions to qualify, and you sound like you are pretty close. If you join us, we will send you a complete information package by email which will explain everything you have to do, including getting a pension statement, and how to top up. If you don’t do anything to get to 10 years, you will lose all the years you already contributed, so you don’t want that to happen – especially as you may have almost got the 10 years already. You can join right on this site.

  182. Tina Lovell says

    Hello David,

    Wondering if you could help me. I will be 64 in June of 2018.. I have written to you before and on your advice I made ‘top up’ payments regarding state pension in the UK. I have been told by the pensions department in UK that I now have 32 qualifying years, as of this year. Could you please let me know if I can still ‘top up’ my pension to try and get to the 35 years required and make payments to qualify for future years, until I reach retirement age in UK? Any information would be greatly appreciated. Thank you for all your advice in the past.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Tina, can I suggest that you join us ? We are a not for profit group, staffed by volunteers, who support UK expats living abroad with their pension queries. We will send you a complete package of information that should give you all the info you need. Our office is also available to answer questions from our members, and provide help where needed

  183. Hello

    I was in the UK from OCT 2010 to DEC 2013 as an international student. During that time period, I worked and contributed NIC. I am back in Mauritius and I am not going back to UK.

    What can I do to get my contributions back?

    • David Morris says

      hello Anish, you can not get contributions back. What you can do is continue to make contributions from abroad so that you qualify for a UK pension

  184. Hello David

    I read the criteria for the pension. I am a UK citizen but no longer live in thee UK, how would i go about getting my employment history to what i qualify for? I was born in the UK in 1956. I will be in the UK next week.. are there any forms i need to pick up etc? I appreciate the help. Please send response to my email address.

    Many thanks

  185. hello david, my husband lived in England for 11 year and he is getting a pension but he is living in Canada now. he lived in England 1962 to 1971 . then he moved to Canada. I live in u.k. 4 month I work only few month on cash money. am I entitlement to pension because my husband work there. please help.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Rupi, it depends on your age. If you have not yet reached pension age, then you will not be able to get a spousal pension once you reach pension age. If you reached pension age before April 2016, then you would be entitled

  186. Daisy Robinson says

    I am a bout to acquire Spanish nationality. Under current regulations, will I still receive my UK pension plus healthcare? thanks

  187. hello, I got married in England 1983, worked for nearly 3 years. my husband was born England, and worked lived there until late 1985. he passed away 3 years ago. he was born 23/7/1952. would I have any entitlement due to my husband’s entitlement as he is now deceased?

  188. Madeleine Cannon says

    I am now 78 & have been receiving my UK pension for 15 years after retiring to Nepal in 1991, thus my pension is “frozen” at the rate when I began receiving it, making life at present very difficult, as the cost of a continuing legal visa is expensive. I am therefore considering the possibility of taking Nepali citizenship – if I do so, will I still be entitled to my pension, as I have no intention of returning to the UK (I am a Buddhist nun). To date I have found no information concerning this query on the Internet.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Madeleine, citizenship does not matter for pension eligbility. You will continue to receive your UK pension regardless of your citizenship

  189. 11 September 2017 at 10:57 am
    Your comment is awaiting moderation.
    I was born in England 1954, worked till I left in 1982, I now live in America. Would like to understand my pension rights. Plus if I can top up and the worth of that. Just turning 63 Sept 24.

  190. Hello,

    I am a Polish citizen, born in 1963. I lived and worked in the UK for 7 years (between 01/07/2001 and 31/07/2008), I then relocated to Belgium, before moving back to Poland in June 2014. I was employed during this period and my UK employer was paying my NI for the entire period of my employment.

    From what I understand, the time of my employment in the UK would be taken into account for calculating my overall qualifying years in Poland, but I would like to explore various options including full pension in Poland or perhaps applying for partial UK pension. If partial UK pension is an option at all – what are my options of “buying” additional qualifying years?

    I will reach UK pension age in year 2030, so it’s still a long way to go, nevertheless I would like to explore all my options in advance. Obviously, under provision that things are changing as we speak, so right now it is only theoretical issue.

    I would appreciate your advice in this matter.

    Kind regards

    • David Morris says

      Hello Beata, as you live in the EU, you come under their pension rules. As pensions are harmonised, what that means is that your final pension will be made up of pensions from any EU countries you worked in, for the years you worked there. Essentially, you will get a partial pension from the UK, plus one from Poland. Other than that, I am not familiar with all the details of EU pensions. I believe you will get a single pension from Poland, but it will be made up of amounts paid by all the countries you worked in

  191. Denise Pusateri says

    Hello I am a British citizen living in the USA. I worked in the UK from July 1969 until December of 1979. I was born in February 1954. My question is am I eligible for any kind of pension and if so, what is the process for obtaining it.
    Thank you in advance for any assistance.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Denise, yes, it sounds like you already qualify as you will need 10 years, and it looks like you have that. The good news is that you can continue to make contributions to the UK system from abroad, which will increase your pension.
      My best suggestion is for you to join us. We will send you a complete package of information on what to do next

  192. Hello, my husband and I were both born in UK (1962 and 1964) and both worked there from 1980 to 1992 when we moved to Canada. From what I am reading we will qualify for a partial pension but would we benefit from making additional contributions?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Marian, yes, you would certainly benefit from making additional contributions. The return on the investment is very high – it is a really good financial deal.

  193. Nina Houghton (was Wilson) says

    I was born in the UK in 1960 and worked in England for 6 years from 1976 to 1982. I then left and lived and worked in Bermuda (a British Territory) from 1982 to 1993. I now live in Canada. I realize I need ten years work in the UK to qualify for a pension but is Bermuda and their pension system connected to the UK in any way??

    I look forward to any information you can provide.
    Many thanks

    • David Morris says

      Hello Nina, there is a reciprocal agreement between the UK and Bermuda that will allow contributions in either country to be counted towards a pension. This means that your Bermuda contributions should be counted towards your UK pension.
      You also can make contributions from Canada directly to the UK scheme, which will further increase your pension

      • I was born in England 1954, worked till I left in 1982, I now live in America. Would like to understand my pension rights. Plus if I can top up and the worth of that. Just turning 63 Sept 24.

        • David Morris says

          Hello Alan, you will need 10 years to qualify for a minimum pension. Yes, you can certainly top up, and it is really worth it – especially if you don’t already have 10 years. If you join us, we will send you a complete package of information, including how to top up, how much it will cost, and what you get for that

      • Nina Houghton (was Wilson) says

        Many thanks David. I appreciate the information. Can you provide information on what I will need to do next and how I go about it in order to qualify for a pension at retirement age. Such as how to top up, how do I find my SI # etc.

        Many thanks in advance.
        Nina Houghton

  194. AJIT S GREWAL says

    I am british citizen ,born in india. now I live in usa. I worked in uk from age of 16yrs to 37th ie 21 yrs my dob is 07/08/1950 . aprox how much pension will I qualify for . iwas pharmacist in uk as well as now in usa. I lost my NIH CARD. HOW DO I APPLY FOR MY PENSION PLEASE

    • David Morris says

      Hello Ajit, you are certainly entitled to a partial UK pension, and you can make some top up contributions from the US to increase it. You need 30 years to receive the full pension. If you have less than that, the amount you receive is simply prorated based on the number of years you do have. Your pension will also be backdated to the date you reached pension age, in 2015.
      My best advice is for you to join us. We will send you a complete information package, including how to obtain your NI number, apply for your pension, and make top up contributions.

  195. Lisa Betts says

    Good day,
    I was born in Canada in 1960, parents moved us to the UK in 1964 and I moved back to Canada in 1986. I have a National Insurance Card (somewhere!) and did work off and on in my teens and 20s. How do I find out if I am (a) eligible for a pension and (2) how to top it up? Thanks so much, Lisa

    • David Morris says

      Hello Lisa, you likely are entitled to a partial UK pension, and the good news is that you also are able to top it up from Canada.
      My best advice is to join us. We are a non profit volunteer group that supports UK pensioners living in Canada and abroad. If you join us, we will send you a complete package of information on how to find out your pension status, and make top up payments from abroad. The cost to join is minimal – $25 a year – and we keep our members informed of the latest developments in UK pensions.

  196. Hi David I was born in England 1956 and worked on and off for 3 yrs and then moved to Canada..I am planning to return in the next couple of years to live as all my family still reside there. We have Old age security starting at 65, which is automatic and not based on if you have worked or not, is there anything similar to this in England…thanks

    • David Morris says

      Hello Jocelyn, to be honest, I am not current on what else is available in the UK, other than the basic state pension.
      The good news is that it is very possible that you could qualify for the state pension in the UK. You will need 10 years of contributions, but you are eligible to make contributions from Canada which will get you to the minimum you need

  197. Frank Byrne says

    Hello, I was born on 1953 in the UK and worked there for 3 years before leaving to go to the USA. My plan is to retire at 66 and return to the UK. Do I qualify for any kind of pension and if I don’t have enough years can I make up for the years needed.

    • David Morris says

      hello Frank, you will need 10 years of NI contributions to qualify for a pension. The good news is that you can contribute from abroad, and can make back payments up to 10 years. Don’t delay in doing this, though, as you will lose the ability to buy back years over time

  198. My brother (born 1946) receives a full UK state pension. He moved to South Africa (Johannesburg) in 2001 and married a German lady he met there in 2006. She has lived in South Africa for 30 years or more. She already receives a widow’s pension from Germany. My question is, will she be eligible to receive a married woman’s pension being now married to my brother but never having lived or worked in the UK?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Liz, if she reached pension age prior to April 2016, she should be entitled to a spousal pension based on your brothers pension record. It doesn’t matter if she never lived in the UK.

      • She is 73 years of age. Will she need a National Insurance Number? My brother worked for 46 years. Approximately, how much will she received and will it be backdated?

        • They have no plans of returning to the UK to live…not sure if I made this clear earlier.

        • David Morris says

          Hello Liz, her pension would be approx 60% of what your brother is receiving, and it would be backdated to when she reached pension age. It doesn’t matter where they live, they are entitled to the pension

  199. Hello, I am an Italian citizen. I have worked in the UK between 1997 and 2012. I have then continued to contribute for an extra year when I returned to Italy. I am 46 years old. Will I be entitled to a pension when I reach 66? Would it be advisable to continue to make voluntary contributions? Thanks

    • David Morris says

      Hello Grelle, as you live in Italy, you come under EU rules for pensions. Under current rules any year worked in any EU country counts towards a pension, so your UK contributions would be counted. With Brexit, I have no idea if the rules will change. It may make sense for you to continue to contribute to the UK scheme, to reach the 10 years minimum that you would need if you didn’t live in the EU. That said, I am not knowledgeable in the rules on Italian pensions.

  200. Felicity Menzies says

    Hello David,
    I was born in 1960 and worked full time in London from August 2007- November 2010 and paid into the Pension fund so have a NI number. When I arrived back in Australia I looked into transferring the funds but it was going to cost more than contributions to transfer over and set up a QROPS.
    Do you know what my options are regarding reclaiming this money? I am not going to make contributions to get full pension as I can do that in Australia. Do I have to wait till I am 65 to get a part payment? And has the law changed in UK so that one must have worked 10 years to get any payment?
    thanking you!

    • David Morris says

      Hello Felicity, the UK state pension can not be transferred into a QROPS or any other scheme. Only private pensions can be transferred. You can not reclaim the money either. All you can do is receive a pension when you reach pension age. You will need 10 years for a minimum pension, so if you don’t want to lose the contributions paid so far, you should make voluntary contributions from abroad to at least get you to 10 years.

  201. John Macnamara says

    I was born after 6th April 1951 and worked for 5 years in the UK. I also worked in the EU and have claimed Unemployment Benefit both in the EU and the UK .

    Can i use these periods of work /unemployment benefit in the EU to achieve a total of 10 years of contributions that are now necessary for eligibility?

    • David Morris says

      Hello John, it depends on where you end up living. If you are in the EU, then all years count towards pension eligibility. If you live outside the EU, then you would have to meet the eligibility requirements of each individual country – so you would need 10 years in the UK

  202. Hello, I am Bulgarian, 56 years old, just came in UK for the first time. I wonder can I start now to work 3 years, then buy 10 years class 2 for about 1500 pounds and then wait until my 67 to receive approximately 1/3 of UK pension?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Natasha, if you are working in the UK, you will automatically be making contributions to the pension fund. You will not be able to buy back years before you were in the UK, but you can contribute each year going forward. Class 2 is being phased out, so you would only be able to make Class 3 contributions

  203. Anton Lito says

    Dear David, I am receiving a British pension after having paid contributions for 30 years. I am not British, and I currently receive the pension within the EU.The NHS also pays for the medical needs for myself and my family. My question is…what will happen to my pension after Brexit? I have tried to ask the EU, but none has come back and as you can imagine I am a little nervous. Could you help? Thank you for your time.

    • David Morris says

      hello Anton, I can’t really help you as the details of Brexit have not yet been resolved. My understanding is that the UK Government intends to keep paying the pension as before, but nothing has been formally agreed

  204. Scott Addison says

    Hi David,
    I am an 25 year old Australian living and working in the UK and should get three qualifying years on my National Insurance record before moving back home. If I continue to make voluntary contributions for another seven years from abroad, will that mean that I am entitled to any pension? And is there a limit on the number of years that you make voluntary contributions for? For example, 3 years working in the UK, 32 years of voluntary contributions from abroad = full state pension.
    Thanks

    • David Morris says

      Hello Scott, yes, you can continue to contribute from abroad for the whole of your life. There is no limit.

  205. Shelgah Hawkins says

    Hello, My name is Shelagh Mary Hawkins and I am a British Citizen and passport holder. I was born in the UK and paid taxes for 9 years only before as part of my nursing i had to go overseas for training. I then got married and have lived over seas every since and didn’t pay any contributions. I am now 82 and I have been trying to see if I am eligible for any pension or widowers pension since my husband some time ago. I presently live in Tanzania with my daughters. They have been helping me to look online to see if I am eligible for any form of pension but its rather confusing and I wonder if you can help. Kind Regards, Shelagh

    • David Morris says

      Hello Shelagh, you would need 10 years of contributions to qualify. Its possible that you may have that, depending on the exact dates you worked there. You may also qualify for a widows pension, depending on how long your husband worked there.
      If you join us, we will send you an information package on how to find out whether you are eligible, and how to apply if you are.

  206. Maureen Boyce says

    My husband and I are Brtish but moved to Canada in 1982. He had worked around 8 years and I had worked around 6 years. How much would he need to pay (roughly) to buy an additional 2 years. And is it worth me buying an additional 4 years or am I better to take the 60% of his which comes to me at retirement age without me contributing. Is it worth paying into or not?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Maureen, you don’t give your age, but if you have not yet reached pension age, then you will not receive 60% of your husbands pension. Spousal pensions were eliminated in 2016. You only receive a pension based on your own contributions. It is certainly financially worthwhile to do this. In terms of cost, it depends on whether you can qualify for Class 2 contributions. these are much cheaper than the normal class 3, which cost about £800 to buy back 1 year. Don’t delay in making a decision though, as you will lose the ability to make back contributions over time. If you join us, we will send you a complete package of information on how this all works

  207. Sheena Grant says

    Dear Sir

    I wonder if you can help me with something. I moved to the UK in 1965 when I was 6 years old from Guernsey and started full time work in 1975 when I was 16. I stopped work in 1982 to have my first child then returned to Guernsey in 1986. Please can you advise whether any of the years when I was claiming child allowance for my daughter, when I wasn’t working, contributes towards making up the ten years please. If not am I correct in thinking I need to make up four years contributions to receive a pro-rata UK pension?

    Many thanks
    Sheena Grant

    • David Morris says

      Hello Sheena, yes, the maternity years can count towards pension contributions. This could get you to the 10 years you need, otherwise you would have to make up the difference. It is certainly worth pursuing this.
      If you join us, we will send you information on how to get a pension forecast, and find out how many years you have accrued

  208. Victoria Winter says

    Hi there,

    Firstly, thank you so much for your time to write up this information and to reply to all these posts.

    My parents ad British Citizens.

    My Father: Worked in England for 10 years. Lived and worked in Australia for 14 years. Lived and worked in New Zealand for 25 years. receives the New Zealand Pension.

    My Mother: Lived in Australia for 7 years. Lived and worked in New Zealand for 25 years and is now 62 years old. The retirement age in New Zealand is 65. She receives a dependents pension as a benefit of my fathers New Zealand Pension.

    They want to move back to England and receive a pension there.

    Can they use the years that they worked in New Zealand and Australia to apply State pension in England?
    Can I facilitate this process for them by representing in England them as Power of Attorney?
    If they are are eligible for a British pension, would they be able to reside in the EU and receive that pension there (before any rule changes due to Brexit)?

    Thanks you so much in advance.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Victoria, your father should be able to claim a partial UK pension for the time he worked there. I do not believe there is a reciprocal agreement between UK and NZ, where NZ work credit can be used to qualify for a UK pension, so your mother would not be eligible for any UK pension. They may be able to continue to receive the NZ pension while in the UK, but I am not an expert in NZ pension rules. You would need to verify that in NZ. Any UK pension that your father is entitled to can be paid in the EU.
      I don’t see why you could not complete the application form for your father, but I don’t know what the Power of Attorney rules are in the UK

  209. Dear David,

    I’m a British Citizen born in 1963 who have worked in the UK from 1988 to 1999, migrated to Trinidad to bring up our three kids. Now that they are adults I will be returning this year to London to look for work. How much contribution would I need to make to obtain the maximum pension?

    Kindest Regards
    Gary

    • David Morris says

      Hello Gary, you will need 35 years of contributions to obtain the maximum state pension. You can make up to 10 years back contributions right now, plus any years going forward. You do not need to be residing in the UK to do that

  210. Lynn Phillips says

    I am a British citizen, born in UK in 1966, and moved to Canada is 1977. I have never worked in the UK. is it possible for me to make contributions in order to qualify for a partial pension?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Lynn, no, you must have a National Insurance number to make contributions – which means you have to have worked in the UK at some point

  211. Hello,
    I was born in 1981 in the UK and worked there until 2010. I’ve checked my contributions and have made 10 years worth of contributions, so it looks like I’ll be eligible to claim state pension when I get to age 68.
    Since 2010 I’ve been living in Australia and now have dual citizenship. I have no intention of ever moving back to the UK, but you can never say for sure what may happen.
    From my understanding if I continue and do nothing I’ll be eligible and will receive approx. GBP 52.73 per week.
    I can’t really afford to make extra contributions at the moment – is there a timeframe where I can make these contributions? How many years back can I pay? I thought I only needed 35 years of contributions for a full pension, but it says I may need to make contributions until 2049?
    Does it make any difference which years to pay? From what I see in the past the contributions are less so it would make sense to pay those rather than future ones which would likely be higher? Also are catch up contributions made from pre-tax income or after-tax?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Chris, lots of good questions. You will only need 35 years of contributions. There is no point in contributing more. You normally have 6 years to pay a given year – so if you wanted to pay for 2017, you would have up to 2023 to pay for that year. That means you can effectively go back 6 years from today. There is a special provision where you can go back 10 years, because of the new legislation in 2016.
      I can’t speak to the tax situation in Australia, but in Canada, contributions are after tax.
      If you join us, we will send you a complete information package, including how to make voluntary contributions

  212. Dear David,

    I am 62 years old. I worked in the UK for 2 1/2 years. I returned to Canada in 1997. Would I qualify for UK pension?

    Thanks.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Irene, you will need 10 years of work contributions to qualify. You are able to make contributions from abroad that should get you there.

  213. Jocelyn Stevens says

    Hi

    I am a 59 year old South African and will be moving to the UK on an ancestry visa this year. I will be getting a job and contributing towards the NI. Would I qualify for a UK pension upon retirement?

    My husband, who is 65 will be joining me in approximately a year’s time and also intends working in the UK – would he also qualify for a UK pension?

    Would we be able to make voluntary contributions?

    Thank you.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Jocelyn, you would need 10 years of contributions to qualify. Accordingly, it doesn’t look like you will be able to reach that number before you reach pension age. You will not be able to make any back contributions. Your husband definitely won’t qualify. There may be other benefits you qualify for, but it doesn’t look like you will be eligible for a pension

  214. Phyllis Eleftheriou says

    Hi There

    My husband and I are looking to relocate to England from South Africa. I am a British Citizen but neither of us have ever worked there. I am age 53 and my husband age 55. Can we get jobs, register for a National Insurance number and then begin contributing? My understanding is that we would have to do this for 10 years before qualifying? During that time can we make additional contributions?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Phyllis, yes – you can get jobs and begin contributing. You will need 10 years to qualify. You will not be able to make additional contributions. You can only contribute from the time that you get your NI number and start work.

  215. Sandra Kelemen nee: HAYWARD says

    I’m curious why someone has to work 10 years in the U.K. before they can collect their pension. I’ll be 78 this year, and I left the U.K. when I was 19. I worked for 4 years, and the National Insurance was always taken out of my paycheck. Why isn’t there any accounting for my loss?

    • David Morris says

      Hi Sandra, unfortunately those are the rules.People do have the option of continuing to make contributions even after they emigrated, to make up any shortfall. However, if you do not do that, then you will lose whatever contributions you had made

  216. Hi-
    I will be 65 in March, 2017…worked in the UK from 1970-76, then in Bermuda from 1977-1990..does my time in Bermuda count towards my UK pension (it’s a British Crown Colony)..? Do you have to work every month of the year for it to qualify as one of your ’10’? Thanks.

    • David Morris says

      Hi Kevin, your Bermuda contributions should go towards a Bermuda pension, but they will not apply to the UK state pension.
      You do not need to have worked the full year in the UK for it to be a qualifying year. Provided you earned over approx. £6,000 in the year, it will likely count as a qualifying year. You also have time to make additional voluntary contributions in the UK to make up any gap

  217. I came to Canada in 1976 with 8 qualifying years of NI contributions. I have worked full time in Canada since then but retired in 2015. I reach 65 in October 2017. So far, I’ve been able to get from the Newcastle Pensions Centre, the information about my 8 qualifying years, together with the statement that “adding further qualifying years to your NI contribution record may help you satisfy the rule” regarding 10 qualifying years. But I got little direction from them on how I can go about making the additional contributions. Their website is a labyrinth, especially now that they seem to cover both the “Old Pension” and the “New Pension” which applies to me. Do you have any advice on how I should now proceed, or where I might get clearer relevant information on making additional payments? Thanks

    • David Morris says

      Hello Ian, my best advice is for you to join us. We will send you a complete information package on UK pensions, including how to make contributions from abroad. We will also be fighting on your behalf to stop the discriminatory practice of freezing those pensions. You can join right on this website

      • I joined CABP in February! I was trying to follow your info package but was still experiencing the difficulties I described above. I still don’t know how to go about finding out how to make additional payments. I had e-mailed the DWP about a week ago asking for advice and they just replied saying I have to contact The Department of Revenue and Customs so I’ll try that route.

        • David Morris says

          Hello Ian, in the document we sent you, it gives the telephone number to call, and the form to be used, to make additional payments

  218. I was born in May 1953 and worked in the UK up until October 1977 when I left for Australia, so from what I can see I will not be enlargeable to get the pension, so can I do a top up and is it worth the bother? Thanks in advance.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Steve, you don’t indicate how many years you worked. You will need 10 years to qualify. It is certainly a good deal to make those extra top ups to qualify.

  219. m vincent says

    born in 1937 .had a n.h.i. # only worked for about12 to 14 months moved to u s a in 1957 am I eligible for a pension ?

  220. Dorothy McLarnon says

    Hello from Cairo, Egypt.

    I was born in N. Ireland in 1958. I worked from 1974 to 1977 and I’m sure I made contributions before I emigrated to Canada in 1977.

    I lived and worked in Canada from 1977 to 1980 and from 1988 to 1990. The rest of the time I have lived in Egypt.

    I am entitled to any kind benefits? Many thanks for your consideration.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Dorothy, you will need 10 years to qualify, however you are eligible to make contributions to the system from abroad. It is a good deal to do that, and you will then qualify for a partial UK pension

  221. Hello, Im italian and I’ve been working in UK for few years, at the moment I have 4 full years of NI contribution and from my account on HMRC website I can see I can make voluntary contributions in order to get to the minimum pension.
    Those contributions are around 750 pound per year, is it actually possible to get the minimum pension just paying this small amount of money per year? If so this could be a good investment..

    Thank you for your time and assistance.

  222. Clair Marriott says

    Hello David,
    I’m English I was born in 1959 and worked in the UK from 1975 to 1986 when I left for France to work and stayed. I know I have a small UK pension as I’ve enquired.
    What I would like to know is if I can add the 11 years I worked in the UK to the years I’ve worked in France towards my French pension.
    I thank you in advance for taking the time to answer me.
    Clair

    • David Morris says

      Hello Clair, yes you can. EU pensions are harmonised, so that all the years you worked in any EU country all count towards your final pension. When you apply for your pension in France, they will contact the UK to arrange for the English component to be paid

  223. Terry Barker says

    I was born May 1953, so am 65 in May 2018, I came to Canada in 2000 and have worked for over 15 years here continually, I worked in the UK for 30 years and paid extra to the UK when I came to Canada to “qualify” for maximum contributions. I believe claiming my OAS in Canada as soon as I am eligible is the best way to go but briefly looking at the OAS Forms, it seems any payment of UK pension affects my OAS?? , so should I/can I delay payment of my UK Pension, I was thinking if I calim the UK one of leaving it in UK pounds until the exchange rate improves? Really appreciate any views you can give

    • David Morris says

      Hello Terry, all income from any source counts towards any clawback of the OAS. Keep in mind that you need to be earning $73,715 before any clawback starts. At that level, you would lose 15% of any income over the threshold, up to the OAS amount
      Yes, you can delay receiving the UK pension, and your pension will increase for every year you delay. As to exchange rates, I have no idea which direction they will go. If you visit the UK regularly, then keeping the money in sterling will avoid any exchange issues

  224. NEELIMA Varma says

    Hi David,
    I am writing this for my Dad. My dad was born in 1942, he worked P&O for 5 years in England as a merchant navy officer and after 5 years, he worked with different shipping company’s in England. At that time he contributed for pension plan.Now he is 72 years, he is getting only 80 pounds a month. He asked the shipping company and government about this and they said my dad( he is an Indian ) is not a British citizen.

    After 35 years he is getting 80 pounds is ridiculous. If you have any suggestions or opinions , please let me know.
    Thank you.
    Neelima.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Neelima, your father would have reached pension age in 2006/2007. At that time, the max pension was either £4,380 or £4,500 per year, and you needed 44 years to get it. You needed 11 years to qualify for anything, so I assume your father had that. With 11 years, he would have received in 2006/2007 a pension of 1/4 the maximum amount. That would be roughly £1,120 a year, or £93 a month.
      The problem is that, depending on where he lives, his pension was frozen at that amount. He would not have received any increases.
      By the way, pension entitlement has nothing to do with citizenship – only the years contributed.
      It sounds like the calculation is approximately correct, but if you can tell me what his pension is based on, I can confirm it. He would have received a pension statement stating how the pension amount was calculated.
      Failing that, you can ask the DWPO for aan explanation of how the pension was calculated

  225. Andrew Loukes says

    Good day,

    I was born in 1962 and started working from age 16, (approx 1978) with periods of unemployment. I left the UK for South Africa in 1990. Am I eligible for a UK pension. I don’t have a record of my NI number. Is a top up option available? I know I have a few years to go, but would like to make plans now rather than later.

    Thank you.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Andrew, yes you are entitled to a UK pension, and yes, you can make top ups. It is smart of you to be thinking of this now.
      If you join us, we will send you an information package on how to get started, including getting your NI number and making contributions from abroad

    • Keith Robinson says

      Hi David. I started work aged 16 in 1971 and left for South Africa in 1981, how do I go about buying back into the UK pension fund and what forms do I require to fill in and where from

  226. Arnis Visnevskis says

    I worked in the UK from 2010 till november 2016 . Last year i moved back to Latvia. Will i get any pension from UK when i retire?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Arnis, yes – you are entitled to a pension from the UK when you retire

      • Paul Whiteley says

        Hi,

        Is this comment correct? I felt that a person needed 10 years of contributions to qualify, and the dates above would only be 6. I ask the question because I am in a similar position to Arnis.

        Paul

        • David Morris says

          Arnis lives in the EU. Pension rules are different there. In the EU all years count towards the end pension, and there is no minimum required

  227. Brexit could be an opportunity for the Canadian Government to achieve fairness and parity for people who receive their UK pensions in Canada. The UK will be seeking trading partners; indeed, UK politicians have been using Canada as one such country. The frozen UK pension issue should be part of those negotiations.

  228. Steven Stewart says

    I am a British citizen born and lived most of my life in UK, I am 72 and have never claimed my old age pension. If I make a claim now what if any back payments can I claim? I worked in the UK for 23 years and about the same in Norway. I now live in Thailand

    • David Morris says

      Hello Steven, your pension would be backdated to the day you reached pension age – 65. You would have the option of a lump sum, or an increased monthly pension.

  229. I live in Canada and am a Canadian citizen. I am also a Brirish citizen with a valid Insurance number, I worked in UK from 1977 to 1979. Do I qualify for any pension.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Khan, I am assuming you are not 65 yet. If so, then you will need 10 years of NI contributions to qualify. The good news is that you can make contributions from abroad, and can also make some back payments

  230. Daniel Krebs says

    Hello, I am 42 years old (British) and have lived in Japan for the past 15 years. I worked in the UK for about 2 years prior to that. What would I need to do I qualify for a UK pension? Thanks.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Daniel, you will need 10 years of contributions to qualify for a minimum pension. The good news is that you can make contributions from abroad, and also make some catch up contributions. Don’t delay though, as you gradually lose years over time

  231. F. Pastor-Pons says

    Hi,

    I have been working in UK from september 1995 to december 1998. I belong to those to retire after 2016 (official date will be 6 March 2020) Do I will have rigth to some partial retirement from the UK State Pension? Thank you for your help in this matter.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Fernando, you will need 10 years of NI contributions to qualify. You have the ability to make contributions from abroad, and may be able to make some catchup payments as well. It doesn’t look like you will be able to get to 10, though. It doesn’t hurt to enquire though.

  232. I am 66 years old, married and in receipt of an Australian pension and a part (aprox 50%) UK pension. For personal reasons I’m considering renouncing my Australian citizenship and returning to the UK. My wife will probably go back to her home country in SE Asia. If I renounce my Australian citizenship I will no longer be in receipt of an Australian pension. I guess I would have great difficulty trying to live in England on a part UK pension of around $80 a week. So I am wondering what can I do to ensure my pension is enough to live on (I have some money to invest in the UK pension scheme if necessary). Regards Mal

    • David Morris says

      Hello Mal, I don’t know why you think you will lose your Australian pension. Nor do I know why you think you need to renounce your Australian citizenship. I believe the Australian pension is paid wherever you live. In terms of your other questions, I can’t really help you. I have no idea what other benefits are available in the UK

      • C. Silva says

        Hello David,

        I have started working in the UK (NHS) in June 2016, but due to family issues I will have to return to my home country (Portugal) by the end of this year (around December).
        I was looking into the information on Gov.uk and it seems to say that I will be only entitled to contribute overseas once I’ve completed three continuous years living in the UK or have three years of National Insurance contributions. If I leave by the end of this year I will only have contributed for two fiscal years (2016 and 2017).
        I read a previous post here, saying that they had only contributed for two years, for which you have replied that they would still be entitled to keep paying contributions in order to complete the 10 year minimum.
        On the official info (gov.uk) I could only find that we are able to pay for gap years, not previous years, before e became UK residents (because if that could be a nice option).
        Could you please advise me: shall I apply now (by the end of the year, when a leave), or do I have to plan to return to the UK (e.g. six months) to complete three years of contribution so that I can become eligible?
        Note: I do not own a property in the UK. What kind of benefits (fiscal/citizenship) could I get from it?

        Many many thanks
        Silva

        • David Morris says

          Hello Silva, as you live in the EU, the rules are different. Pensions are harmonised across the EU. I don’t know what the EU rules are regarding contributions from abroad for the EU. I know that you do not need the 10 year minimum. You get credit for every year worked in the UK

      • Unfortunately the Australian Aged Pension ceases once you have been out of the country(Australia) for more than 6 weeks under this current government, and that even if its a holiday overseas, it used to be for max period of 6months

  233. Joy Lake says

    I was born in England in 1952. I worked full-time for about 3.5 years from leaving school in 1970 to emigrating to the US in 1974. I also had a couple of Saturday jobs prior to that but minimal income from those. Am I entitled to a partial UK pension?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Joy, yes you are entitled to a partial pension from the UK. You are also still able to make contributions from abroad if you want to increase that pension. We can give you complete information on all of this if you join us.

  234. Hello David Morris,
    I was born in 1957, was trained as state registered nurse with the National Health Service in England from 1974-1978. During the days of training ,I paid National Insurance for 4 years as trainee ,I left England after that. Am I entitle for any Pension ? I have lost my national insurance number. if so, how may I apply ?
    Thank you !

    • David Morris says

      Hello Chok, you will need 10 years of NI contributions to qualify for a minimum pension. The good news is that you can contribute from abroad, and you have time to build up the necessary contributions. If you join us, we will send you an information package on how to get started, including applying for your NI number

  235. Ray Hutt says

    Hi,

    I was born in the UK 21/5/48. I worked from age 15 until 21 when I migrated to Australia in Feb 1970. Any advice

    • David Morris says

      Hi Ray, you are entitled to a partial pension from the UK, and can also likely make a few back contributions to increase it slightly. If you join us, we will send you an information package on how to apply

  236. Mr.Vivien Buswell says

    I am British. Born in BMH hong Kong in 1956 father in British Army. lived in England from 1957 till 1975 grew up in England. worked from 1971 till 1975 4 years and 1 month in England,moved then to Germany.working in germany from 1975 till now ( 05/2017) got British and German Passport.what would i get on british Pension and what do i have to Pay. I am a 50% Invalied.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Mr Buswell, you will be entitled to a partial pension from the UK for the number of years you worked there. As you are in the EU, pensions are harmonized. That means that you would apply for a pension in the country you currently live in (Germany) and they would connect with the UK for details of your employment there. Your final pension will contain both German and UK amounts

  237. Hi, I am Polish national and I’ve lived and worked in the UK for 7 years, I left in 2012 to work until present in Dubai. I have been owning a property in the UK which is rented out since I left the UK, however I haven’t been paying any IN contribution since I have moved to Dubai. Can you please advise what are my chances to get the minimum state pension and if I need to pay voluntary contribution?

    Thank you in advance for your advise.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Agata, you will need to pay voluntary contributions to get you to the minimum of 10 years of contributions. The good news is that you can do that from abroad. If you join us, we will send you an information package on how to get started

  238. hi im a dual citizen Canadian and British i have both passports i was born 1958 i did work in Britain for about two years before emigrating to Canada in 1976 i have worked here for 40 years im thinking of moving back to Britain am i entitled to any pension

    • David Morris says

      Hello Andy, you are not yet entitled to a UK pension. You will need 10 years of contributions to the pension scheme to qualify. The good news is that you can actually make contributions from abroad, which will enable you to get to at least the minimum needed. This is definitely worth doing. If you join us, we will send you a complete info package on how to get started, including how to make contributions from Canada.

    • Carol La Camera says

      Dear David,

      I was born in Scotland in 1959, we moved to south africa in 1965. In 2008 we moved back and went to wales, i got a NI number but unfortunately after 4 months i could not find a job and had to come back to south africa. My son lives in England and we would like to pack up and move to England, I am 58 years old so i can work, would i be intitled to any benifits ? I would like to contribute to the UK pension scheme in the meantime, can you advise me please.
      thank you, Carol

      • David Morris says

        Hello Carol, yes, you should be able to make contributions from SA, as long as you have your NI number. This will allow you to build up pension credits. You can also buy back at least 6 years. You should get started on that as soon as possible. In terms of other benefits, I have no idea what is currently available in the UK, having been gone over 40 years. You would have to investigate that when you get there

  239. Liz Doolan says

    Dear David,

    I was born in Scotland in 1957. My parent immigrated to South Africa in 1963. I have never contributed any thing to the UK Pension. I will turn 60 this year but will only retire when I am 65. Is there a possibility I can contribute to the pension fund now. Both my Mom & Dad received UK pensions for the time they worked in the UK, as well as my Dad working and being in the army. Both my parents are now deceased. I would if I could like to retire in the UK, due to the unpredictable political situation in South Africa.

    • David Morris says

      hello Liz, unfortunately no. You need a National Insurance number to be able to contribute, and you can only get a National Insurance number if you are residing in the UK

  240. David Mitchell says

    I left the uk after working for 21 years. I now live in the USA and I have made no payments since 1990. Am I still eligible to collect a pension.

    Thanks David

    • David Morris says

      Hi David, absolutely. Your pension eligibility doesn’t expire. If you join us, we will send you an information package on how to apply for the pension. If you haven’t yet reached pension age, you can still make more contributions from abroad. This will increase your pension amount

  241. Joanna Massyn says

    Hi – I worked in the UK for two years in 1988 – 1991. I cannot remember my National Health No. Would I be eligible for a pension if I paid into it until I am 65 from South Africa. I am wanting to return to England next year to live. Can I make voluntary contributions from now?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Joanna, providing you have your National Insurance number, you should be able to make voluntary contributions from South Africa. If you join us, we will send you an information package on how to find your number, and how to make contributions from abroad

  242. karthik jampala says

    Dear david,
    My dad who is an indian citizen worked in the NHS for 7 years in ireland from 1986 to 1993 and four years in UK from 1993 to 1997. He then migrated to india after that and he always only had indian passport and he is 61 years old now. So my queires are Will he be able to claim any pension benefits ? Should I purchase any years so that he can get annual pension. Whats the best thing to do for him now.

    Many thanks
    Karthik

    • David Morris says

      Hello Karthik, I can not comment on the eligibility for a pension from Ireland, as I am not familiar with the rules for that. For the UK pension, he will need 10 years to qualify. The good news is that he can still make voluntary contributions from abroad, and can even buy back up to 6 years. That should easily get him to the minimum of 10, or more.
      If you join is, we will send you a package of information on how to make back payments, and request a pension statement from the UK. He should also check with the Irish pension agency, as he may well qualify for an Irish pensions as well.

      • karthik jampala says

        thanks for your immediate reply

        But he is above 60 now so would he be able to contribute to the pension fund and buy back years ?
        How much would it cost to buy an year ?
        How much pension he would get annually?

  243. Philip says

    I am 63 years old and was born and lived in the UK until I emigrated to Canada in 1979. I worked about 6 years in the UK prior to emigration and would like to know (a) would it be possible to make voluntary contributions to reach the 10-year threshold and (b) would the cost of any voluntary contributions be worth it. Thank you.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Philip, yes it is possible to make contributions to get you to at least the minimum 10 years, and yes it is definitely worth it. Keep in mind that if you don’t buy an extra 4 years to get to the minimum, you will lose the 6 years contributions you already made

      • Keith Robinson says

        Hi David, I started working in the UK at 16 (born 1955)1971 and left for South Africa in 1981, I came back to the UK in 2005 and worked for about 5 months before returning to SA. I would like to know how to buy back into the British pension fund

        • David Morris says

          Hello Keith, my best advice is for you to join us. We do have other SA members. We will send you an info package that will answer all your questions, and we are also available to help. Our primary mission is to convince the UK government to stop the selective discrimination of freezing some pensions but nit others, and we are all volunteers.

    • Michael Sculley says

      Hi

      I want to claim my pension even though I have only 13 years of service. So, where do I file in the North West of England, and is it worth it to add contributions? Furthermore, I am in the No 2 Category above!

      Thank you

      • David Morris says

        hello Michael, my suggestion is that you join us. We will provide you with a complete package of information on how to proceed – including how to claim and how to make additional contributions

  244. phill courtney says

    A question about wives pension (I’ve asked repeatedly at the Pensions Enquiry line, and received every permutation of answers). I have my full 30 years, and qualify for a full NI pension (dob 30/10/1950). Haven’t claimed it yet – it increases in value by 10% a year (as I’ve been advised). My wife is a New Zealand citizen – Dob 13/01/1953 – with scant or nil NI record, and so we both reached retirement age before April 2016. We married on 01/04/2017. Does my wife qualify for a wife’s pension?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Phill, the short answer is that I do not know. Normally, your spouse would be entitled to a spousal pension as you both reached pension age prior to April 2016 – however, you only got married on January 2017. I do not know if there are rules about spousal eligibility based on marriage after pension age. I can find no information about that. I can only suggest that you pursue this through the Pensions enquiry line, and also in writing.

  245. Dear David, I live now in Canada and am 63, I now have Canadian Citizenship, I paid into the UK I believe to be full contributions (All my Life). I do not have a current British Passport. Roughly how much is my entitlement at this time, and will I still be able to collect without a Current British Passport ? I have a Canadian One current..
    Many Thanks.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Bob, you do not need a British passport to collect your UK pension. If you made full contributions, your pension will roughly be about 170 pounds per week. It may vary a little from that, based on what it will be when you reach actual pension age

    • barry rowland says

      .
      I understand that I need 11 years NI contributions in order to qualify for a pension. I have oniy 10 years that I contributed and was told i did not qualify.My wife who is in the same age group is receiving a basic pension, as we topped up her contribution .
      My question: i understand spouses are eligible for up 60% of their spouses pension, does this apply to men, and is there another arbitrary cut off point, where certain age groups are denied.

      • David Morris says

        Hello Barry, I need to know your Date of birth before I can answer that

        • barry rowland says

          Hi David, I fall in the “born before 1945.” category, as does my wife. Could you explain the reason behind the UK, penalizing one age group over another. Having worked and paid NI for 10 years and being entitled to nothing, while those born a few years later need only to contribute to NI for one year, to be eligible for a pension, along with their spouses, seems grossly unfair.

          • David Morris says

            Hello Barry, it is unfair. The Government has changed the rules a few times, and there are always people who are negatively affected by the rule change.

          • barry rowland says

            Thank you David.
            I assume that those spouses, born before 1945, would also not be eligible for part of their spouses pension.

  246. Hi

    I am a Canadian Citizen who worked on contract in a post secondary institution in Dublin for 15 months back in 2005. Would I qualify for anything at my time of retirement?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Laura, Irish pensions come under EU rules, which are very different. You would need to contact the pension office in Dublin. I don’t have any expertise in EU pensions

  247. Hi David
    I was born in the Republic of Ireland on 14th April 1953, and my husband was also born in the Republic of Ireland on 16th August 1937. I never worked in the UK. He worked in the UK for approximately 19 – 20 years circa the late 1950s until March 1976. He was receiving a partial UK Basic State Pension from 2003, and was claiming for me from the start under this as a dependent. He received a letter in January 2016 stating that from 6th May 2016 he would no longer be able to claim for me as a dependent because I now qualified to claim in my own right from 6th May 2016, and a form would be sent. They never sent any form. The pension reduced down around £31.50 a week less. He passed away in November 2016 in the Republic of Ireland where we lived together the whole of our married life. I have tried to address this many times with the UK Pension Service and get nowhere. They have now told me that I am entitled to £4.38 per week.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Anne, based on your age, you come under the new rules in the UK that eliminated all spousal pensions. Under those rules, you would not be entitled to a pension based on your husbands entitlement, only in your own right. Unfortunately, if you never worked in the UK, you would not have any entitlement to a pension. You were misinformed when they said they would send a form. Sorry.

  248. justin ross says

    Hi David

    My name is Justin, I’ve been living and working in Spain for the past 24 yrs. Married to a local girl with two lovely daughters.
    Born in Birmingham ( England ) 47 yrs ago, served 4 yrs for my country of which I am entitled to a pension when reaching the grand old age of 60.
    The question in hand is this :
    With Brexit making waves in all kinds of directions, its more than likely , this year I will apply for Spanish Citizenship now
    Will this in any way affect my future army pension , if you could shed some light on the matter I would be most grateful.
    thanks

    • David Morris says

      hello Justin, I am afraid I have no idea what Brexit will do. I think it is very unlikely that it will affect your army pension, but nobody knows for sure

  249. Hi, I’ve paid NI for 28 years by working in the UK. I lived in Australia from 1980 to 1995. Does the social security reciprocal agreement rules between the 2 countries up to 2001 still apply to the New State Pension i.e. from now on? Under the rules for the previous state pensions, years spent living in Australia prior to 2001 counted towards your UK state pension.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Ian, regretfully I don’t know very much about the Australian reciprocal agreements. The new state pension did not change those agreements, as far as I know

      • I worked in england for 12 years, im i entitled to any pension i, now 61

        • David Morris says

          hello Mr smith, yes – if you worked in the UK for 12 years you would be entitled to a partial UK pension when you reach pension age. The good news is that you can still make voluntary contributions from abroad, which will increase that pension

  250. hi , i was a professional footballer with liverpool F.C from july 1978 up until feb/march 1980 am i entitled to any
    part pension i am 57 now .

    • David Morris says

      Hello Brian, if you live in Ireland, pensions come under EU rules – which means that any time spend working in any country in the EU is counted towards your ultimate pension. So you would be entitled to a part pension from the UK

  251. Ron Stephen says

    I’m an autistic 59 year old full British citizen who was born and raised in Canada. I worked all over the world but only lived in London once, for 4-5 months, looking for work that didn’t pan out. Being autistic I was able to function very well in my youth but that became less-so as I got older and I became unable to work at age 42. I was on a disability pension in Canada but when my father died I decided to move somewhere inexpensive. I’m now living on my savings in Chiang Mai, Thailand at 10,000 baht a month but that is unsustainable in the long run without any income. If I am careful I can maintain this standard of living for about 15 more years. As my father was 95 when he passed away I need to plan for twice that.

    Can you tell me if there are any benefits I will be eligible for if I stay here and, also, do you know of somewhere in the EU I could relocate to where I could get enough benefits to have an acceptable quality of life?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Ron, unfortunately, I simply do not have the information you are looking for. This website supports expats receiving the UK state pension. If you never worked in the UK, you would not be entitled to a state pension. I don’t know what other benefits may be available

  252. sharyn henry says

    Dear David,

    I lived and worked in the UK for about seven years between 1986 and 1993 but did not make any voluntary contributions.
    Do I qualify for a partial pension once I retire?

    Kind regards

    • David Morris says

      Hello Sharyn, if you worked in the UK, your employer would have made contributions to National Insurance on your behalf. You did not need to make voluntary contributions at that point. To get a partial pension, you will need 10 years of contributions. If you have credit for 7, then you will need to make voluntary contributions for 3 more years. You can do that easily from abroad.
      If you join us, we will send you an information package on how to get started

  253. Hi,

    I was reading other questions today and I see many gave more info than I did in my last post, so here goes again.
    I spent 4 years in the UK on a student visa (EU citizen) during which I worked and paid in National Insurance, that was 2007.-2010. When I left the UK I continued working for the UK company from abroad. I dont work full hours so I am not sure what a qualifying year is? Because sometimes my Ni contribution is deducted from my pay and some months when the pay is too low it is not deducted. I have worked like this since 2011, from abroad. So all together I have been working for UK company, from UK or abroad, since 2007, I am still working for them. I am not UK self employed. I just work for them from abroad now.
    Well, I see that this service is for Canadian citizens, but thought I d give it a try as I am not clear about this from what I read on the UK websites. I thought I Had to be at least self employed in the UK for these contributions to count.
    Thank you for your help in advance 🙂

    • David Morris says

      Hello Rebeka, our website is for people entitled to a UK pension outside of the UK, so no worries.
      To be counted as a qualifying year for pension purposes, you need to have earned (and made NI contributions on those earnings) of £8,167 per year as an employee, or £6,025 as self employed. Those are the most recent numbers for this year. They would have been less in previous years. As long as you earned those amounts in a year, it would qualify as a credit for pension purposes. You can easily find out by applying for a pension statement. If you join us, we will send you a package of information on that, and other items, such as making voluntary contributions from abroad

  254. Oliver Warwick Broome says

    Dear David,
    I was born in S Africa in 1975 but I am a UK citizen by descent. I lived in the UK for four years when I was a child. ( Aged 3 to 7 ). Upon leaving college in SA I returned to the UK in 1993 and worked for 10 months. The day before I left the UK for SA I was working and I started work ( self employed ) within a week of arriving in SA. I recently applied to
    pay class 2 voluntary contributions but was told that I could only pay Class 3. What should I do.
    regards
    Oliver

    • David Morris says

      Hello Oliver, if you have been told that you can only pay Class 3, then all you can do is appeal. The UK Government is intent on phasing out Class 2 all together, so I wouldn’t be very hopeful.

  255. Ronnie Smith says

    MY sister was married to a British citizen for 25 years. He was a soldier for 18 yrs in the British army and she receives a pension for his militarty service. is she eligible for a British pension other than the soldiers benefit which he paid extra for while in the service.
    Is she eligible for the British retirement as she was a naturalized British Citizen

    • David Morris says

      Hello Ronnie, soldiers are entitled to the UK state pension, as well as the service pension. If your sister reached retirement age prior to April 2016, then she would be entitled to a state pension based on his National Insurance contributions. That pension would be roughly 60% of his state pension. Her citizenship doesn’t matter

    • Morag Herre says

      My parents were both receiving British Pensions for a few years and for some reason cancelled them. My dad passed away 3 years ago but my mom is still alive and now wants to reapply for her pension and to see if there would be anything for her from my father’s pension. Is this possible and how do I go about helping her to do this?

      • David Morris says

        Hello Morag, you can’t cancel the British state pension. What may have happened is that your parents received a “life certificate” which they had to sign and return to prove they are still alive. If they did not return that form, the pension is stopped. It will be reactivated, with back pay, once the form is completed. You need to contact the dept of Works and pensions in the UK and let them know the situation

  256. WILLIAM MAGUIRE says

    Hello,

    I am 63 years old and a US citizen. I will be 65 in January of 2019. I worked in the UK from 1979 until 1985 and payed into the system. Am I entitled to a pension?

    Bill Maguire

    • David Morris says

      Hello Bill, you will need 10 years of contributions to qualify, so you are not quite there yet. The good news is that you can make voluntary contributions from the US, which will get you to the 10 that you need. This is definitely worth doing financially

      • WILLIAM MAGUIRE says

        Thanks for your reply David. Can I make these payments as a lump sum to get me there? And, how do I find out ho much I have to pay?

        Bill

        • David Morris says

          Hello William, you can buy back up to 10 years, and pay those in a lump sum. If you join us, we will send you an information package on how to go about doing that

  257. Mike Robb says

    I am hearing rumours regarding NI contributions whilst serving in the UK Armed Forces. The years you serve in the Armed Forces are being classed as “contracted out” and so do not count for the full pension. Is there any truth to this? I believe this may only apply to Pensions since April 2016.

    Keep up the good work

    • David Morris says

      Hello Mike, yes – the years you served in the UK armed Forces are considered “contracted out”. This means that you are eligible for the Basic State pension, but not the State second pension. It applies to all pensions prior to 2016. The second state pension has been eliminated after 2016

  258. Alan Reeves says

    Hello David
    I was born in the UK in 1952, i worked and paid NI from about 18 yrs of age up until about 1992, that is about from 1970 up until about 1992 (20 years) i now live in the US since 1992 and i am now 65 years old, can i claim pension and if so how do i go about it ? i thank you for your help…………Alan.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Alan, yes, you are entitled to a UK pension, which you can claim this year, depending on what month you were born.
      If you join us, we will send you a complete info package on how to apply for the pension. If you do not know your NI number, we explain how to get that.

      • Alan Reeves says

        Hi David
        I want to join but only through my cc, but it will not let me unless i create a Pay Pal account and i really do not want to create that account…please help……Thank You……Alan.

        • David Morris says

          Hello Alan, you should be able to use your credit card. When you get transferred to the Paypal site, there should be an option on the page to use your credit card – not a Paypal account. Let me know if this isn’t available

        • Alan Reeves says

          So sorry to bother you with the last question, i have just called on the telephone and joined that way, i do thank you though………Alan.

  259. Colin Shaw says

    I am a UK citizen and receive the full UK state pension. My wife is Australian, born in April1952, and has a state pension age of 06/05/14. She has lived in UK for 4 years from 1978 – 1982 but didn’t work.

    She has then lived in UK from 1993 to the present, has an NI number and has worked in different jobs off and on, paying NI contributions for around 4 – 5 years. She hasn’t worked for about 12 years.

    We are staying in UK and do not envisage moving to Australia.

    Is she entitled to any UK state pension or indeed an Australian one?
    Thanks

    • David Morris says

      Hello Colin, I can not comment on the Australian pension, as I don’t know the rules there. In terms of UK pension, she is entitled to a small pension in her own right, but she is also entitled to a pension based on your contributions. This pension is roughly equal to 60% of your pension. This will be better than qualifying based on her own contribution record

  260. Brian Carter says

    David,
    I am a British citizen with Permanent Residency status in Australia.
    I have two queries one concerning myself and the other my wife.

    Firstly my wife.(DOB 2/11/1952),worked in the UK between 1969 and 1976.Would she be entitled to a part pension ?

    Myself.(DOB 6/8/1952).Worked in UK 1969- 1976 and 1978-1981.Would I be entitled to a part pension ?

    If yes to either could these be taken as ‘Lump Sum settlements and if so how do we go about initiating this ?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Brian, your wife is entitled to a part pension right now, as she only needed 1 year to qualify. You need 10. You most likely have 10 now, but if not, you can still contribute voluntarily to buy missing years. So, you can certainly become eligible for a partial pension.
      You can not take the state pension as a lump sum. Your wife will have the option of taking as a long sump any pension deferred from her pension start date, which was in 2015

  261. Susan Lees says

    Hi

    I am 51 and was born in the UK. I have 20 years of full contributions and I am trying to decide if it would be worth paying some voluntary contributions for any of the past 6 years or going forward. Do you know how much difference it would make to my weekly pension amount for each year I might pay voluntary contributions for?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Susan, it is definitely financially worthwhile to pay additional contributions to buy extra years. It is difficult to give a precise figure for how much extra you would get, as it depends on the amount of the pension when you reach pension age. However, if you use 2016 as an example, you would get roughly £4.5 a week for every extra year. That is approx. £230 a year. It will be more than that when you reach pension age, as it goes up every year from now until then

  262. Hi

    I was born in 1946. I held a lot of part-time jobs from about the age of 15 until I finished University in 1967. I have no idea if I would have paid NI contributions through those jobs. I worked full time in the UK for about three and a half years between late 1967 and early 1974. I just wanted to confirm whether I would not be eligible for any UK state pension. I do not have my National Insurance number unfortunately.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Natalie, you needed 10 years to qualify. Its hard to say whether you reached that. Depending on the part time job, they may have withheld NI contributions. If some of them did, you might have the 10 years you need.
      It doesn’t hurt to apply. If you join us, we will send you an info package on what to do next – including getting your NI number

  263. Bill Luz says

    Hi,

    Im a Brazilian citizen. I went to study in UK legally from 2003 and lived there till 2011. . I got married and my wife is European. I contributed 5 years and I have National Insurance Number. My wife worked there 3 years with NIN. Do we have any rights? How do we claim? When? Thank you

    • David Morris says

      Hello Bill, you can only claim your pension when you reach pension age. You didn’t tell me your date of birth, but I am guessing you are not pension age yet. You will need 10 years of contributions to qualify for any pension. The good news is that you can continue to make voluntary NI contributions from abroad. You can even buy back up to 6 years. Your wife is also able to make voluntary contributions. She will need to do that to qualify for a pension, as she will not be entitled to any pension based on your contributions.
      My best advice is for you to join us. We will email you an information package on what to do next, including how to make contributions from abroad. You can join us directly on this website by following the link.
      https://www.britishpensions.com/joinrenew/

  264. Simon Mills says

    Hello,
    I was born on 14 July 1952 and I am a British citizen by birth. From the age of three I lived in Rhodesia and subsequently in South Africa where I now reside. I am thinking of moving to the UK and would like to know if I can buy a British pension.
    Kind Regards,

    • David Morris says

      hello Simon, no – you can only get a pension by having worked in the UK for some period – usually 3 years.

  265. Soma Jeyendren says

    Hello David,

    I lived in the UK , between April 1974 and Dec 1980 , then again between, Jun 1983 and July 1986. Between these dates I worked in various jobs and paid my National Insurance contribution. I have a National Insurance card. I am now an Australian citizen and 66 years old. Can I get UK pension ? please advise.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Soma, you likely are entitled to a partial UK pension. If not, you are close – and you still have time to buy back a year or two which will get you to the minimum level. Don’t delay though, as you will lose the ability to buy back years as time progresses.

  266. Hi,
    I am British and worked ~8 years before my job transferred to Canada, where my wife and family emigrated to. She now has a UK pension and I am about to quality in about 6 weeks. I was in college for a couple of years and someone said that counted as working and thus I would be at 10 yrs?. Also my wife ( we are now separated) says I am eligible to get a pension based on her pension. I am a bit confused on all this. and wondering if this information is accurate. I now live in US and am getting a US pension. Am I eligible for any pension ? and do the assumptions I mentioned sound accurate?
    thanks very much for any information
    Stu

    • David Morris says

      Hello Stu, if you reached pension age after April last year, then you can not get a pension based on your spouses record. However, you are close to qualifying in your own right. You will need 10 years to qualify, which can include credits up to age 16 – but not College. You can still make voluntary payments from abroad, which will get you to the minimum you need

  267. hi i worked in uk from 1970 to 1979 then moved back to ireland would i be entitled to state pension from england

    • David Morris says

      hello Ann, under current EU rules, you will be entitled to a pension from the UK for the years you worked there

  268. Ian Macaskill says

    I am trying to buy back 2yrs to give me the 10 yrs to qualify for the basic pension. However, despite numerous ph calls to the UK no one will give me an answer. How much will it cost to buy back the two years and what will the pension amount be.
    I have applied for the state pension but need this info.
    I have been in Canada since ’76 retired in May’15 and will be 65 next yr.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Ian, if you join us, we can send you an information package that covers how to buy back years, what it costs and what the pension amount is

      • Ian Macaskill says

        Hi David, I am already a member, #33479, send me the info package.
        Thanks
        Ian.

        • David Morris says

          hello Ian, you would have received a package via email called MY CABP. Did you get that ?

          • Ian Macaskill says

            Thank you David, I found the info in the package you had sent me earlier. I am now at the stage of sending them CF 83. Will they send me a statement on how much my payments would be and the date they have to be paid by ?

          • David Morris says

            Hi Ian, yes – they should do that.

  269. Hello David, I was wondering if I qualify for a UK pension when I hit retirement age and if there is a benefit to making additional contributions. I was born in the UK in 1968 and lived/worked in the UK from age 16 until getting married and moving to Canada with my wife for six months at age 21..after this we returned to the UK and I worked (predominantly self employed) to approximate age of 26 at which point we returned to Canada and stayed. Any information you can give is much appreciated..thanks in advance..J

    • David Morris says

      Hello John, you will need 10 years for a minimum pension from the UK. I don’t know how many years you currently have, but if you don’t have 10, you can make voluntary contributions to get you there.
      I would recommend that you make at least enough voluntary contributions to get you to 10, otherwise all the contributions you made in the UK will be lost.
      It is also a good financial deal to buy additional pension years going forward. The return on investment is excellent

  270. irene steven says

    hello david
    i am living in australia, i was born in england in june 1949. my parents emigrated to australia when i was 14 years old, so i have never worked in england. however i am married to an english man born 1948 who is receiving an english pension. i was recently told, although i have never worked in england, i would be entitled to a partial pension. i was hoping you might be able to tell me if this is correct.

    thanks for listening
    irene steven

    • David Morris says

      Hello Irene, yes – you are entitled to a spousal pension equal to 60% of your husbands pension. It would also be backdated to 2009, which is when you reached pension age. It doesn’t come automatically, you have to apply separately. if you join us, we will send you an information package on how to go about claiming the pension

    • Hi
      I live in Australia now but worked in England for 14 years am I entitled to anything I was on wages and paid national insurance

  271. Allan Thompson says

    I’ve been living in The Netherlands since 1976. Prior to this period I worked for 6 years full time in the UK and paid national insurance. In three years time I’ll receive my Dutch pension. This will not be a full pension since one is only entitled to a full state pension if living uninterupted in this country from the age of 17. I was 23 when arriving here. Am I entitled to small UK state pension based on the 6 years of full time employment in the UK?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Allan, yes you are entitled to a UK pension for the years you worked there. As you live in the EU, you need only apply to the Netherlands pension dept. They will arrange for the UK pension to be paid

  272. michael gahagan says

    Hello i have lived in belgium 6yrs and in 2yrs reach 65 i opted out of serps about 20yrs ago and i am just wondering if i would still be entitled to a pension

    • David Morris says

      Hello Michael, yes you are still entitled to the basic UK State pension. Serps was an additional pension. The basic pension is the main pension

  273. SIa Kiew Ling says

    i’m wondering if i am qualify to British Pension. i was in UK from Feb 1972 to June 1977. In fact I got PR in UK. i was trained as state registered nurse and state certified midwife and worked as Staff Nurse with Work Permit in UK.I’m born in Feb 1952, currently stay in Malaysia. \

    • David Morris says

      Hello Sla Kiew Ling, yes you would be entitled to a partial UK pension, based on the time you were there. You can apply for it from Malaysia

  274. Mary Mcgee says

    hi, my husband passed away last year, he was receiving a partial British pension. Can you tell me if I am en tilted to anything based on his contributions, I live in the Republic of Ireland, I have never worked in the UK, my husband was born 1946 and I was born 1956

    • David Morris says

      Hello Mary, no – you would not be eligible for a state pension based on his pension, but you may be eligible for some Bereavement benefits. You would need to contact the Dept of Works and Pensions in the UK

  275. Hi there, just wondering if I qualify for UK pension. Born in Belfast in 1955 and worked for three to four years before immigrating to Canada in 1975. I have my number but was wondering if I qualify for a partial pension or could pay it up.

    Thanks for your help.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Geraldine, you will need 10 years to qualify, but the good news is that you are still able to make NI Contributions from Canada, which will get you additional years. You can also buy back at least 6 years. That will more than get you the minimum
      Don’t delay though, as you lose the ability to make back payments as time goes by

  276. Dave Groves says

    hi: I’m Dave, born may 10, 1944. worked for approx. 6 years before emigrating to Canada in July 1967. Do I qualify for any British Pension?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Dave, unfortunately no. You are of the age group that needed 11 years to qualify for a minimum pension and it is now too late to buy back any years

  277. Hi,

    I was born in the UK in 1953 and left when I was 5 years old. I have never worked in the UK or been back to live.
    Do I qualify for any pension at all?

    Kind Regards

    • Sorry, I forgot to add that I am considering moving back to UK sometime this year. If I work over there for how long will I have to work to claim any pension (if I can claim at all)?

    • David Morris says

      Hello Sue, no – you need to have worked there.

    • Jill Budd says

      Hi, my husband was born in N.Ireland 1953 and has worked in Britain on and off which would nearly add up to 10 years although most of his working life has been in New Zealand. If he returns to Derry would he be eligible for the UK pension.
      From JILL

      • David Morris says

        Hello Jill, he will need 10 years to qualify. The good news is that he can continue to make voluntary NI contributions from abroad, which will get him to at least 10. Yes, he will be eligible for that partial pension wherever he lives

  278. MARILYN MENDOZA says

    hello i worked in the UK for about 10 years and made contributions for the National Insurance. On my tenth year I was on maternity leave and I did not go back to the UK anymore, instead I moved to USA. Am I qualified to get a pension when i reached my retirement age? If I relinquish my British citizenship will i still be qualified to get my pension?
    I was born on 1975

    • David Morris says

      Hello Marilyn, you would need 10 years of NI contributions to qualify for a minimum pension. It sounds like you have that. You can also continue to make contributions from abroad, which will increase your pension. Your citizenship doesn’t affect pension eligibility. The only thing that counts is the number of years you contributed to the NI system

  279. Khoo Teng Hoe says

    Dear Sir,

    I am 65 years old (born in 1952). I came to London in 1978 and ended up working there for 7 years with Holiday Inn located at Swiss Cottage. I have my NI number and make contribution for 7 years. I left and went back to Malaysia. Am I still be eligible or entitled to any pension?

    Any guidance or assistance would be greatly appreciated.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Khoo Teng, you will likely need 10 years to qualify. The good news is that you are still able to make up to 6 years of back NI contributions, which will get you to the minimum. Don’t delay, though as you will lose the ability to make back payments over time. If you join us, we will send you a complete information package by email on how to get started, and how to make voluntary NI contributions from abroad

  280. Brian Moore says

    my son as lived in the U,S,A for 35 years is dual national he paid in contributions for 5 years after leaving school before going to the U,S,A could he pay a lump sum to be able to claim any pension he does not no is national insurance number thank you

    • David Morris says

      Hello Brian, I presume your son has not yet reached pension age. If that is correct, he will need 10 years of contributions to qualify for a minimum pension. He will be able to make back contributions for at least 6 years, so that will get him the minimum at least. He may be able to contribute more, depending on his age.

  281. Hi David, I am a Canadian female born in 1958, married a British man, worked in the UK for two years in the 80’s before returning to Canada. I have a NI number and contibuted for the two years. Am I able to buy voluntary and contribute to acheive a partial pension. Thank you for your advice. Susana

    • David Morris says

      Hello Susana, it is not certain if you will be able to make voluntary contributions from abroad. The general rule is that you need to have lived in the UK for 3 consecutive years. However, if your 2 years there spanned 3 calendar years, it might qualify. You have nothing to lose by enquiring. If the DWP confirms your eligibility to make contributions, then you are good.
      If you join us, we can tell you how to apply for a pension statement, and how to determine if you can make voluntary contributions.

  282. Musa Morgan says

    Hi David,
    Just wondered as I was speaking to my mother inlaw today who is 72 and a Malaysian who lived in the uk for about 25 years. She told me that she paid NI payments for about 11 years in the seventies whilst her husband was a student. Her four children all live in the UK but she moved back to Malaysia about 15 years ago but her husband passed away a few years ago so was thinking of moving back to the UK. Is she entitled to any state pension?

    Many thanks,

    Musa

  283. Hello David,

    I was born in April 1952 (65 nb) in Ireland and lived and worked in UK from 1989 to 1998. I returned to work and live in Ireland then. Am I entitled to a partial pension from the UK and what would it be? Is that something that is arranged through the Irish tax authorities at pension age?

    Thank you.

    Regards,
    Joe B.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Joe, yes this is something you arrange through the Irish pension authority. They will contact the UK and arrange for a pension to be paid from them for the years you worked there

  284. Cheryl Smith says

    Hi my brother in-law, is English he was out of the country for 20 years he has been back in the UK for 18 years with his wife.

    He has been working all the time. Will he qualify for the UK pension

    • David Morris says

      Hello Cheryl, yes – he will get pension credits for every year worked in the UK, which will create a pension for him. He needs a minimum of 10 years working – which he has, so he qualifies

  285. Hello,

    i have worked in UK for 7 years, and now i live abroad,
    i would like to make voluntary contributions from abroad.
    How can i do that, is there any bank account i must pay to or i must send some documents over.. ?

    Thank you

    • David Morris says

      Hello Linda, you will need 10 years minimum to qualify for a partial pension. The good news is that you can continue to make NI contributions from abroad. My best advice is for you to join us. We will email you a complete package of information on how to get started making contributions. We also keep our members up to date on pension developments in the UK

      Dave

  286. I Have worked in the UK from 1969 to 1995 or 26 years thereabouts , paying fill NHI conributions . From 1996 to approx. 2006 I became am employer , where I contributed type 2 contibutions . I know reside in Canada where I retired 10 years ago . Can you please inform me of my entitlements .

    Thankyou for your time .

    • David Morris says

      Hello Hugh, you are certainly entitled to a UK state pension. I can’t tell you the exact amount you will get, because it is based on the total years credit you actually have. Any pension you receive would also be backdated to the date you reached pension age. This could be a nice sum of money.
      I suggest you join us as soon as possible. We will inform you how to go about claiming your pension.

  287. Kathleen Neal says

    I was born in the UK in 1952. Worked in the UIK from 1967 to 1982 – when I migrated to Australia.
    Can you please let me know the procedures for claiming my UK pension.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Kathleen, my best advice is for you to join us. We will send you an information package on what to do next

  288. Stephen D O'Neill says

    I am 56 work 12 years in the uk moved to the states in 88 i am a perminant resident. i am now disabled would i still be able to get uk pension

    • David Morris says

      hello Stephen, yes you will be entitled to a partial UK pension on reaching pension age. The good news is that you can continue to make voluntary contributions from the US, which will increase that pension

  289. Dear Sir,

    I was born in 1943 and worked in London as a nurse for 3 years in the 1960’s. Am I entitled to a partial pension? From what I have been reading I don’t believe that I am nor that I can top up? Any light that you can shed would be most appreciated. I left the UK after that.

    With sincere thanks,
    Sheila

  290. Hi David,

    I am a German citizen, born in 1973 and worked full time in the UK from 1999 – 2005. During that time I paid into the UK state pension scheme. My question is:
    1) Am I entitled to receive some sort of state pension from the UK when I retire?
    2) If not, is there a chance to claim the payments now and transfer them into my pension fund in Germany?
    3) any links to documents I would need to complete – if applicable

    Thank you.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Barbara, under current EU rules you are entitled to a partial pension from the UK, for those years. You can not transfer them, but you will receive a pension paid by the UK. The current process is that you approach the local pension office of the country you reside in, once you reach pension age. They will take care of coordinating with the other Governments.
      Those are the current rules. I have no idea what will happen as a result of Brexit.

  291. Hi I am married and age 57 (58 this year) I worked full time for approx 10 years (1979-1992) years and have worked since 2005 self employed but fallen under the NI limit so been so called “exempt”. My husband has about 40 years so far of full NI. I presume I will not qualify for a full pension, but was interested to read about the 1/30th pension allowance which could be available. I am now considering should I start paying my NI contributions despite being under the radar amount, or not and if I would be eligible for any pension on my own and if I would be entitled to any top up. Both of us in UK and worked in UK. Many thanks for an amazing insight and “understandable” article !!! Thanks for any help x

    • David Morris says

      Hello Ella, at your age, you will need 35 years of contributions for a full pension. If you have less than that, it will be prorated on a 1/35th basis for each year you do have. You can certainly make voluntary payments for any gaps in your history, and this would get you additional years credit for the pension.

  292. Mark Track says

    Hi David. I just turned 65. I am a Canadian citizen permanently resident in the UK. I qualify for a partial UK State pension and partial Canadian CPP. I received letters from both authorities stating so.

    My question: can I elect to apply separately for my Canada pension entitlement (CPP + OSA) and my UK state pension? Or must I apply to transfer all my Canada CPP contributions (+20 years) to the UK, and only apply under the UK system.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Mark, you can apply for both pensions independently of each other. You can even take them at different times. You do not need to transfer credits.

  293. Liviu Dobre says

    If I start employment next month (my age is 59 years) and work till 65 years old as employed on minimum wage in the UK do I benefit from any pension in the UK. I know that on minimum wage there are no National Insurance contribution to be made. I have someone that is employed on minimum wage and he showed me on his pay slip that he doesnt pay NIC because of his wage.

    Thank you.

    • David Morris says

      Hello Liviu, if you are currently living and working in the UK, then you need to contact the local offices of the pension Dept. I am not up to date with all the benefits available to UK residents.

  294. Bridget Curry says

    I’m wondering if I will qualify for a top up of my british state pension when my husband retires in June 2017. He will have 22 qualifying years on the new state pension rules and I currently receive my pension under the old rules, having qualified in 2015 with 6 years. I’m hoping I can get more through his NI contributions!

    • David Morris says

      Hello Bridget, yes – you will qualify for a top up when your husband retires (if June is his official pension age), up to a maximum of 60% of his pension.

  295. Wendy Brown says

    Am I reading this correctly? I’m a British woman born in 1952 (almost 65). I only worked a year in the UK. I’m assuming I contributed since I worked as a teacher in Kent. Based on my gender and age, does that entitle me to a partial pension of 1/30th of a full pension? Can I receive this and still continue to work in the US? How do I find out what my NI number is? I have no documentation that lists it. Thanks!

    • David Morris says